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Home   Communities   Publications   Education   Issues   Convention   Join TESOL   June 20, 2014

 



Students hit by language school closures get new offers
Irish Examiner
Ireland: Hundreds of foreign students left in limbo by English language school closures are to be offered alternative programs at major discounts by other providers. The initiative has emerged from discussions that followed the closure since April of five colleges in Dublin and Cork, which left students facing huge uncertainty, particularly those who came here on student visas from non-EU countries. The deal, arranged by a task force set up by Education Minister Ruairi Quinn and Justice Minister Frances Fitzgerald, will see courses specially created by member colleges of Marketing English in Ireland, meaning affected students can complete programs similar to those they were already taking.
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Say something: Teaching critical response
By: Eva Sullivan
All of my high school students are recent immigrants to the U.S. These teenagers pick up oral language and slang from their peers fairly quickly, but may lag far behind when it comes to academic language used in an instructional setting. I have to assume they don't hear this language outside of the classroom. Therefore, it is my job to teach them appropriate oral responses to classroom discussion — and how to respond to their peers.
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Helping children learn language, develop cognitive skills
University of Chicago via Science Daily
Examining factors such as how much children gesture at an early age may make it possible to identify and intervene with very young children at risk for delays in speech and cognitive development, according to a new study. The corresponding paper offers evidence-based suggestions, which grew out of the study, for developing diagnostic tools and interventions to enhance language and cognitive development.
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TESOL Online Course: Separating Difference From Disability With Students Learning English as an Additional Language
7 July – 3 August
Explore assessment, intervention, and identification techniques effective in separating difference from disability. Learn what tools and strategies are available and appropriate to use. Hurry — registration closes 3 July.

TESOL International Academy in Seoul, Korea
26 – 27 July 2014
Organized in partnership with Sookmyung Women's University, this two-day academy provides ELT teachers, teacher trainers, and administrators with the latest thinking on building quality ELT organizations and programs through effective leadership, management, and teacher training. Participants will receive TESOL's ELT Leadership Management Certificate. Space is limited — register today.

ESL for the Secondary Science Teacher
Need help teaching English language learners in your science classroom? TESOL can help! Join TESOL for the online course ESL for the Secondary Science Teacher from 7 July – 3 August and explore the role of cultural perspectives in learning science, guiding principles of second language acquisition, and methods of instructional alignment of objectives, teaching, and assessment of scientific learning. Hurry — registration closes 2 July.

For more TESOL education programs, please visit the TESOL website.






Director of Training, AMIDEAST, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

EFL Instructor, Full Time, Troy University, Troy, Alabama, USA

Director of the Intensive English Language Institute, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska

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More educational services needed for immigrants and English learners
Contra Costa Times
California's future success depends on its ability to integrate immigrants and their children into colleges and the workforce, according to a recent report.

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Los Angeles schools' plan for non-English speakers: Segregation or solution?
The Christian Science Monitor
Los Angeles schools are moving forward with a plan to separate English language learner students from native speakers in all core elementary school classes. Protests have erupted.

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US experts to train Saudis in English language teaching
Arab News
Saudi Arabia: The Ministry of Education has invited specialists from Columbia University in the United States to train Saudi teachers on methods of teaching the English language.

