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Home   Communities   Publications   Education   Issues   Convention   Join TESOL   Sep. 27, 2013

 



Report: States backslide in achievement for English learners
Education Week
Just nine states met all of their federal goals for English language learners (ELLs) in making progress in learning the language and reaching academic targets in math and reading in the two school years spanning 2008-2010. This finding comes from a recently released report from the U.S. Department of Education. That's a drop from 11 states that met all their goals for ELLs in the 2007-2008 school year, and an even bigger slide backward from 2006-2007, when 17 states (a record high) reached all three academic benchmarks they set for English-learners. Those benchmarks include progress in learning English, attainment of fluency, and demonstration of proficiency on state content tests in reading and math.
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A gap in our field: Leadership in language education
By Andy Curtis
Books in our field on leadership and management are relatively rare, compared with books on methodology in TESOL, and compared with books on leadership and management in other fields, such as health care. Given the many thousands of language program administrators all over the world, it is surprising that there are not more books in this area. Many of us move from language teaching into language program administration almost "accidentally," and it may mean learning how to lead and manage from the periphery.
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Related content: From TESOL Press: English Language Teachers as Program Administrators (TESOL)



Preparing your ESL licensure program for NCATE/CAEP review

Join TESOL for this interactive virtual seminar 22 October 2013, 2:30–4 pm EST and learn about the process for preparing your ESL program for recognition by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education/Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (NCATE/CAEP). Gain an understanding of the recently revised TESOL/NCATE P-12 Teacher Education Standards, get step-by-step guidance on how to prepare your program report, and learn about the review process itself. Registration is only US$99 per institution. Register before 17 October 2013.

TESOL International Symposium in Guangzhou, China

Join TESOL in Guangzhou, China, 15-16 November 2013 for the international symposium Envisioning and Creating the Future for English Language Teaching and Learning. Come together with ELT teachers, teacher trainers, and administrators to discuss practical, research-based ideas, strategies, and tools to facilitate on-going improvement in the ELT field. Register today!

For more TESOL education programs, please visit the TESOL website.







English as a Second Language (ESL) Instructor, Santa Monica College, USA

Clinical Assistant Professor — TESOL/ Bilingual Education, Adelphi University, USA

Dean, Faculty of Human, Social & Educational Development, The Geldart Group, Canada

For more jobs, please visit the TESOL Career Center.


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Stamford, Conn., ELL students hear of predecessors' success
Stamford Advocate
Students in Westhill High's English as a second language program heard from community leaders who went through similar programs before becoming successful.

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Cutting to the Common Core: Making vocabulary No. 1
Language Magazine
The Common Core State Standards (CCSS, 2010) call upon students to tackle increasingly complex informational and narrative texts and articulate their comprehension using academic register.

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Does geography influence how a language sounds?
National Geographic
Languages spoken at high altitudes are more likely to contain a certain kind of sound made using short bursts of air, according to a new study. The study, published in the journal PLoS ONE, is the first to show that geography can influence how a language sounds.

