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Only a few days left: Register now for the AST Fellows Symposium on Transplantation
The AST Fellows Symposium, held Sept.20-22, in Grapevine, Texas, offers an in-depth and interactive study of both clinical transplantation and basic transplant immunobiology while offering unparalleled access to expert faculty. Registration and travel grant requests must be received by Wednesday, July 31. View the full registration and travel grant eligibility requirements and register here. This activity has been approved for 15.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

For information about the accreditation of this program, contact Global at 303-395-1782 or at inquire@globaleducationgroup.com.

This activity is jointly sponsored by Global Education Group and American Society of Transplantation.


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SOCIETY NEWS


Save the date for AST's Cutting Edge of Transplantation 2014
Optimizing Long-term Transplant Survival: Therapeutics, Targets and Technologies
Come to Arizona next February for the AST's Cutting Edge of Transplantation where expert clinicians, leading diagnosticians and world class scientists will address this enormous challenge together with an engaged audience. Topics include: Organ preservation and injury prevention, chronic injury and tolerance, immunosuppression, inflammation and fibrosis as targets, microbiomes, senescence and omics in the clinic. Abstract submission will open later this summer.

When: Feb. 13-16, 2014
Where: Sheraton Wild Horse Pass, Chandler, Ariz.

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Conversations with the president: 'It's Organ Donation Stupid'
In the first of a three-part series, the AST's newest president, Dr. Daniel Salomon, reminds us that the simplest message — "it's organ donation stupid" — is a critical starting point to examine and bring light to the political, legal and ethical considerations challenging organ allocation in America. Read the full blog post here.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  University of Utah - Multi-Organ Transplant Surgeon
The University Of Utah Department Of Surgery is seeking applications for a faculty member to join the multi-organ transplant team at the assistant professor level. This is an opportunity to join an expanding program and a cohesive group of transplant surgeons focused on excellence. The candidate should be board certified in general surgery and have completed an ASTS approved transplantation surgery fellowship. Apply here
 


Wanted: Your nominations for the 2014 AST Board
Dr. Roslyn Mannon, chair of the AST Governance Committee, invites AST members to submit nominations for qualified individuals to serve on the AST Board of Directors. Open positions include president-elect (one year term), Treasurer (two year term), and three councilors-at-large (three year terms each). Read the official announcement here.
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TRANSPLANT NEWS


Parenchymal alterations in cirrhotic livers in patients with hepatopulmonary syndrome or portopulmonary hypertension
Liver Transplantation (login required)
Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) and portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) are distinct pulmonary vascular complications of cirrhosis. Little is known about possible associated hepatic histopathological features. Explanted livers from patients clinically diagnosed with HPS (n = 8) or PPH (n = 7) and cirrhotic explants from controls (n = 30) without HPS or PPH were evaluated with trichrome histochemistry, anti–glutamine synthetase (anti-GS), and anti-CD34 immunohistochemistry (IHC).
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Report: Decreasing incidence of symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus, posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder in pediatric liver transplant
Liver Transplantation (login required)
Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) causes significant morbidity and mortality in pediatric recipients of liver transplantation (LT). The objective of a recent study was to describe the incidence of PTLD and symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus (SEBV) disease in a large multicenter cohort of children who underwent LT with a focus on the risk factors and changes in incidence over time.
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Eye receptor transplants may restore eyesight to the blind
NewScientist
For the first time, the light-sensing cells found in the retina have been grown from scratch in the lab, and then successfully transplanted into the eyes of blind mice. The transplanted cells successfully matured and connected with nerves that transmit visual signals to the brain. Researchers say that if the procedure can be repeated with human stem cells, they believe they can cure most forms of blindness that result from degeneration of these photoreceptor cells, due to either the effects of ageing or diseases like diabetes.
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Portal vein arterialization using an accessory right hepatic artery in liver transplantation
Liver Transplantation (login required)
Portal vein thrombosis remains to be a challenging issue during liver transplantation even with the acquisition of innovative surgical techniques and years of experience. Most frequently, an initial eversion thromboendovenectomy is performed and depending on the extent of thrombosis and intraoperative findings, further revascularization options include venous jump grafts, portocaval hemitransposition, renoportal anastomosis or portal vein arterialization.
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Effects of ureteral stents on risk of bacteriuria in renal allograft recipients
Transplant Infectious Disease
Placement of ureteral stents at the time of renal transplantation is thought to decrease the incidence of postoperative complications, such as anastomotic leakage and stenosis. However, stents may also predispose to posttransplantation urinary tract infection, which can lead to increased risks of graft dysfunction, sepsis, and death. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk of posttransplantation bacteriuria with ureteral stent placement in renal allograft recipients.
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Trial: Calcineurin inhibitor-free mycophenolate mofetil/sirolimus maintenance in liver transplantation
Liver Transplantation (login required)
Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and sirolimus (SRL) have been used for calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) minimization to reduce nephrotoxicity following liver transplantation. In this prospective, open-label, multicenter study, patients undergoing transplantation from July 2005 to June 2007 who were maintained on MMF/CNI were randomized 4 to 12 weeks after transplantation to receive MMF/SRL (n = 148) or continue MMF/CNI (n = 145) and included in the intent-to-treat population.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The prognostic value of kidney transplant center report cards (American Journal of Transplantation (login required))
Organ allocation: What is just and fair? (By Dorothy L. Tengler)
Excellent liver retransplantation outcomes in hepatitis C-infected recipients (Clinical Transplantation (login required))
Trial: Conversion from twice-Daily tacrolimus capsules to once-daily extended-release tacrolimus (Transplantation)
Mesenchymal stem cells in organ transplantation (By Maria Frisch)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Obese kidney patients benefit from transplants
MedPage Today (login required)
Obese renal failure patients who have a body mass index under 40 derive the same overall survival benefit from kidney transplantation as non-obese patients, researchers found
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Continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in kidney-transplanted children
Pediatric Transplantation (login required)
NODAT and IGT are well-known complications of immunosuppressive therapy after transplantation being a risk factor for cardiovascular disease affecting patient and graft survival. Therefore, early identification and treatment are of high importance. This study examines the glycemic homeostasis of 20 renal-transplanted children using routine laboratory tests and the continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). Six patients (30 percent) had IGT, and one patient had NODAT (5 percent).
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