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Hunters desired at Civil War battlefields overrun with deer
Smithsonian
Anntietam, Manassas and Monocacy battlefields were once the site of bloody battles during the American Civil War, but now they’ve been overrun by a different sort of invader: white-tailed deer. Already the bane of gardeners, white-tailed deer are now creating problems for vegetation at the historic locations, leading the National Parks Service to propose a $1.8 million plan to have sharpshooters kill up to 2,800 deer at the sites over the course of five years.
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New York state calling for early bear-hunting season to manage population
New York Daily News
New York state is loosening restrictions on bear hunting to limit the animals' population growth. The state Department of Environmental Conservation announced a new bear-management plan that calls for a special early bear-hunting season in September in areas of the Catskills and the western Hudson Valley region.
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African safari hunting: Blue wildebeest
By John McAdams
It has been quite a while since I've done an African animal profile. However, it's now the peak of the hunting season in most countries in Africa. In honor of this, I'll continue to post further profiles of African animals over the next few weeks. Perhaps these reports will inspire some readers to pursue dreams of hunting in Africa. Today, I'm writing about the bread and butter of almost any African plains game safari: the blue wildebeest.
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Deer numbers decline in some hunting areas
Fox News
So you're a member of a Louisiana deer-hunting club, and your harvest numbers are down. You and your lease mates used to see deer on just about every hunt, but now you're excited if you run across a decent-sized track. What's the smartest thing to do at that point?
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    WSF addresses Secretaries on bighorn and domestic sheep separation (U.S. Senate)
Task force formed to counter cyberthreats to hunters (U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance)
FWS ignores science in upholding elephant ban (Hunting Life)
South Dakota: Bighorn sheep to be matched with habitat near Deadwood (The Great Outdoors)
More opportunities for hunting bobcats in Utah while cougar numbers level (NRAblog)

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Study: 1 sit in the deer woods equals 3 days of pressure for mature bucks
Outdoor Life Magazine
Hunters know that putting too much pressure on whitetails can alter deer activity. We often hear that putting too much pressure on a mature buck makes it go nocturnal for the rest of the hunting season. But how much pressure is too much? In a recent study of South Carolina bucks, just a single day of light-impact hunting made bucks avoid the area for several days.
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Dove hunting gets research treatment
Houston Chronicle
Most of the nation's 1  million or so dove hunters are long on field experience and passion about their recreation, short on support of any moves to restrict use of the lead shot they almost universally employ and seemingly conflicted about how they and other dove hunters would react if faced with rules requiring use of non-lead shot. They also are, on average, more affluent, well-educated and older than the national average, take 30 or fewer doves over the course of a season and likely to also hunt big game such as deer.
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Hunters desired at Civil War battlefields overrun with deer
Smithsonian
Anntietam, Manassas and Monocacy battlefields were once the site of bloody battles during the American Civil War, but now they’ve been overrun by a different sort of invader: white-tailed deer.

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Task force formed to counter cyberthreats to hunters
U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance
Sportsmen, conservation organizations and outdoor personalities met at the U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance headquarters to develop strategies to counter the recent increase in cyberattacks on hunters.

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FWS ignores science in upholding elephant ban
Hunting Life
Safari Club International and millions of hunter conservationists worldwide are shocked and disappointed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decision to continue the ban on the importation of elephants from Zimbabwe for the rest of 2014.

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The .35 Remington: An underrated brush cartridge
By John McAdams
When it was introduced by the Remington Arms Company in 1906, the .35 Remington had no true peer among the cartridges of the day. Hunters seeking a good "brush bullet" found the .35 Remington to be a satisfactory choice, and many deer, bear, elk and even moose fell to the .35 Remington over the years. However, the intervening decades have not been kind to the cartridge, and the .35 Remington has fallen out of favor with most mainstream hunters.
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Oregon hunting guide pleads guilty to injuring wild cats for easy kill
Reuters via Thomson Reuters Foundation
An Oregon hunting guide accused of injuring or caging mountain lions and bobcats to make it easier for his clients to shoot and kill pleaded guilty in a U.S. Court in Denver to violating a federal wildlife law, prosecutors said. Nicholaus Rodgers of Shady Cove, Oregon, could face up to five years in prison and a maximum fine of $250,000 for the felony count of conspiring to violate the Lacey Act, which bans the transportation or sale across state lines of illegally gained wildlife, according to the U.S. Justice Department.
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Mountain Minutes
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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