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PARCC's common math tests to be translated into Spanish
Education Week
The common math assessments under development by PARCC will be translated into Spanish and possibly other languages, but whether English language learners will have access to non-English versions will depend on which state they live in. The governing board of PARCC — the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers — unanimously approved a policy that will allow test designers to have the math assessment translated into Spanish and other languages that member states need. Several states in PARCC have laws and regulations that forbid the use of languages other than English to test students.
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Stamford, Conn., ELL students hear of predecessors' success
Stamford Advocate
Students in Westhill High's English as a second language program heard from community leaders who went through similar programs before becoming successful. Westhill High Assistant Principal Tony Ramos and district Family Resource Facilitator Juan Pazmino organized an assembly to help inspire students in the school's English language learners' program.
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Texting generation: How's your vocabulary? LOL
Deseret News
Recent data verify what teachers have known all along. Students who possess strong vocabularies understand more of what they read. And it works in reverse. Reading helps children learn new words that could help them understand the next thing they read. It's a chicken-and-egg scenario that self-replicates once it gets started. The tricky part is figuring out how to boost these intertwined skills for a generation of kids whose preferred reading is as likely to be texts and tweets as textbooks and "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Heritage language programs on the rise
The Associated Press via NPR
Dorothy Villarreal grew up dreaming in Spanish, first in Mexico and later in South Texas, where her family moved when she was six. She excelled in school — in English. But at home life was in Spanish, from the long afternoon chats with her grandparents to the Spanish-language version of Barbie magazines she eagerly awaited each month. She figured she was fluent in both languages. Then the Harvard University junior spent last summer studying in Mexico and realized just how big the gaps in her Spanish were.
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Vietnam city to apply new English language testing system
Thanhniennews.com
Vietnam: Another framework for testing English language proficiency will be applied to teachers and students in Ho Chi Minh City, where a system designed by the University of Cambridge currently holds a monopoly. The city's Department of Education and Training on September 20 signed an agreement with IIG Vietnam Company, representative of the American-owned Educational Testing Service, on applying ETS tests.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    A recipe for ELL student success (Language Magazine)
Career dual-language educator named head of Federal ELL office (Education Week)
Why can't New York City kids master the English language? (Times Ledger)
11 tips on teaching Common Core critical vocabulary (Edutopia)
Employers can help win the war on bad grammar (Financial Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Adult education: Is it worth going back to school?
CNBC
Banking on going back to school as a way to get a leg up in the job market? Nearly 4 million adults who are 35 and older are enrolled in a degree-granting institution, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. More than two-thirds are women. Despite a slack job market, many may hope an advanced degree or new credential will make them more "marketable" — helping them find work in a new field, land a higher-paid position, or simply hold onto the job they have in an increasingly competitive environment.
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Majority of adults believe they are skilled English users
Malta Today
Malta: Fifty-three percent of Maltese aged between 25 and 64 perceive themselves as being proficient in English, marking the highest percentage across the 28 member states of the European Union. For the purpose of this survey, proficient meant the ability to understand and produce a wide range of demanding texts and use the language flexibly, the EU's statistical office Eurostat said. Together with Austria, Malta also topped the list of English as the most commonly studied foreign language at both primary and secondary level. Whereas the teaching of English at primary and secondary level in Malta is compulsory, the rate of students furthering their English studies at sixth form level falls from 100 percent to 66 percent. Italian, the second most studied foreign language in Malta is taken up by 16 percent of the students at sixth form.
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Only a few Germans say their English is good
The Local
Germany: English speakers in Germany may feel that everyone they try their German on replies in perfect English — but in fact just 16 percent of German adults who speak English consider they are good at it. This is one of the lowest rates in Europe, the latest figures show.
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Moving to the rhythm 'can help language skills'
BBC News
United Kingdom: Moving in time to a steady beat is closely linked to better language skills, a study suggests. People who performed better on rhythmic tests also showed enhanced neural responses to speech sounds. The researchers suggest that practicing music could improve other skills, particularly reading. In the Journal of Neuroscience, the authors argue that rhythm is an integral part of language.
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How to understand the deep structures of language
Scientific American
There are two striking features of language that any scientific theory of this quintessentially human behavior must account for. The first is that we do not all speak the same language. This would be a shocking observation were it not so commonplace. Communication systems and other animals tend to be universal, with any animal of the species able to communicate with any other. Likewise, many other fundamental human attributes show much less variation. Barring genetic or environmental mishap, we all have two eyes, one mouth, and four limbs. Around the world, we cry when we are sad, smile when we are happy, and laugh when something is funny, but the languages we use to describe this are different.
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Tablets for learning: Emphasis on capturing students' voices
MindShift
As more schools across the country begin to use tablets in classrooms, it's worth taking the time to note how other countries are incorporating tablets for learning. In this Slate article, Lisa Guernsey points out that the emphasis is less on games and interactive content and more on the iPad as a tool for capturing experiences.
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The TESOL English Language Bulletin is presented as a service to members of TESOL International Association and other English language teaching professionals. For information about TESOL member benefits, visit www.tesol.org or contact us at membership@tesol.org.

TESOL English Language Bulletin is a digest of the most important news selected for TESOL International Association from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. TESOL International Association does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of TESOL.

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