This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version  RSS  Subscribe  Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit |  Buyers Guide for Educators:    

Home   Communities   Publications   Education   Issues   Convention   Join TESOL   Dec. 24, 2013

 






Does geography influence how a language sounds?
National Geographic
Languages spoken at high altitudes are more likely to contain a certain kind of sound made using short bursts of air, according to a new study. The study, published in the journal PLoS ONE, is the first to show that geography can influence how a language sounds. "I had this hypothesis that [certain sounds] might be more common at high altitudes," said study author Caleb Everett, an anthropological linguist at the University of Miami.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Sequestration and aid to ELLs: What happens to Title III?
Education Week
Unless a standoff between President Barack Obama and Congressional Republicans gets rapidly resolved, across-the-board federal spending cuts will be triggered and set off a cascade of effects for public schools, including programs that serve English language learners. Title III, Part A, of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, provides roughly $730 million in aid to states and districts to support instruction for students who are not proficient in English. That aid pays for things like ESL teachers, bilingual classroom aides, and curricular materials for English learners.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: What makes a good teacher
The Washington Post
Even as most of the nation's 15,000 public school districts roll out new systems to evaluate teachers, many are still struggling with a central question: What's the best way to identify an effective educator? After a three-year, $45 million research project, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation believes it has some answers. The most reliable way to evaluate teachers is to use a three-pronged approach built on student test scores, classroom observations by multiple reviewers and teacher evaluations from students themselves, the foundation found.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Cutting to the Common Core: Making vocabulary No. 1
Language Magazine
The Common Core State Standards (CCSS, 2010) call upon students to tackle increasingly complex informational and narrative texts and articulate their comprehension using academic register. Beyond the primary grades, developing readers must digest detailed concept- and data-driven passages and extract essential content in order to respond to text-dependent questions. Whether countering an argument during a formal class debate or crafting an evidence-based constructed written response, students must adeptly draw from sources using advanced syntax, precise vocabulary, and accurate grammar.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


10 creative ways to teach English that deliver outstanding results
The Guardian
London: As a creative school, with a track record in fantastic English results, teachers at Holy Trinity and St. Silas School in London are often asked what their specific approach is: How do we teach through the arts yet manage to maintain such high expectations from all our pupils? Anna Warren, English subject leader at the school, would like to share some of these approaches with you.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SHOWCASE
  Put your passion into practice

Teach with a purpose. SIT students learn to teach language for social change, advocacy, education, and empowerment. SIT now has a summer low-residency program that offers current teachers the same highly regarded TESOL graduate education as the SIT on campus program.
Learn more at sit.edu/tesol.
 


Engaging learners through games: Help or hype?
eSchool News
"Engagement" has become a popular buzzword, as educators increasingly cite disengaged students as a problem that needs to be fixed. In this context, games are often trumpeted as the perfect tool for creating student engagement. But what do we really know about how engagement works? What opportunities and risks do games present as tools for increasing engagement? And how can educators judge whether a game product truly helps drive student engagement or is merely hype?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Arming Arkansas teachers with guns in school
USA Today
When the new school year begins in Clarksville, Ark., some staff will carry a slightly heavier workload — 9mm handguns. The school district is making use of a state law that allows teachers to carry concealed handguns on campus.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE





What it takes (and means) to learn English as an adult
NPR
Ana Perez never made it to high school. Her education ended after the sixth grade, when war broke out in her native El Salvador. She says she's "desperate" to learn English, but she gets nervous trying to speak it. Immigrants like Perez see English as the key to a better life. Many hope learning the language will help lift them out of poverty and integrate them into American society. But gaining English proficiency is a difficult task amid everyday obligations.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword ENGLISH.


Language teachers use visual cues to engage students
The Columbus Dispatch
The second-graders applauded, cheered and even screamed for Scott Koehler's language-arts lesson. The teacher at Hamilton Elementary in Ohio explained the differences between fiction and nonfiction as he clapped, gestured and pointed to his eyes — all visual cues for key words and concepts. The students mirrored his actions. The techniques are part of a teaching approach known as "whole brain" that suggests that students learn better when they engage their senses. "If they say it, see it, do it and teach it, they'll remember it more," said Koehler, who started using the techniques two years ago.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Expert: Vocabulary instruction failing US students
Science Daily
Vocabulary instruction in the early years is not challenging enough to prepare students for long-term reading comprehension, argues a study led by a Michigan State University education researcher. The study, which appears in Elementary School Journal, analyzed commonly used reading curricula in U.S. kindergarten classrooms. It found that, generally, the programs do not teach enough vocabulary words; the words aren't challenging enough; and not enough focus is given to make sure students understand the meaning of the words.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Why every professor needs linguistics 101
The Chronicle of Higher Education
By now it should be obvious that grammar instruction doesn't benefit anyone. Students hate it; teachers never learned grammar themselves, or if they did, they promptly forgot most of it. And study after study shows that overt grammar lessons don't lead to better writing. Right?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SHOWCASE
  LAS Links Assessments Go Online

Identify the needs of your English Language Learners with an automated, time-saving assessment tool in speaking, listening, and reading. LAS Links Online™ is designed to strengthen your English Language Development Program and provides research-based results to support your instructional decisions.
Visit CTB.com/LASLinksOnlineDemos for an in-depth look at LAS Links Online.
 


