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Home   Communities   Publications   Education   Issues   Convention   Join TESOL   Dec. 31, 2013

 



How can portfolio assessment develop English language teaching?
By Ream Odetallah
An assessment is a tool used for grading students objectively, and the types of assessments implemented vary concretely to obtain certain goals that a teacher has set during the learning process as part of language development. To create optional assessments targeted for a certain class or group of students, there are rubrics that must be followed, and these rubrics shape the forms of evaluations.
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Background knowledge: Why is it important for ELL programs?
By Erick Herrmann
Background knowledge — we all have it. All humans, throughout their lives, have learned about the world around them. Babies explore the world under the careful watch of their caregivers, children learn by playing with others and going to school, and adults continue their journey of learning about the world through work and social situations. When it comes to English learners and students from diverse cultural and educational backgrounds, the type and amount of background knowledge related to a particular topic can vary.
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Struggling with the past tense: Verbal acquisition of -ed forms of verbs
By Beth Crumpler
English language learners often struggle with understanding when to use the various past tense pronunciations of the English sounds for –ed at the end of regular English verbs. They get confused with when they should use the [d], [əd] or [t] sounds. Explicit instruction is important for fluent verbal acquisition of these differing sounds. Instructional methodologies need to be clear and precise in order for students to understand.
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Using sentence frames, sentence starters and signal words to improve language
By Erick Herrmann
For students to be college- and career-ready, they must gain academic language proficiency. Academic language is much more than just the vocabulary of the subject area being taught. To help students at all language proficiency levels incorporate higher levels of academic language into their speech and writing, teachers can incorporate the use of sentence frames, sentence starters and signal words with students at a variety of proficiency levels.
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Parental support for limited-English-speaking parents
By Kitty Warsame
This article explores need of support for limited-English-speaking parents in public schools, the effect it has on new teachers, and a call for action. The focus of this article is divided in the following areas: brief summary on immigrant families entering the United States, how the lack of support for limited-English-speaking parents affects new teachers and a call for action.
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Comprehension: Do your English learners understand your instruction?
By Erick Herrmann
Every teacher intuitively knows the importance of student comprehension of instruction. Without comprehension, there is no learning. When teachers have the added challenge of working with students at varying English proficiency levels, they must find ways to lower the linguistic demand of the content, while keeping the academic rigor in place. Several key concepts and techniques can be used to help English learners comprehend to a greater degree in any classroom.
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The cultural impact on effective and ineffective reading strategies
By Ream Odetallah
Many teachers around the world are specialized in various teaching development programs, and many of these teachers encounter problems when implementing their expertise in classrooms. In most cases the teachers become bewildered when the results are not quite to their expectations. As a Middle Eastern senior English language teacher and trainer, I have come to observe these obstacles when moving from one country to another. The main problem is sticking to my own cultural-educational thoughts rather than taking into consideration my students' thoughts.
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MAP assessments: The new way to gauge potential
By Archita Datta Majumdar
Measures of Academic Progress assessments are fairly recent entrants to the wide world of standardized achievement tests but have quickly become the norm due to their deceptively simple yet effective ways to gauge student performance and inherent abilities. Like all other standardized tests, MAP aims to find out how well students will perform in their subsequent educational settings. Similar to other tests, it is also formulated in a standard format and predetermined manner. But there is one aspect where it differs from the others.
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Help or hindrance? Use of native language in the English classroom
By Erick Herrmann
The population of English learners in the U.S. has grown significantly over the past two decades, increasing by approximately 81 percent since 1990. This represents 25.3 million individuals, born abroad and in the United States, who are still developing English proficiency. In U.S. schools, teachers are faced with the challenge of teaching students both academic content and English at a variety of English proficiency levels, from beginners to fluent English speakers. The practice of allowing students to speak other languages in U.S. classrooms for or during instruction has been a controversial subject.
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Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


World Class: Be the Solution

In our TESOL/TFL programs, you’ll learn the world’s most important skills from our instructors: bringing people together through the power of a new language. MORE
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Teach with a purpose. SIT students learn to teach language for social change, advocacy, education, and empowerment through SIT’s online and on campus accredited master degree programs. MORE


Leadership lessons from the language classroom
By Andy Curtis
Although workplace bullying used to be thought of mainly in terms of bosses bullying employees, or bullying between employees, it is now becoming clear that some staff bully not only their colleagues but also their bosses. I want to focus on the more general disruptive behaviors of some staff in some language teaching organizations that make life difficult for everyone, especially those in leadership and management roles. Much of what we learn as classroom teachers can be applied outside the classroom.
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A gap in our field: Leadership in language education
By Andy Curtis
Books in our field on leadership and management are relatively rare, compared with books on methodology in TESOL, and compared with books on leadership and management in other fields, such as health care. Given the many thousands of language program administrators all over the world, it is surprising that there are not more books in this area. Many of us move from language teaching into language program administration almost "accidentally," and it may mean learning how to lead and manage from the periphery.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Literacy and Language Intervention Resources

Dr. Margarita Calderon’s RIGOR combines language-leveled informational texts with comprehensive literacy instruction to support language development for older newcomers and ELs reading at primary levels. K-8 Comprehension Skill Bags include nonfiction books and instructional resources needed to teach targeted skills. Both series are available in English or Spanish. FREE sampler.
 


Working memory in English language development
By Beth Crumpler
Working memory is crucial to learning. It is the human mind's processing of information to complete tasks. When people have problems with their working memory, they struggle with retaining information in the short term that is vital to learning in the long term. English language learners are extremely susceptible to deficiencies with working memory functionality due to the anxiety, fear and stress learning a second language can cause. Teachers of ELLs must keep vigilant watch for the signs of working memory struggles in students.
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Career tips for teaching ESL
By Archita Datta Majumdar
If there was ever any language that came close to being the Esperanto or the universal communicator, then English would be it. The 21st century has seen many path-breaking changes, one of which has been the rapid and deep outreach of English around the world. And with the opening of the global economy, English’s importance has risen as more and more businesses and nations come together to work in unison. This has given rise to the need for a global English curriculum and trained instructors for teaching English as a second language. No matter how academic it sounds, this holds the key to better business communication in the future.
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CAL Solutions: Boosting ELL Achievement

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Fostering STEM vocabulary development in ESL students
By Beth Crumpler
With the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, content-area literacy is a huge focus right now. The Common Core State Standards place development focus in the literacy of math and the literacy of science and technical subjects in English language arts. Science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) content areas are extremely technical and difficult for ESL students to understand. To meet the literacy objectives under the Common Core State Standards, ESL and content-area teachers must work together in teaching STEM content-area vocabulary.
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Teaching English is abstract science
By Ream Odetallah
The learning avenue has undergone various fluctuations in the past decades. People's indigenous charismas, mind functioning and future plans have one way or another contributed to the development of the styles of learning, especially with the high requirements of social networks in the lives of the learners. The impact is reflected in the learning goals and desires of an individual. Learning is no longer a the priority or the only priority in students' eventful lifestyles. Therefore, the learning goals of each person vary.
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The TESOL English Language Bulletin is presented as a service to members of TESOL International Association and other English language teaching professionals. For information about TESOL member benefits, visit www.tesol.org or contact us at membership@tesol.org.

TESOL English Language Bulletin is a digest of the most important news selected for TESOL International Association from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. TESOL International Association does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of TESOL.

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