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A message from the president
ADAA
ADAA’s Annual Conference convenes next week with a record-breaking number of participants. This conference is a source for world-class, cutting-edge research and training on anxiety disorders, OCD, PTSD and depression. Attending ADAA connects you with a global community that is committed to advancing the field and improving outcomes for all with these disorders. Join me, March 27-30, at the Chicago Marriott Downtown for the best educational event for those focusing on anxiety disorders and depression. Earn up to 29 CE or CME credits. Learn more and register.

Mark Pollack, M.D. – ADAA President
Rush University Medical Center

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Workshop on mental health in children and teens
ADAA and AKFSA
March 26, at 1 p.m.
Chicago Marriott
3 CE hours

More than one in eight children will be diagnosed with an anxiety or mood disorder. The most common mental illnesses, these are highly treatable with early diagnosis and intervention. Join colleagues and experts to discuss anxiety disorders and depression in children, adolescents and teens. The members of an expert panel will address what’s normal and what’s an anxiety disorder; identify early warning signs and focus on social anxiety disorder, a serious often-overlooked disorder.

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RESOURCES


DBT skills for children, teens and families
ADAA
Listen to a podcast by ADAA member Pat Harvey, LCSW describe dialectical behavior therapy or DBT, and how it can help family members of children, adolescents and adults who have intense emotions.
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RESEARCH AND PRACTICE NEWS


