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Home   About AST   Education   Meetings & Events   Public Policy   Contact Us   Jan. 24, 2014


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SOCIETY NEWS


Ends today: Discounted registration and hotel rates for CEOT
AST
Register for the Cutting Edge of Transplantation (CEOT) in Chandler, Ariz., to secure your spot at this intimate meeting that focuses on long-term graft survival. Come for the science, stay for the sun! Scientific evidence shows that effective learning happens when the brain has time to rest. This program is built to allow you to step away and absorb the content. Use the recess time to relax and regenerate before returning for evening sessions. There's a multitude of both on-site activities and things to do in the local area. Take a hike along the hotel's walking trail or consider a kayaking or hiking adventure with our Arizona Outback Adventures partner. Get some retail therapy at the nearby outlets or just relax by the pool.

More than 30 talks tackle the problem of long-term graft survival through new technology, targets and therapeutics. Here's a few:
  • Technology and the Future of Personalized Medicine
  • Did Our Drugs 'Fail Our Patients' or Did Our Trials ‘Fail Our Drugs'?
  • Targeting Fibrosis Clinically: Can We Extend Results in Liver to Solid Organ Transplantation?
  • "Go with Your Gut:" How Far Can You Go with Changing Your Microbiome?
  • Fibrosis and EMT: Is It a Marker, Is It a Target, or Is It Just "Noise?"
  • Microbiomes, Antimicrobial Peptides and Human Disease
  • What is the Best Approach to Using Bone Marrow Transplantation to Enhance Long-term Survival?
  • Why Aren't We Using All the Molecular Diagnostic Tools We Keep Hearing About?
This activity is jointly sponsored by Global Education Group and the American Society of Transplantation. Continuing education credit will be offered for physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and transplant coordinators. Click here for full credit details. For information about accreditation of this program, please contact Global at 303-395-1782 or inquire@globaleducationgroup.com.

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Become an AST Corporate Affiliate
AST
The AST Corporate Affiliates Program provides an exciting opportunity for companies to support the work of the AST and receive tangible benefits throughout the year.

Benefits of participation include increased visibility, enhanced engagement opportunities, access to new marketing tools, and up-to-date communication about the latest research and advocacy efforts in the field of transplantation. In addition to these benefits, companies participating in this program are invited to meet annually with senior AST leadership to engage in strategic discussions about key issues impacting the field of transplantation.

Click here for additional information, or contact Liz Piegzik, Associate Meeting Manager, at lpiegzik@myAST.org.

AST thanks the following companies for their participation in the 2014 Corporate Affiliates Program:
    Genentech, A Member of the Roche Group
    Novartis Pharmaceuticals
    Roche Diagnostics Corporation
    Veloxis Pharmaceuticals

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Participate in the AST Institutional Support Program
AST
The AST offers numerous programs for transplant professionals and the support of the community is critically important to the success of the society's programs. By participating in the Institutional Support Program, your center's tax-deductible contribution of $3,000 will increase exposure for your center through electronic marketing, literature, and signage displays, as well as these other valuable benefits. In addition, your institution will be seen throughout the transplant community as having a vested interest in advancing the field of transplantation and improving patient care. Click here to participate in AST's Institutional Support Program, or contact Liz Piegzik, AST Associate Meeting Manager at lpiegzik@myAST.org.

AST thanks the following organizations for their participation in the 2014 Institutional Support Program:
    University of Michigan Transplant Center
    Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  UCLA Immunogenetics Center

The UCLA Immunogenetics Center (UIC) provides comprehensive testing for organ and tissue transplantation. Transplant testing has a long history at UCLA. HLA typing was pioneered here in the 1960's. The development of the microcytoxicity test in 1964 marked the beginning of international testing and standardization of HLA typing. The UCLA Immunogenetics Center has retained its leadership position in HLA research, and in the development of accompanying diagnostic testing. MORE
 


