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Home   Communities   Publications   Education   Issues   Convention   Join TESOL   Nov. 15, 2013

 



Celebrating National Literacy Month
WHIZ-TV
Pre-school students through Ohio's Muskingum Valley Educational Service Center get a lesson in the importance of reading. November is National Literacy month and to celebrate guest readers have come to the pre-school classrooms. Recently, WHIZ's Brian Wagner and his wife Christine spent time reading to special education students at the MVESC's preschool classes at Starlight.
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First lady authors children's book aimed at early literacy
Wyoming Tribune-Eagle
Wyoming's first lady Carol Mead has made no secret of her desire to improve early childhood literacy in the state. Now she is meeting the challenge head-on with a book that she hopes will find its way onto the shelves of first-graders across the Cowboy State.
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K–12 Dream Day in Portland, Ore.

TESOL invites all mainstream teachers and administrators to join a host of ESL experts and educators for a day of interactive training. The day features 20 workshops, several practice-oriented sessions, keynote speaker NEA Vice President Lily Eskelsen García, and ELPA21 Panel Discussion: A New Assessment for English Language Learners. Don't miss this hands-on event packed with new strategies and resources for working with English language learners. Registration is now open!

Pre- and Postconvention Institutes

Planning to arrive to the TESOL 2014 convention early? Sticking around town afterwards? Make the most of your stay by attending Pre- and Postconvention Institutes. PCIs offer in-depth, hands-on professional development. Topics for 2014 include content-based instruction, computer-assisted language learning, pronunciation, writing, materials development and much more. Register today!

For more TESOL education programs, please visit the TESOL website.







English Instructor, Noriko Kajiwara, Japan

Director of English for Speakers of Other Languages and International Student Services, Hendrix College, USA

Instructor of English, Kings Colleges, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Chile

For more jobs, please visit the TESOL Career Center.


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Does geography influence how a language sounds?
National Geographic
Languages spoken at high altitudes are more likely to contain a certain kind of sound made using short bursts of air, according to a new study. The study, published in the journal PLoS ONE, is the first to show that geography can influence how a language sounds.

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Cutting to the Common Core: Making vocabulary No. 1
Language Magazine
The Common Core State Standards (CCSS, 2010) call upon students to tackle increasingly complex informational and narrative texts and articulate their comprehension using academic register. Beyond the primary grades, developing readers must digest detailed concepts.

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Language teachers use visual cues to engage students
The Columbus Dispatch
The second-graders applauded, cheered and even screamed for Scott Koehler's language-arts lesson. The teacher at Hamilton Elementary in Ohio explained the differences between fiction and nonfiction as he clapped, gestured and pointed to his eyes.

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Latin America's English proficiency 'very low'
MercoPress
Education First, a Swiss-based education company with English language schools all over the world, created the third edition of its English Proficiency Index (EF EPI) by drawing on the test results of an estimated 750,000 adults worldwide who took English proficiency tests online, including only countries with over 400 participants in the final index.
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Language barriers the new school segregation
Albuquerque Journal
Activist and educator Matthew Lynch recently asked if language barriers are the “new segregation.” He challenged readers of an Education Week blog to consider if it is “fair to separate our student populations based on their native language.”
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Teach and learn with englisharticles

The new app englisharticles clearly explains the concepts that determine the use of articles in Standard English. It is a detailed reference guide for teachers and learners of ESL, and for non-native English speaking students who struggle with academic English. Includes lots of examples, and interactive exercises with detailed answers.
www.grammar-matters.com
Apple app link
Android app link
 


KPMG looks past private sector: Expands to literacy, outcomes and social justice
Forbes
Passion alone does not foster social justice or equality within a society, but when those who have the means to change a community's educational, economic and health outcomes are passionate about the mission, real progress can be made. That is exactly what John Veihmeyer, chairman and CEO of KPMG LLP, and his colleagues have set out to do with the KPMG's Family for Literacy program.
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Raising the bar on literacy
The Roanoke Times
Roanoke, Va., Gov. Bob McDonnell's press release hailing the latest reading and math scores on the Nation's Report Card seemed oddly cheery given the fact that just 43 percent of Virginia fourth-graders are reading at or above proficiency levels. But that so-so statistic still qualifies the commonwealth as above average in a nation where just 35 percent of all students in fourth grade are proficient and 32 percent are rated functionally illiterate.
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For Chinese parents, local control is 'lost in translation'
AsianWeek
Warren Wong's son attends public school in San Francisco. A designated English Learner, Wong put him in an after-school program to help accelerate his language skills, and it seemed to be working until the lights went out.
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Media literacy for young children: Essential for school success in today's world
The Huffington Post
Diane Levin writes, "The Massachusetts Legislature's House-Senate Joint Committee on Education recently heard testimony on behalf of legislation proposed to develop comprehensive media literacy education in kindergarten through 12th grade. I testified in strong support of this legislation because of my deep concern about how media and technology are affecting today's young children and changing what and how they learn."
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7 do's and don'ts of raising a bilingual child
Babble
Those embarking on the journey of raising bilingual kids know it's definitely not an easy thing to do. Not only does it require commitment, ingenuity, planning and consistency, but also a sense of hyper awareness because you’re always placing language input as a day-to-day, moment-to-moment priority.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Need for English language programs on the rise in Durham (Durham Region)
What it takes (and means) to learn English as an adult (NPR)
Jobs in Canada: Where, what and for whom? (Hire Immigrants)
Migrant workers give the local Barrie economy a boost (CTV News)
Using outside materials in the classroom (Oxford University Press)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Learning English
WBUR-FM
The English-language learning population is the fastest-growing demographic in the Massachusetts public school system. But it's also consistently the worst performing, with the lowest MCAS scores and the highest dropout rates. This school year, the Massachusetts Department of Education is rolling out a new program that aims to train thousands of teachers to help non-English-speaking students.
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Literacy: Improve it or pay the price
KTAR-FM
The 2013 Nation's Report Card from the National Assessment of Education Progress showed only 35 percent of U.S. fourth-graders read proficiently, according to scores posted recently. And, 32 percent scored below basic reading levels, meaning they are functionally illiterate. That's bad news for those millions of children.
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Adding up the cost of low literacy among adults
NPR
Low literacy rates for adults can have wide-ranging effects on those around them. They may rely more heavily on government services; their children may not get that extra hand with schoolwork; their families may not get sufficient financial support.
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Learning a new language is the newest method for teaching English effectively, eReflect states
Newsday
The Ultimate Vocabulary blog editor has revealed through an interview with Kirsten Kukulski of the website englishisapieceofcake.com, that learning a new language helps teachers and other educators better understand what approaches and techniques to implement when teaching language skills to ESL learners.
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Literacy depends on nurture, not nature, education professor says
Medical Xpress
A University at Buffalo education professor has sided with the environment in the timeless "nurture vs. nature" debate after his research found that a child's ability to read depends mostly on where that child is born, rather than on his or her individual qualities. "Individual characteristics explain only 9 percent of the differences in children who can read versus those who cannot," says Ming Ming Chiu, lead author of an international study that explains this connection.
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The TESOL English Language Bulletin is presented as a service to members of TESOL International Association and other English language teaching professionals. For information about TESOL member benefits, visit www.tesol.org or contact us at membership@tesol.org.

TESOL English Language Bulletin is a digest of the most important news selected for TESOL International Association from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. TESOL International Association does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of TESOL.

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