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A new clue to explain existence
The New York Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Physicists at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are reporting that they have discovered a new clue that could help unravel one of the biggest mysteries of cosmology: why the universe is composed of matter and not its evil-twin opposite, antimatter. If confirmed, the finding portends fundamental discoveries at the new Large Hadron Collider outside Geneva, as well as a possible explanation for our own existence. Read the associated APS Physics Viewpoint article. More

Antenna directs light at the nanoscale
Physics World    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail
article
Nanotechnology offers the promise of a new wave of sensors and optical components, but the tiny sizes involved can make it difficult for users to exchange information with these devices. Now, researchers in Spain have demonstrated a novel solution to this problem that involves fixing an "antenna" to nanoscale objects that can send and receive optical data with high precision. More

Lasers could make virtual particles real
Gizmodo    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Next-generation lasers will have the power to create matter by capturing ghostly particles that, according to quantum mechanics, permeate seemingly empty space. Read the associated Physical Review Letters article. More



Solar System older than previously thought
Nature News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A meteorite found in the Sahara Desert has helped to pin down the age of the Solar System and shed light on how it may have formed. The new estimate, which comes from measuring the ratios of lead isotopes inside the chondrite -- an ancient stony meteorite -- suggests that the Solar System is 4.568 billion years old. More

First gold-iron alloy shows power of magnetic attraction
NewScientist    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Gold readily forms alloys with the precious metals silver and palladium, but it normally blends with cheap iron about as well as oil mixes with water. That has now changed, with the creation of a gold-iron alloy that is held together by magnetism. Read the associated Physical Review Letters article. More

How collapsing bubbles could shoot cancer cells dead
NewScientist    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Jets of fluid propelled by the collapse of microscopic bubbles could deliver drugs directly into cancer cells, if an idea from a team of engineers pays off. They have made the bubbles project a fine jet that is powerful enough to puncture the cell wall and enter the cell. Read the associated APS Physics Viewpoint article More

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Making light work of LED droop
NewScientist    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The drive to bring eco-friendly LED lighting into our homes is being stopped in its tracks by an embarrassing problem known as droop -- the disappointing reduction in efficiency that happens when the light bulbs operate at the high power levels they need to shine at their brightest. More

Self-cleaning solar panels could find use in the dusty environs of Arizona, the Middle East or Mars
Scientific American    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The best places to collect solar energy are also some of the dustiest on Earth and beyond, a quandary that leads to inefficiencies in how well the cells are able to convert strong sunlight into renewable electricity. The solution, according to new research, is to coat solar cells with material that enables them to chase away dirt particles on their own with the help of dust-repelling electrical charges. More



Gravitational lens makes dark energy less mysterious
Ars Technica    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
New measurements of the gravity-induced distortions of celestial images are putting tighter limits on the amount of dark energy, the mysterious agent responsible for the acceleration of the expansion of the universe. More

Chlorophyll gets an 'f'
Science News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A new kind of chlorophyll that catches sunlight from just beyond the red end of the visible light spectrum has been discovered. The new pigment extends the known range of light that is usable by most photosynthetic organisms. Harnessing this pigment's power could lead to biofuel-generating algae that are super-efficient, using a greater spread of sunlight than thought possible. More

 
 

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