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Revised theory of gravity doesn't predict a Big Bang
PhysOrg    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Physicists have resurrected a theory of gravity proposed by Arthur Eddington as an alternative to Einstein's General Relativity. Although Eddington's theory proved unsuccessful, a modified version may offer answers for some outstanding astrophysics questions. Read the associated Physical Review Letters article. More



Dark matter may be building up inside the sun
Wired    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The sun could be a net for dark matter, a new study suggests. If dark matter happens to take a certain specific form, it could build up in our nearest star and alter how heat moves inside it in a way that would be observable from Earth. Read the associated Physical Review Letters article. More

Scientists prove cosmic rays are made of protons
The Minneapolis Post    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Cosmic rays are made of protons, scientists found as they used a vast array of telescopes arranged across the Utah desert.  Each telescope in the 67-unit arrangement sees the sky with a multifaceted eye. It's no wonder they call it Fly's Eye. Read the associated Physical Review Letters article. More

Energy secretary advances nano science in spare time
The Associated Press via Google    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Some people relax by doing crossword puzzles, watching movies or reading a good book. In his down time, often while flying somewhere, Energy Secretary Steven Chu relaxes by tackling a scientific conundrum and stretching the limits of technology. More



Black hole blows huge gas bubble
BBC    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A small black hole has been observed blowing a vast bubble of hot gas 1,000 light-years across. The gas is expanding because it is being heated by powerful particle "jets" being released by the black hole. The observations were made by the Very Large Telescope in Chile and Nasa's Chandra space observatory. More

New proton measurements may throw physics a curve
Ars Technica    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
We may have been overestimating the proton for the last 60 years, if a new experiment has anything to say about it. A group of researchers have tried a new method of measuring the proton's radius that involved getting a muon to orbit it instead of an electron. More

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Taming turbulence from afar
ScienceNews    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
With just a single measurement, a new model may deftly describe turbulent fluid flows near an airplane wing, ship hull or cloud, researchers report in the July 9 Science. If the long-sought model proves successful, it may lead to more efficient airplanes, better ways to curb pollution dispersal and more accurate weather forecasts.     More

Law of hurricane power discovered
NewScientist    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The intensity of hurricanes follows a simple mathematical law -- a finding that could help us predict how they will respond to climate change. More

Physics major has a name for a really big number
The Los Angeles Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
When Austin Sendek was growing up in Northern California, he was never allowed to use the regional slang term "hella." Now the 20-year-old physics major at UC Davis uses "hella" often -- and he's trying to get scientists from Boise to Beijing to do the same. Sendek, who was forced to use "hecka" as a child, has petitioned an international scientific body to make "hella" the name for the hitherto nameless, unimaginably huge, seldom-cited quantity of 10 to the 27th power -- or 1 followed by 27 zeros. More

 
 

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