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SLAS Announces Inaugural Americas Regional Council
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This Council made up of seven life science research and development professionals, representing both technology users and providers, is chartered to provide leadership and guidance to the Society's activities and operations in the Americas.
The members of the inaugural SLAS Americas Regional Council include:
  • Tyler Aldredge, Quintiles Transnational
  • John Thomas Bradshaw, Artel
  • Hansjoerg Haas, Thermo Fisher Scientific
  • Catherine Klapperich, Boston University
  • Craig Schulz, Amgen
  • Sara Thrall, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Aaron Wheeler, University of Toronto
In concert with councils from Europe and Asia, SLAS now has active regional leadership councils on three continents.
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SLAS ELN Reports: Global Health — Putting Passion to Work with Novel Point-of-Care Diagnostics
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"I'm passionate about global health, about my own research to develop technologies for use in resource-limited settings, as well as the work that others are doing to improve the lives of people in developing countries," says Peter Lillehoj, Ph.D., of Michigan State University in East Lansing.

That passion motivated Lillehoj to serve as guest editor of the JALA special issue on New Developments in Global Health Technologies.

Read more about this important topic in the latest feature article in the SLAS Electronic Laboratory Neighborhood e-zine.
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Get on the List! SLAS2015 Registration Opens in August
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SLAS2015 registration information is available now, including announcement of the Oct. 31 early bird deadline to benefit from significant discounts.

Review the details for industry, academic/government, student and exhibition-only registration categories, and sign up to receive notification when the site will begin to accept online registrations.

Be sure to explore the SLAS2015 Short Course Program including seven new or revamped courses based on previous participant input. SLAS2015 will be held Feb. 7-11 in Washington, DC.
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Call for Abstracts: JALA Special Issue on New Developments in Biosensing Technologies
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JALA Guest Editor Xianting Ding, Ph.D., of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China, invites manuscript proposals by Aug. 1.

This issue will present novel technologies and systems for the advancement of biosensing in all perspectives of biosystems from cancers, infectious diseases, aging diseases and chronics to surgery requested scenarios.

SLAS members and nonmembers alike are welcome to submit proposals.
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Directing Evolution: Laurie Garrett at TEDxDanubia 2014
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The SLAS2015 keynote speaker talked about her hero, Charles Darwin, May 15 in Budapest at TEDxDanubia 2014, which explored how the merging biological and technological revolution is transforming reality.

"Everybody is now saying, why wait for the miracles to happen?" says Garrett. "We're going to go in and direct life — make it produce what we want it to make and wow, this [synthetic biology] is a revolution for the industries."
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    Scientists Use 3-D Printing to Make Artificial Blood Vessels
    Phys.org    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    The tangled highway of blood vessels that twists and turns inside our bodies, delivering essential nutrients and disposing of hazardous waste to keep our organs working properly has been a conundrum for scientists trying to make artificial vessels from scratch. Now a team from Brigham and Women's Hospital has made headway in fabricating blood vessels using a three-dimensional bioprinting technique. More

    Starting Salaries for 2013 Graduates
    Chemical & Engineering News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Students who completed their studies and tried to enter the workforce in 2013 experienced a very high unemployment rate of 14.9 percent — up from 12.6 percent in 2012, and more than four times the 3.5 percent unemployment rate experienced by all ACS-member chemists in March 2013. The jump in unemployment is primarily driven by a large number of bachelor's degree earners who were unable to find jobs. At the same time, the percentage of newly minted graduates who found full-time positions was up nearly three points from the prior year to 29.0 percent. More

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    Light Coaxes Stem Cells to Repair Teeth
    Science Daily    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    A Harvard-led team is the first to demonstrate the ability to use low-power light to trigger stem cells inside the body to regenerate tissue, an advance they reported in Science Translational Medicine. The research, led by Wyss Institute Core Faculty member David Mooney, Ph.D., lays the foundation for a host of clinical applications in restorative dentistry and regenerative medicine more broadly, such as wound healing, bone regeneration, and more. The team used a low-power laser to trigger human dental stem cells to form dentin, the hard tissue that is similar to bone and makes up the bulk of teeth. More

    Stem Cells Make In-Lab Step Toward Specialization
    Bioscience Technology    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    The gap between stem cell research and regenerative medicine just became a lot narrower, thanks to a new technique that coaxes stem cells, with potential to become any tissue type, to take the first step to specialization. It is the first time this critical step has been demonstrated in a laboratory. University of Illinois researchers, in collaboration with scientists at Notre Dame University and the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China, published their results in the journal Nature Communications. More


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    Enzyme-Responsive Amphiphilic PEG-Dendron Hybrids and Their Assembly into Smart Micellar Nanocarriers
    Journal of the American Chemical Society    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Enzyme-responsive micelles have great potential as drug delivery platforms due to the high selectivity of the activating enzymes. Here we report a highly modular design for the efficient and simple synthesis of amphiphilic block copolymers based on a linear hydrophilic polyethyleneglycol and an enzyme-responsive hydrophobic dendron. These amphiphilic hybrids self-assemble in water into micellar nanocontainers that can disassemble and release encapsulated molecular cargo upon enzymatic activation. More

    Brain Tweak Could Let You Pop a Pill to Stop Seizures
    New Scientist    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    There is a new way to hack the brain. A technique that involves genetically engineering brain cells so that they fire in the presence of certain drugs has been used to treat an epilepsy-like condition in rats, and it could soon be trialed in humans. Chemogenetics builds on optogenetics, which involves engineering brain cells so they "fire" when lights are turned on. Selected neurons can then be activated with the flick of a switch. More



    Perceptions of Prescription Drug Prices
    By Mike Wokasch    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Remember a couple years ago when buses of elderly patients were going to Canada to get their prescriptions filled for lower prices than at their U.S. pharmacies? While an influx of inexpensive common generic drugs and support from Medicare Part D have quieted the masses — especially among the elderly — prescription drug prices remain a hot topic of debate thanks to expensive specialty medicines, some of which have prices approaching or even exceeding $100,000. I found some interesting information about prescription drug costs and uses in an excellent report from IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics. More

    Label-Free in Situ Monitoring of Histone Deacetylase Drug Target Engagement by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Mass Spectrometry Biotyping and Imaging
    Analytical Chemistry    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Measurements of target activation in cells or tissues are key indicators of efficacy during drug development. In contrast to established methods that require reagents and multiple preprocessing steps, reagent-free in situ analysis of engaged drug targets or target-proximal pharmacodynamic signatures in solid tumors remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that label-free quantification of histone acetylation-specific mass shifts by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry biotyping can be used for measurement of cellular potency of histone deacetylase inhibitors in intact cells. More

    New Method Discovered to Protect Against Chemical Weapons
    Phys.org    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered that some compounds called polyoxoniobates can degrade and decontaminate nerve agents such as the deadly sarin gas, and have other characteristics that may make them ideal for protective suits, masks or other clothing. The use of polyoxoniobates for this purpose had never before been demonstrated, scientists said, and the discovery could have important implications for both military and civilian protection. More


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    Career


    Associate Director Separation & Structural Sciences
    AstraZeneca
    UK - Cambridge

    Field Applications Scientist
    Cisbio Bioassays
    US – CA – San Diego

    Scientific Consultant
    Cisbio US, Inc.
    US – MA – Boston



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