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Movies enhance language learning program (TribLive)
Ahead of games, Sochi tries to learn English (The Moscow Times)
A poverty, not education, crisis in U.S. (USA Today)
Israel, UK team up to improve English education (The Times of Israel)
11 foreign education policies that could transform American schools (The Huffington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Los Angeles schools' plan for non-English speakers: Segregation or solution?
The Christian Science Monitor
Plans to separate Los Angeles elementary school students who are not fluent in English from native speakers in all core classes are drawing fire, as educators and parents say the move will make the students "second-class citizens" in their own schools. The policy is an attempt to improve the performance of non-English-speaking students in response to a two-year-old federal civil rights lawsuit. Test results show that as many as 50,000 district students classified as "English language learners" in kindergarten never become proficient.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


World Class: Be the Solution

In our TESOL/TFL programs, you’ll learn the world’s most important skills from our instructors: bringing people together through the power of a new language. MORE
Put Your Passion Into Practice

Teach with a purpose. SIT students learn to teach language for social change, advocacy, education, and empowerment through SIT’s online and on campus accredited master degree programs. MORE


What parents need to know about race-based academic goals
NBC Latino
What is the No Child Left Behind Act, and why do some states have waivers from it? The No Child Left Behind Act, a federal school-accountability law passed by Congress in 2001, called for all students to be proficient in reading and math by the end of the 2013-2014 school year. Schools are required to report on the progress of all students, but they must also break out certain groups of students, including racial minorities, English language learners and students in special education.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Costa Rica as an ESL kick-start
The Costa Rican Times
Costa Rica: One of the more frustrating aspects of attempts at entering a new field is a lack of experience. Potential employers look for that intangible amount of experience but would rather not provide the opportunity to reach that requisite. The ESL world is no different. There is big money to be made and large contracts to be signed around the world to teach the elite and affluent. To have your signature on such contracts you will require relevant experience.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  New SIOP Classroom Video From CAL
SIOP in Action: Instructional Videos Featuring Complete SIOP Lessons at Three Grade Levels

Three videos, available on one DVD with a companion guide, are designed to deepen understanding of SIOP Model implementation at the classroom level and to support professional development initiatives.

Learn more.
 


'We're not this alien group': Chinese students on fitting in at US colleges
The Atlantic
Four Chinese students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where Chinese enrollment has grown 356 percent in the last decade, have set out to educate their American peers about themselves. They've taken to YouTube to explain the social misunderstandings that block many foreign students — particularly those from Asia — from integrating with the slang-speaking, booze-guzzling Americans.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Supporting English learners in the primary classroom
2013 Teaching Channel
Common Core Standards ask students to construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others in math; ask and answer questions about key details in a text; and participate in collaborative conversations about topics and texts. Students are expected to explain their thinking and build on others' talk in conversation. But what if your students don't speak English?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


CAL Solutions: Boosting ELL Achievement

CAL can provide teachers with diverse learning strategies to help ELLs succeed in school. CAL can customize services to meet your needs and budget. More.
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the TESOL eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469.420.2629.
MORE


9 tips for teaching English to non-English speakers
Dhaka Tribune
Bangladesh: Students applying to the U.S., U.K. or Australia often do not have English as their first language. Hence classrooms in these countries are becoming increasingly diverse with increasing numbers of students whose primary language is not English. Today these students are referred to as English language learners or just English learners. Support is provided in the foreign land for ELs, but local teachers are also responsible in aiding them with the right learning techniques and atmosphere for their English proficiency.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


US experts to train Saudis in English language teaching
Arab News
Saudi Arabia: The Ministry of Education has invited specialists from Columbia University in the United States to train Saudi teachers on methods of teaching the English language. They will also visit public schools to elicit the views and opinions of students and teachers on the curriculum. The specialists will conduct surveys during their visits to schools and interact with staff and students to gather information on the benefits they have derived from the present curriculum and methods of teaching.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE



How are your vendors doing? Tell us in the English Language Professional's Resource Guide.


Bilingual speakers develop mental flexibility
PsychCentral
Researchers are learning that the benefits of being bilingual extend well beyond enhanced communication capabilities. Penn State researchers discovered that as bilingual speakers learn to switch languages seamlessly, they develop a higher level of mental flexibility. "In the past, bilinguals were looked down upon," said Judith F. Kroll, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Psychology, Linguistics and Women's Studies.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


International schools boom as more seek education in English
International Herald Tribune
Hong Kong: A century ago, there were only a handful of international schools in the world, mostly set up by Western corporations so overseas employees would have a place to educate their children. (Shell has had one in Borneo since the 1920s, after it discovered oil there in the 1910s). The divide between what was once known as the First World and everyone else was more clearly defined then. So was education. International schools were small, elite replicas of Western schools for the generally white, rich children of parents posted in "exotic" locales. Locals were left to local schools.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 
The TESOL English Language Bulletin is presented as a service to members of TESOL International Association and other English language teaching professionals. For information about TESOL member benefits, visit www.tesol.org or contact us at membership@tesol.org.

TESOL English Language Bulletin is a digest of the most important news selected for TESOL International Association from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. TESOL International Association does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of TESOL.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
Hailey Golden, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   Contribute news
Craig Triplett, Senior Editor, Web Content and Social Media Manager for TESOL, 703-518-2526
Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages | 1925 Ballenger Ave., Suite 550 | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.tesol.org |    
+1 703-836-0774

This edition of the TESOL English Language Bulletin was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Dec. 17, 2013
Dec. 13, 2013
Dec. 10, 2013
Dec. 6, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063




7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063