Antipsychotics tied to increased odds of gynecomastia
Medscape (free subscription)
An analysis of data from a large health plan database in the U.S. found that older men who took second-generation antipsychotic drugs risperidone or paliperidone were 69 percent more likely to develop gynecomastia than nonusers. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry.
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Chronic stress may jeopardize children's physical, mental health
HealthDay News
Children's exposure to three or more stressful events was associated with a sixfold increased risk of having physical or mental health issues or a learning disability, University of Florida researchers found. The study, based on data from the National Survey for Child Health involving almost 96,000 children, was presented at the American Psychosomatic Society meeting.
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Emotional stress linked to women's heart problems
Psych Central
Researchers have found that emotional stressors — such as those provoking anger — may cause changes in the nervous system that controls heart rate and trigger a type of coronary artery dysfunction that occurs more frequently in women than men. In men with coronary artery disease, the large arteries feeding the heart tend to become clogged by plaque, and these blockages are evident on coronary angiograms.
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Pediatric depression might be hard for parents to accept
VOXXI
Pediatric depression, or major depressive disorder in school-age children and adolescents, is a problem that not many people are familiar with, but is very real, and according to many studies appears to be rising. In an article published by “Scientific American,” one percent of babies, four percent of preschool-aged children, five percent of school-aged children and 11 percent of adolescents meet the criteria for major depression.
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Study: Boys report PTSD when moved out of poverty
NPR
In the 1990s, the U.S. government embarked on an ambitious social experiment to try to help people get out of poverty. The Moving to Opportunity Program gave housing vouchers to single mothers so they could raise their kids in areas with better job prospects and better schools. The hope was the families would thrive. Now a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that boys from these families did not thrive. They found that the move took a toll on their emotional well being, a toll not experienced by girls.
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CBT effective for body dysmorphic disorder?
The British Psychological Society
Patients with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) could benefit from being given cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as a form of treatment, a new study has suggested. Researchers at Rhode Island Hospital studied 36 adults with the condition - which causes sufferers to have a distorted view of how they look - and assigned them to either CBT sessions for 24 weeks or a 12-week waiting list. It was found that those in the former group experienced reduced BDD symptoms including depression and inaccurate beliefs, as well as enjoying an improvement in their social and family lives.
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First trial of LSD as medicine in 40 years shows promise
Los Angeles Times
For the first time in more than four decades, the drug lysergic acid diethylamide — better known as LSD — has been the experimental adjunct to psychotherapy in a controlled clinical trial approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. And a newly published study on that trial reports that the medication's anti-anxiety effects on patients facing life-threatening illnesses were sizable, sustained — and free of worrisome side effects.
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Postpartum: Program helps women fight depression
Go Upstate
Postpartum depression is depression that occurs after having a baby. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 8 percent to 19 percent of women report having frequent postpartum depressive symptoms, which include trouble sleeping, feeling numb, having scary or negative thoughts about the baby, or feeling guilty about not being a good mom.
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NHANES data link hearing impairment to higher depression rates in women
Healio
Adults diagnosed with hearing impairment are more likely to be diagnosed with depression, according to a study published in JAMA Otolaryngology — Head & Neck Surgery. Study findings showed that, although more men reported current hearing impairment, hearing-impaired women are at the greatest risk for a diagnosis of moderate to severe depression. Chuan-Ming Li, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues from NIH designed a nationally representative study on depression in hearing-impaired U.S. adults ages 18 years and older. Citing earlier research, they wrote that both “depression and hearing impairment have been associated with personal, societal and economic burden.”
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Cyberbullying 'causes suicidal thoughts in kids more than traditional bullying'
Medical News Today
Cyberbullying is more strongly related to suicidal thoughts in children and adolescents than traditional bullying, according to a new analysis published in JAMA Pediatrics. Some estimates suggest that - depending on the country of origin - between 5 percent and 20 percent of children are victims of physical, verbal or exclusion-based bullying. Previous studies have also confirmed that bullying is a strong risk factor for adolescent suicide.
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TMS relieves symptoms in teens with resistant depression
Medscape (free subscription)
Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) may help relieve symptoms in teens with treatment-resistant depression, new research suggests. Researchers also found that among responders, rTMS also raised levels of the neurotransmitter glutamate in the dorsolateral left prefrontal cortex. rTMS is a noninvasive intervention that uses a pulsating magnetic field applied to the scalp to induce electric currents in brain cortical neurons and thus modulate cortical excitability.
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Sociologist examines the ubiquity of shame and its role in aggression and depression
Medical Xpress
Shame on you. These three simple words can temporarily — or, when used too often, permanently — destroy an individual's sense of value and self-worth. "In modernity, shame is the most obstructed and hidden emotion, and therefore the most destructive," said Thomas Scheff, professor emeritus of sociology at UC Santa Barbara. "Emotions are like breathing — they cause trouble only when obstructed."
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New findings on chemical linked to bipolar psychosis
Psych Central
Researchers have discovered a gene that is likely to play a role in the risk of psychosis in bipolar disorders. The condition involves recurrent episodes of mania and depression, interspersed with “euthymic” periods with no depressive or manic symptoms. Manic episodes sometimes trigger psychotic symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions that are similar to acute psychosis in schizophrenia.
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Older Chinese adults with dementia and depression have a significantly higher risk of mortality
Medical Xpress
Older adults with dementia and depression living in rural China have a significantly higher risk of mortality than their urban counterparts, according to a new report by U.K. and Chinese scientists. The study, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, found that individuals in rural areas with dementia had a three times higher risk of mortality compared to those in urban areas. For people with depression in rural areas there was about a four times greater risk of mortality.
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Emory study links depression to arterial stiffness during stress
Health Canal
According to a study by researchers at Emory's Rollins School of Public Health, symptoms of depression are associated with an increase in arterial stiffness induced by mental stress. Arterial stiffness indicates a reduced capability of an artery to expand and contract in response to blood pressure change. It is an important indicator of future cardiovascular events and has been shown to worsen during stressful conditions.
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Cognitive behavioral therapy improved treatment adherence, HbA1c in diabetes, depression
Healio
Immediately after treatment with specialized cognitive behavioral therapy, patients with Type 2 diabetes and depression showed greater medication adherence and a higher level of blood glucose control, and the improvements were maintained for 12 months. In a study conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital, researchers enrolled 87 adults with poorly controlled Type 2 diabetes who also met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) criteria for unipolar depression. All participants received enhanced treatment for medication adherence, self-monitoring blood glucose and lifestyle counseling.
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Training boosts GP confidence in ability to prevent suicide
Medscape (free subscription)
A short training program for general practitioners (GPs) can help reshape GPs' attitudes about depression and make them more confident in their ability to treat depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts, new research shows. A multinational European study led by Evelien Coppens, Ph.D., of the Policy Research Center for Welfare, Public Health and Family at the University of Leuven, Belgium, described the Optimizing Suicide Prevention Programs and their Implementation in Europe, a collaboration in 11 countries funded by the European Commission to develop an intervention strategy for the prevention of suicide.
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About Anxiety & Depression Insights
ADAA
This news brief is a timely update about anxiety disorders and depression sent to members of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and other professionals interested in this area. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of the reader. External resources are not a part of the ADAA website, and ADAA is not responsible for the content of external sites. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by ADAA of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site. For more information about ADAA, visit www.ADAA.org.
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