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In federal-state relations on education policy, should locals get priority?
Education Week
In a K-12 policy landscape where the focus is often on what people in glamorous federal and state positions believe, forcing local officials to live in constant fear of audits and paperwork and giving them none of the power to pursue their own ideas is counterproductive. That was one of the main messages from a June 13 panel of officials and analysts hosted by the Center for American Progress on how federal decision making impacts states, and where the U.S. Department of Education could ease the burden on states to comply with certain policies.
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The 'common' in Common Core fractures as state support falters
The Hechinger Report
The Common Core's main selling point was that new, shared standards would ensure American students were learning at the same rates across state lines. Common standards — linked to common tests — would tell schools in Illinois how they stacked up against schools in Massachusetts or California. Now, as more states back out of the tests, the "common" in Common Core is threatened. In 2010, 45 states adopted the Common Core State Standards, a set of skills in math and English students should master in each grade.
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Scott should veto voucher expansion bill
Miami Herald
The success of Florida's quarter million students learning English as an additional language is important to the future of the children, their families, their communities and the state's economy. A bill awaiting Gov. Rick Scott's signature could hinder their progress, ample reason to strongly urge for a veto of SB 850. This bill would expand the school-voucher program before conflicts among state laws are reconciled. Students learning English as an additional language are known as English language learners. In Florida, they are entitled to enroll in programs of English for speakers of other languages.
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More educational services needed for immigrants and English learners
Contra Costa Times
California's future success depends on its ability to integrate immigrants and their children into colleges and the workforce, according to a recent report. One-quarter of the country's immigrants live in the state, including more than one-third of the nation's students who are English language learners, according to the study, called "Critical Choices in Post-Recession California: Investing in the Educational and Career Success of Immigrant Youth." Yet many educational services for these students were slashed during budget cuts of past years, said Sarah Hooker, co-author of the report by the Migration Policy Institute's National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy.
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Bellamy overcomes obstacles with the language of learning
The Tampa Tribune
When they started their lives as elementary school students in the United States, they were no different from any of the other kids at Bellamy Elementary School in Florida. It was a whole new world, one with challenges and new experiences. But, at Bellamy, many of the incoming students don't speak a word of English. All Hillsborough County public schools have non-English-speaking kids enter every year, but Bellamy is a little different. The school has students, parents, and staff from 37 different countries and they can speak about 19 different languages. The kids who enter Bellamy without much command of the English language might be scared, but it's a challenge that ESOL Resources Director Monica Roehm understands.
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International students being made to feel at home in US
Diverse: Issues In Higher Education
When Emmanuel Abu arrived in Huntington, West Virginia, from his native Nigeria to begin college at Marshall University last fall, everything seemed to have been planned out to ensure a smooth matriculation. A representative from the college picked him up at the airport. Like other international students, Abu's orientation lasted several days. He received an extensive tour of the campus that made him feel comfortable and intimately familiarized him with it. Through a special program for international students, Abu received comprehensive support that helped him to successfully acclimate to an American college classroom.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

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Britons: Immigrants must speak English and should have access to benefits restricted
Daily Mail
United Kingdom: Most people in Britain think immigrants should speak English and have their access to benefits restricted, but there is a "disconnect" between politicians' attitudes and public opinion on the issue, a survey has found. The annual British social attitudes poll revealed that 95 percent of the population think the English language is the cornerstone of Britishness. Around three out of four said you must be born in Britain or have lived here for most of your life to be classified as British, and six out of ten think EU migrants should wait three years before claiming benefits.
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Most important summer activity for kids? Not reading, many parents say
The Christian Science Monitor
Despite the importance that parents place on children's summer reading, it often takes a back seat to playing outside or screen time, reports a new national survey of parents with children ages 5 to 11. Eighty-three percent of parents say it is very or extremely important that their children read this summer, but only 17 percent say it is the most important activity — second to the 49 percent who prioritize playing outside, according to the survey of just over 1,000 parents commissioned by Reading Is Fundamental, a literacy nonprofit in Washington.
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7 reasons why it's good to speak another language
The Huffington Post
It's one of life's truths: Being bilingual or multilingual can only be considered a good thing. The ability to travel seamlessly in another country; to interact with people you wouldn't otherwise be able to communicate with; to really understand and immerse yourself in another culture, whether it be your own or another's; and on the most trivial level, to order off a menu and truly know what you're ordering. But aside from all these reasons, there is a multitude of research showing how speaking more than one language is also good for your health — particularly, the health of your brain.
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7 steps to authentic learning
eSchool News
Why authentic learning? There are so many reasons to choose from, some of the most important being: providing deep purpose for learning, empowering students, providing differentiation and choice options in learning, connecting students to others locally and globally, and allowing opportunities to develop empathy, creativity and innovation skills. While there are many wonderful resources on the Web regarding Problem Based Learning Units and authentic learning, it seems best to boil it down to a common definition teachers can remember. One that has worked is real purpose, real product and a real audience.
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Student power
Edutopia
The key commodity in education has been knowledge. It's the reason why we built buildings called schools and required children to come from miles around to sit in a room with the knowledge held in teachers' brains and captured between the covers of textbooks. That model has clearly been disrupted or — to be honest — destroyed. (For those traditionalists getting hot under the collar, let me hasten to add that teachers and books are still very important, but in a different way.) When the world's knowledge is not just in teachers' brains but at students' fingertips wherever they are, whenever they need it, shouldn't that change what happens in these places called schools?
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The TESOL English Language Bulletin is presented as a service to members of TESOL International Association and other English language teaching professionals. For information about TESOL member benefits, visit www.tesol.org or contact us at membership@tesol.org.

TESOL English Language Bulletin is a digest of the most important news selected for TESOL International Association from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. TESOL International Association does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of TESOL.

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