TRANSPLANT NEWS


Successful treatment for graft-versus-host disease after pancreas transplantation
Clinical Transplantation (login required)
Graft-versus-host disease after pancreas transplantation is a rare but serious complication: All previously reported cases were fatal. This study reports three cases of GVHD after pancreas transplantation with favorable outcomes. Patients with a history of kidney (and pancreas) transplantation subsequently received a pancreas (and kidney) transplantation (i.e., pancreas retransplantation or pancreas after kidney transplantation) and developed acute GVHD.
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Acute cellular rejection: Impact of donor-specific antibodies and C4d
Transplantation (login required)
Mixed rejection in kidney transplantation consists of histologic and/or serological evidence of both cellular and humoral components. As it is not confined to a distinct category in the Banff classification, how to best manage these patients is not clear. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and outcome of morphological T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) with a humoral component, defined as the presence of either DSA or C4d, compared with the outcome of pure TCMR.
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Utility of an immune cell function assay to differentiate rejection from infectious enteritis in pediatric intestinal transplant recipients
Clinical Transplantation (login required)
The Cylex Immune Cell Function Assay measures cell-mediated immunity based on ATP production by stimulated CD4+ cells. Authors of this study hypothesized that this test would discriminate acute cellular rejection from infectious enteritis in pediatric intestinal transplant recipients with allograft dysfunction.
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Living donor liver transplantation for obese patients: Challenges and outcomes
Liver Transplantation (login required)
Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is an accepted option for end-stage liver disease, particularly in countries in which there are organ shortages. However, little is known about LDLT for obese patients. Authors of this study sought to determine the effects of obesity on pretransplant living donor selection for obese recipients and their outcomes.
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To find out how to feature your company in the AST eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Tom Crist at 972-402-7724.
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Monocytic suppressor cells derived from human peripheral blood suppress xenogenic immune reactions
Xenotransplantation (login required)
Myeloid-derived suppressor cells were initially found to contribute to the immunosuppression in tumor patients and have recently been recognized as a subset of innate immune cells that are capable of regulating adaptive immunity. A variety of innate immune stimuli such as Lipopolysaccharide, which act as a double-edged sword, induce both the maturation of dendritic cells and the expansion of MDSCs.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The equitable allocation of deceased donor lungs for transplant in children in the United States (American Journal of Transplantation)
Innate immune cells in transplantation (Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation)
Serum iron parameters in the early post-transplant period and infection risk in kidney transplant recipients (Transplant Infectious Disease)
Treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection: Some remaining obstacles in the United States (Liver International)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
 
Astellas is entering its 20th year focusing on transplant immunology. Today we remain steadfast in our commitment to advancing the field. Tomorrow we will seek new possibilities to help improve the transplant experience. Together. Please visit astellas.us
 


Dendritic cells of myeloid lineage: the masterminds behind acute allograft rejection
Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation (login required)
Advances in surgery, patient management and pharmacologic immunosuppression have reduced the incidence of acute allograft rejection. However, generation of therapies to promote donor-specific immunosuppression with minimal side-effects has proved to be a difficult task. To some extent, this is because of our limited knowledge on how Ag-presenting cells (APCs) like dendritic cells initiate and maintain the antidonor response in vivo. Herein, authors link the classic concepts on the role of donor's dendritic cells as passenger leukocytes with the state-of-the-art findings in the field.
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Trends and patterns in patient safety report to OPTN
By Sharee Ann Narciso
A comprehensive report on patient safety situations was sent to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network and is now accessible for public review. It was prepared at the request of both OPTN and the Operations and Safety Committee of the United Network for Organ Sharing. The report is a summary of safety situations that were gathered through the UNet Improving Patient Safety online portal and other sources. The analysis of the safety issues reported since June 2013 reveals that 23 percent of all issues involved communication breakdown.
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T-cell migration to vascularized organ allografts
Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation (login required)
To review the classical paradigm of leukocyte migration and present new evidence that cognate antigen, and not signaling via Gαi-coupled chemokine receptors, drives the migration of effector and memory T cells into vascularized organ transplants.
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Comparison of porcine endogenous retroviruses infectious potential in supernatants of producer cells and in cocultures
Xenotransplantation (login required)
Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) pose a zoonotic risk potential in pig-to-human xenotransplantation given that PERV capacity to infect different human cell lines in vitro has been clearly shown in the past. However, PERV infectious potential for human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (huPBMC) has been also demonstrated, albeit with controversial results. As productive PERV infection of huPBMC involves immune suppression that may attract opportunistic pathogens as shown for other retroviruses, it is crucial to ascertain unequivocally huPBMC susceptibility for PERV. To address this question, authors first investigated in vitro infectivity of PERV for huPBMC using supernatants containing highly infectious PERV-A/C. Second, huPBMC were cocultivated with PERV-A/C producer cells to come a step closer to the in vivo situation of xenotransplantation. In addition, cocultivation of huPBMC with porcine PBMC (poPBMC) isolated from German landrace pigs was performed to distinguish PERV replication competence when they were constitutively produced by immortalized cells or by primary poPBMC.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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