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Home   Communities   Publications   Education   Issues   Convention   Join TESOL   Oct. 11, 2013

 



A Euro welcome in English
Inside Higher Ed
Europe: A growing number of master's programs are being offered in English, a study suggests. A total of 6,407 master's programs in the language were offered on the Continent as of June of this year — a 38 percent rise over the 4,644 courses available just 18 months earlier, according to a report by the Institute of International Education. That total was 10 times higher than the overall number offered in 2002, says the report. The study is based on course listings from the Study Portals website, which provided information from 1,200 public and private universities in mainland Europe. Programs in English account for almost a third of the 21,000 master's courses advertised on the site in continental Europe, the report indicates.
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Comprehension: Do your English learners understand your instruction?
By Erick Herrmann
Every teacher intuitively knows the importance of student comprehension of instruction. Without comprehension, there is no learning. When teachers have the added challenge of working with students at varying English proficiency levels, they must find ways to lower the linguistic demand of the content, while keeping the academic rigor in place. Several key concepts and techniques can be used to help English learners comprehend to a greater degree in any classroom.
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Preparing your ESL licensure program for NCATE/CAEP review

Join TESOL for this interactive virtual seminar 22 October 2013, 2:30–4 pm EST and learn about the process for preparing your ESL program for recognition by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education/Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (NCATE/CAEP). Gain an understanding of the recently revised TESOL/NCATE P-12 Teacher Education Standards, get step-by-step guidance on how to prepare your program report, and learn about the review process itself. Registration is only US$99 per institution. Register before 17 October 2013.

TESOL Core Certificate Program — Now Accepting Applications

Applications are being accepted for TESOL's popular Core Certificate Program, which will commence in January 2014. This program is a 130-hour online training program that's designed for current or prospective teachers or administrators worldwide. It provides a foundation in the theory and practice of English language teaching. For more information and to apply, visit TESOL Core Certificate Program online. Applications are due 17 November 2013.

TESOL International Symposium in Guangzhou, China

TESOL is coming to Guangzhou, China, 15–16 November 2013 for the international symposium Envisioning and Creating the Future for English Language Teaching and Learning. Come together with ELT teachers, teacher trainers, and administrators to discuss practical, research-based ideas, strategies and tools to facilitate ongoing improvement in the ELT field. Register by 20 October and take advantage of early registration discounts.

For more TESOL education programs, please visit the TESOL website.







ESL Instructor, A.C.E. Language Institute, Montana State University, USA

Assistant Director for English Language Program, University of Michigan-Flint, USA

Fellowships Available Worldwide, English Language Fellow Program, Worldwide

Associate Director of the English Language Institute, Mercer University, USA

For more jobs, please visit the TESOL Career Center.


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Bilingual education: Why gutting it hurts us all
Voxxi
Hispanic Heritage Month provides the perfect opportunity to explore how bilingual education positively or negatively affect our children. Despite study after study showing that bilingual education benefits students and communities, budget cuts and xenophobia nationwide have led to many dual-language programs being cut in Florida, Texas and California.

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Cutting to the Common Core: Making vocabulary No. 1
Language Magazine
The Common Core State Standards (CCSS, 2010) call upon students to tackle increasingly complex informational and narrative texts and articulate their comprehension using academic register.

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Does geography influence how a language sounds?
National Geographic
Languages spoken at high altitudes are more likely to contain a certain kind of sound made using short bursts of air, according to a new study. The study, published in the journal PLoS ONE, is the first to show that geography can influence how a language sounds.

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Race to the Top for districts: 219 applicants vie for $120 million
Education Week
Despite some delivery problems that came alongside a federal government shutdown, 219 applicants made last week's deadline for the U.S. Department of Education's second Race to the Top district contest. A few more from Colorado may trickle in, however, as districts affected by flooding in that state have until Thursday to apply. This year's applications, made by districts and groups of districts, represent 678 total school systems in 44 states. The only states without any Race to the Top district applicants were Iowa, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming — plus Hawaii and Washington, D.C., which have just one district each.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Teach and learn with englisharticles

The new app englisharticles clearly explains the concepts that determine the use of articles in Standard English. It is a detailed reference guide for teachers and learners of ESL, and for non-native English speaking students who struggle with academic English. Includes lots of examples, and interactive exercises with detailed answers.
www.grammar-matters.com
Apple app link
Android app link
 


