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Home   About AST   Education   Meetings & Events   Public Policy   Contact Us   Oct. 11, 2013


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SOCIETY NEWS


Register now for the T3 live webinar Series: Starting Oct.15
AST
The Timely Topics in Transplantation webinar series kicks off next Tuesday, Oct. 15, at 2 p.m. EST with "Banff Conference on Allograft Pathology: 2013 Summary.” Register now for this free webinar–just use your AST username and password during registration! Non-members may purchase access to webinars for a fee of $25 each.
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It's time to renew your membership!
AST
To continue receiving all of the benefits AST membership has to offer in 2014, login to the AST website now to pay your dues. If you have forgotten your login credentials, simply click "Forgot Password" to have the information emailed to you. Contact the AST office at info@myAST.org with any questions. Members will receive a hard-copy invoice via regular mail in the near future.
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AST Institutional Support Program
AST
  • Are you interested in receiving recognition and increased exposure for your transplant center?
  • Does your center support the future of transplantation and value the educational, networking and research opportunities that the American Society of Transplantation (AST) provides to its members?
  • Does your center support AST's lobbying of the U.S. Congress and Federal Agencies to secure a more transplant provider friendly environment for patients and physicians?
If the answer to these questions is YES, please consider having your center participate in AST’s 2014 Institutional Support Program. With a charitable contribution of $3,000 to support AST's research, professional education and advocacy programs, your center will receive valuable benefits, including:
  • Quarterly acknowledgement in the American Journal of Transplantation on the support recognition page
  • Recognition on the AST website with a link to your center's website
  • One time use of the AST membership mailing list (mailing piece must be approved)
  • Opportunity to display literature at the AST 2014 Fellows Symposium
  • One time job listing on the AST Career Center
  • Recognition via signage at the AST booth at the American Transplant Congress
  • Certificate of Recognition
All donations are tax-deductible. For more information about participating in AST's Institutional Support Program, click click here or contact Ms. Sylvia Bastani, Director of Development, at sbastani@myAST.org

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  UCLA Immunogenetics Center

The UCLA Immunogenetics Center (UIC) provides comprehensive testing for organ and tissue transplantation. Transplant testing has a long history at UCLA. HLA typing was pioneered here in the 1960's. The development of the microcytoxicity test in 1964 marked the beginning of international testing and standardization of HLA typing. The UCLA Immunogenetics Center has retained its leadership position in HLA research, and in the development of accompanying diagnostic testing. MORE
 


In memory of AST Member Cynthia Cohen
AST
Cynthia Cohen has been involved in transplantation since 1991 and was a Lead Liver Transplant Nurse Practitioner and Hand/Face Transplant Coordinator at Johns Hopkins Hospital. "She was instrumental in helping our team establish the VCA programs at Johns Hopkins, and played a critical role in coordinating candidate screening, surgery and post-transplant monitoring," said Dr. W. P. Andrew Lee, program director. "We were fortunate in working with such a dedicated professional, and will greatly miss her energy and wit."

Cynthia first became a member of the AST in 2008 and joined the Liver and Intestinal Community of Practice and the Transplant Diagnostic Community of Practice in 2010. Cynthia was selected to become a leader within the society when she was named member-at-large of the AST Vascular Composite Allotransplantation Advisory Council in 2013. She was active in advisory council's initiatives that included advocacy for VCA standard of care by CMS. Her service and input were greatly appreciated and will be wholly missed in the AST community.

Memorial contributions be made to Johns Hopkins Stepping Stones, a fund to support transplant patients and families. Checks should be made payable to Johns Hopkins University and mailed to the attention of: Brigitte Sullivan, Comprehensive Transplant Center, 600 N. Wolfe St., Baltimore, MD 21287.

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TRANSPLANT NEWS


Gender issues in solid organ donation and transplantation
NCBI
Gender as a critical, intrinsic, non-immunologic factor plays a pivotal role in the field of transplantation. The gender of donors and recipients is involved in the entire process, including organ donation and transplant surgery. This review article aims to summarize the literature related to the role of gender in solid organ donation and transplantation and to unveil the underlying mechanism by which gender mismatch between donor and recipient impacts transplant rejection.
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New method may improve face transplant matches
Newsday
Face transplants — some with remarkable results — are increasingly becoming an option for people with devastating burns and other severe facial injuries. A new study finds that measuring five specific facial landmarks before the surgery may help better match donors and recipients. "Although there have been many advances made in facial transplantation, reproducible methods of predicting donor-to-recipient match would be very useful, as it can take many months to locate an appropriate donor," study co-author Dr. Bohdan Pomahac said in an American Society of Plastic Surgeons news release.
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Trial: Transplanting the highly sensitized patient
NCBI
Humoral sensitization to antigens of the human leukocyte antigen and ABO systems remains one of the largest barriers to further expansion in renal transplantation. This barrier translates into prolonged waiting time and a greater likelihood of death. The number of highly sensitized patients on the renal transplant waiting list continues to increase. This review focuses on the options available to these patients and speculates on future directions for incompatible transplantation.
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Low incidence of pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in an unprophylaxed liver transplant cohort
Transplant Infectious Disease (login required)
Liver transplant recipients are managed with a range of immunosuppressive regimens that place them at heightened risk of life-threatening opportunistic infections such as Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP). No routine PJP prophylaxis is used at out institution. We reviewed the incidence of PJP in this cohort of unprophylaxed liver transplant recipients.
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Pretransplant sensitization against angiotensin II type 1 receptor is a riskfactor for acute rejection and graft loss
American Journal of Transplantation
The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is an emerging target of functional non-HLA antibodies (Ab). We examined the potential of determining the degree of presensitization against AT1R as a risk factor for graft survival and acute rejection (AR). The study included 599 kidney recipients between 1998 and 2007. Serum samples were analyzed in a blinded fashion for anti-AT1R antibodies (AT1R-Abs) using a quantitative solid-phase assay.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    AST Public Policy Committee Members Deliver Key Messages Directly to Decision-Makers on Capitol Hill (AST)
Analysis: Expedited liver allocation in the United States (Liver Transplantation (login required))

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Lower socioeconomic status is associated with worse outcomes after both listing and transplanting children with heart failure
Pediatric Transplantation (login required)
The relationship between SES and outcomes surrounding pediatric cardiac transplantation is complex and influenced by recipient race. Broad-based studies of SES have not been performed. A retrospective review of all 5125 primary pediatric heart transplants performed in the United States between 2000 and 2011.
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Survey: Screening recipients of increased-risk donor organs
Transplant Infectious Disease (login required)
In 1994, the Public Health Service published guidelines to minimize the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission and to monitor recipients following the transplantation of organs from increased-risk donors. A 2007 survey revealed the post-transplant surveillance of recipients of organs from increased-risk donors (ROIRD) is variable.
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