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  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Jan. 30, 2013

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The Lab Man interviews SLAS2013 Student Poster Award winners
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Forty-five students traveled to SLAS2013 from 12 countries to present their work as part of the SLAS Tony B. Academic Travel Awards program and the SLAS Young Scientist Awards program. Three posters earned top honors for innovation and excellence — Kamran Honarnejad of the University of Munich, Michael T. Jacobs of The University of Texas at Dallas and Yang Wu of the University of New Mexico. Listen to what they told The Lab Man about their winning posters and their careers. More

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SLAS2014 keynote speaker says personalized, wireless medicine is here
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Physician Eric Topol was featured on NBC's Rock Center with Brian Williams last week, exploring new tools available — many utilizing smartphones — to help doctors work more closely with their patients. When talking about the current state of health care, Topol states, "It's really medicine dumbed down. It's treating all human beings the same. That's crazy. Each of us is truly unique in every way." Topol is director, Scripps Translational Science Institute; chief academic officer, Scripps Health; and professor of Genomics, The Scripps Research Institute. More

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SLAS2013 ePoster Gallery open
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At your convenience, revisit the nearly 400 new ideas presented in the SLAS2013 posters. Browse or search by presenter name, poster title or subject area. The gallery is available for free, 24/7/365. More

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SLAS New Product Award designation winners talk with The Lab Man
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The Andrew, GenCell GT-Series and LumaSpec800 were recognized as the best new products on the SLAS2013 exhibit floor. Learn more about them by listening to The Lab Man’s podcasts with Pierro Zucchelli, CEO of Andres Alliance; Brian Barrett, senior project manager of GenCell Biosystems; and Thomas Freda, president and CEO of Prior Scientific. More


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JALA Online features new manuscripts ahead-of-print
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"Evaluation of a Liquid Dispenser for Assay Development and Enzymology in 1536-Well Format" and "Evaluation of the Fully Automated Hematological Analyzer Sysmex XE-5000 for Flow Cytometric Analysis of Peritoneal Fluid" are among the new manuscripts available right now to SLAS Laboratory Automation Section members. More


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Take a five-minute break ...
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Need a fun, yet encouraging, break from your work today? Scan the SLAS channel on YouTube for some short videos from SLAS2013. More

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Researchers uncover protein's job protecting pneumonia-causing pathogen from copper poisoning
Phys.org    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A team of chemists and biologists led by Indiana University chemistry professor David Giedroc has described a previously unknown function of a protein they now know is responsible for protecting a major bacterial pathogen from toxic levels of copper. The results were published Jan. 27 in Nature Chemical Biology. More



Mutations found in melanomas may shed light on how cancers grow
The New York Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
In a leap forward in understanding the basic science of one of the most lethal cancers, two groups of researchers have found mutations in most melanomas that are unlike any they have seen before in cancer. The changes are in regions that control genes, not in the genes themselves. The mutations are exactly the type caused by exposure to ultraviolet light, indicating they might be among the first DNA changes in a cell's path to melanoma. More

Putting the squeeze on cells
MIT    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Living cells are surrounded by a membrane that tightly regulates what gets in and out of the cell. This barrier is necessary for cells to control their internal environment, but it makes it more difficult for scientists to deliver large molecules such as nanoparticles for imaging, or proteins that can reprogram them into pluripotent stem cells. Researchers from MIT have now found a safe and efficient way to get large molecules through the cell membrane. More


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Drug reduces enlarged prostate with few side effects
NewScientist    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Relief from the constant call of nature is the aim of a new drug, tested in rats, which can shrink an enlarged prostate and is likely to have few side effects. By the age of 60 an estimated 70 percent of men have prostate enlargement. Treatment involves surgery or drugs that block testosterone, a hormone that drives unwanted growth. More

Bacteria in Earth's atmosphere may affect cloud formation and climate
Popular Science    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Vast populations of microbes live between four and six miles above the Earth's surface in the upper troposphere, an atmospheric zone considered at best a pretty lousy location for life. They might be living at those altitudes and feasting on carbon compounds that are helping warm the planet, or perhaps they were lofted up there by air currents, according to a new study. More

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Single molecule dynamics at a mechanically controllable break junction in solution at room temperature
Journal of the American Chemical Society    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The in situ observation of geometrical and electronic structural dynamics of a single molecule junction is critically important in order to further progress in molecular electronics. Observations of single molecular junctions are difficult, however, because of sensitivity limits. More

The rise of superbugs called 'apocalyptic scenario'
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A prominent British health official has declared the rise of antibiotic-resistant superbugs so grave a threat that the world is now facing an "apocalyptic scenario" in which people die of routine infections. Dame Sally Davies, the U.K.'s chief medical officer (a role equivalent to the U.S. surgeon general), warned Parliament that contagious antibiotic-resistant disease is an imminent crisis. More

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One in, two out: Simulating more efficient solar cells
ScienceDaily    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Using an exotic form of silicon could substantially improve the efficiency of solar cells, according to computer simulations by researchers at the University of California, Davis, and in Hungary. The work was published Jan. 25 in the journal Physical Review Letters. More

Genevac offers technical article on high-throughput natural product discovery
Genevac    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Natural product derived discovery of novel flavor molecules is a highly complex process. Natural product sources yield complex extracts containing many components, which often do not lend themselves to processing and analysis. Conventionally, many steps of fractionation and evaluation are necessary until a compound is obtained from natural sources at the purity required for structural analysis. In the article, a state of the art fractionation process is described. More


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Career


Senior Staff Scientist, Enzymology
ARIAD Pharmaceuticals
USA – MA – Cambridge

Assistant Director, Infectious Disease Diagnostic
North Shore-LIJ Health System
USA – NY – Lake Success

Grant Writer
Douglas Scientific
USA – MN – Alexandria

More jobs at SLAS Career Connections


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