Study: Help needed on strategies for teaching Common Core
Education Week
The Common Core State Standards require considerable writing across many subjects, but the standards themselves won't be enough to guide teachers to best practices in writing instruction, according to a new analysis. In a study in the current issue of School Psychology Review, researchers Gary A. Troia of Michigan State University and Natalie G. Olinghouse of the University of Connecticut used a set of 36 writing-instruction and testing practices that have been shown in prior studies to improve students' writing skills across different areas, including the writing process, context, purposes and motivation.
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In Morrisville, NC, ESL classes attract Chinese-Americans
News & Observer
When the town started offering free English as a second language classes, everyone expected Indian-Americans and Latinos to take part. But another group is showing the most interest: Chinese-Americans. Morrisville, N.C., is known for its large Asian-American population. The town has the highest concentration of Indian-Americans — about 20 percent — of any Wake County, N.C., municipality. But as the ESL program shows, Morrisville's Asian community is diverse. With 483 residents, Chinese-Americans are the second-largest ethnic group within the town's Asian demographic.
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English language support growing in Saskatchewan schools
CBC News
Canada: While immigration is driving Saskatchewan's booming population, students in immigrant families often need English language support in school. Over the past five years, that migration has changed demographics. School divisions across the province now have thousands of students whose first language is not English. In Regina and Saskatoon, more than 8,000 students need extra help with English.
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Burlington, Vt., seeks to improve English language learner program
Vermont Public Radio
Vermont's Burlington School District is the most diverse in the state. But the district has been criticized for not providing an equal education experience to minority students, especially those who are not native English speakers. Burlington's English language learner program was recently evaluated, and now the district is taking those recommendations into account. Burlington's status as a U.S. refugee resettlement city makes the city home to families from all over the world. When refugee families arrive, not all speak English.
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Grappling with global learning
Inside Higher Ed
Virtually every college says it puts a priority on "global" or "international" learning and, in recent years, many have added language to that effect to their mission statements. But in the haste to do so, some institutions haven't quite fleshed out what they mean by it or what strategies will best support it.
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Increasing diversity in higher education through class
University World News
For more than four decades, affirmative action programs in the United States have sought to create equal educational opportunity for historically disadvantaged groups. Over that time we have made undeniable progress, clearing a path to higher education for women and students of color. Still, as the number of students pursuing a college degree has risen, the income divide on college campuses has widened.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What does the possible government shutdown mean for schools? (Education Week)
Making conversation stick (Language Magazine)
Report by young immigrants and refugees urges credit for ESL classes (Vancouver Free Press)
Why do English teachers have to be native speakers? (The Japan Times)
Understanding how infants acquire new words across cultures (Northwestern University via Science Daily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Study: US adults below average in literacy, basic math
NPR
Adults in the U.S. fall behind many of their developed-world counterparts in such basic areas as math, reading and problem-solving using technology, according to a newly released report authored by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies surveyed 166,000 teens and adults ranging in age from 16 to 65 years old in 24 countries. In each of the main areas, adults in more than a dozen countries, including Japan, Finland, Australia and Canada, consistently scored higher than the United States, which ranked below average or near the bottom in almost every category.
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Troubling stats on adult literacy
Inside Higher Ed
Eight years ago, a national survey on adult literacy offered data on the extent to which Americans — even those with college credentials — were declining in their proficiency to do the basic kinds of reading people use in everyday life. The finding, published just as President Bush and his education secretary, Margaret Spellings, were cranking up a national commission on the state of higher education, was often cited as evidence of the failings of colleges and universities.
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Bilingual education: Why gutting it hurts us all
Voxxi
Hispanic Heritage Month provides the perfect opportunity to explore how bilingual education positively or negatively affect our children. Despite study after study showing that bilingual education benefits students and communities, budget cuts and xenophobia nationwide have led to many dual-language programs being cut in Florida, Texas and California. Most recently, for example, the Irving Independence School District outside of Dallas gutted its program, which for years was championed by newly retired school board member Ronda Huffstetler. Specifically upsetting for her is that students can test out of mainly Spanish-speaking classes — and attend English-only classes — as early as second grade.
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Reading is good for your health
Science Daily
People with poor reading skills are likely to be less healthy than those who read easily, according to recent research. Literacy skills are important for keeping in good shape. "Some people don't seem to obtain necessary health information because they're not good readers," says associate professor Kjersti Lundetræ at the University of Stavanger's Reading Center. Together with fellow associate professor Egil Gabrielsen at the Reading Centre and general practitioner Reidar Stokke, she has written an article on this subject entitled Health in Every Word.
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Handwriting vs. typing: Which skill do students need most?
EdTech Magazine
What if 20 years from now, writing by hand on paper is as outdated as taking a chisel and hammer to a slab of stone? It might sound unthinkable, but given the current trajectory of K-12 education, handwriting could take a backseat to typing as technology dominates the way we communicate. As digital natives have begun to make their way through the educational system — effortlessly wielding mobile devices and navigating the web for independent research — more people have begun to wonder about the future of handwriting.
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Smart strategies that help students learn how to learn
MindShift
What's the key to effective learning? One intriguing body of research suggests a rather riddle-like answer: It's not just what you know. It's what you know about what you know. To put it in more straightforward terms, anytime a student learns, he or she has to bring in two kinds of prior knowledge: knowledge about the subject at hand (say, mathematics or history) and knowledge about how learning works. Parents and educators are pretty good at imparting the first kind of knowledge. We're comfortable talking about concrete information: names, dates, numbers, facts. But the guidance we offer on the act of learning itself — the "metacognitive" aspects of learning — is more hit-or-miss, and it shows.
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Now teachers encourage computer games in class
The Wall Street Journal
At a private school in Houston, eighth-graders slingshot angry red birds across a video screen for a lesson on Newton's law of motion. High-school students in Los Angeles create the "Zombie Apocalypse" computer game to master character development. And elementary students in Hampstead, N.C., build a virtual city to understand spatial reasoning. These seemingly playful adventures represent a new frontier in education: videogames as teaching tools.
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The TESOL English Language Bulletin is presented as a service to members of TESOL International Association and other English language teaching professionals. For information about TESOL member benefits, visit www.tesol.org or contact us at membership@tesol.org.

TESOL English Language Bulletin is a digest of the most important news selected for TESOL International Association from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. TESOL International Association does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of TESOL.

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