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Better pain relief after knee replacement surgery?
HealthDay News via WebMD
Postoperative pain is always a concern after knee replacement surgery, but a new study suggests a strategy that might give patients another way to ease discomfort. Researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit note that the painful recovery process following knee replacement surgery is a persistent problem. However, the research team found that injecting a newer, long-acting numbing medicine, known as liposomal bupivacaine, into the area surrounding the knee helps patients recover more quickly and boosts their satisfaction with the procedure.
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The past and future office of the Surgeon General
Annals of Internal Medicine
Some argue that changes in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Public Health Service have diminished the power of the U.S. Surgeon General over the years. In this commentary, former Surgeon General David Satcher contends that the Office of the Surgeon General has actually gained credibility and influence with the American people as the reporting structure has evolved.
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Elective surgeries surge during holidays
USA Today
Orthopedic surgeon Jeffrey Stimac worked part of Thanksgiving and Christmas and expects to work part of New Year's Day checking on patients in the hospital after their operations. 'Tis the season for elective surgeries. "November and December are definitely my busiest months," says Stimac, who works for KentuckyOne Health in Louisville and does a lot of joint- and knee-replacement surgeries.
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Prevention of emergency surgery saves lives, money
HealthDay News via MPR
Strategies to reduce the number of emergency surgeries in the United States could save up to $1 billion in healthcare costs over a decade, according to a new study published online Dec. 17 in the Annals of Surgery. The researchers looked at three common operations for the study: aortic aneurysm repair, coronary artery bypass graft, and colon resection. Data for 621,925 patients, all having one of these procedures between 2001–2010, were analyzed. The researchers compared the hospital costs and mortality risk when surgeries were planned versus when they were performed in an emergency.
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Salpingectomy may prevent ovarian cancer, ACOG says
Medscape (free login required)
Removal of the fallopian tubes may help prevent ovarian cancer, according to an opinion written by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee on Gynecologic Practice. The opinion appears in the January 2015 issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology. "Salpingectomy at the time of hysterectomy or as a means of tubal sterilization appears to be safe, without an increase in complications ... compared with hysterectomy alone or tubal ligation," the committee writes.
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New imaging technology to detect cancer during surgery moves a step closer to market
News-Medical
New imaging technology that for the first time enables surgeons to detect cancer in real time during operations has moved a step closer to market thanks to a $3.1 million funding round by U.K. medical device company Lightpoint Medical. The molecular imaging technology, currently in clinical trials at Guy’s Hospital, London, aims to tackle the high rate of repeat operations undergone by people with some cancers, most notably breast and prostate cancer.
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Taking a closer look at the roles and responsibilities of orthopedic surgical group managers
Healthcare Professionals Network
In many ways, the science of medicine is the easy part — it’s the business aspect that baffles many physicians. Orthopedic surgical practices are complicated, organism-like affairs. The average practice employs 5 surgeons and an additional 30 support personnel. In addition to the complexities of multiple (and often strong) surgeon personalities working with each other and with local hospitals to meet the practice’s mission, the practice needs to interface with regulators, insurers, and of course, patients.
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Lack of sleep, parents' anxiety may affect kids' pain after surgery
Reuters
Children who didn’t sleep well leading up to a scheduled surgery, or whose parents made a big deal of the pain the child would feel, did turn out to have worse pain after surgery, according to a new U.S. study. The authors say theirs is the first study to look at both parents’ and childrens’ psychological factors before and after surgery that may influence pain, and it may lead to interventions that help kids who are prone to post-surgical pain.
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Most specialists reported at least one inappropriate referral per year
Healio
Inappropriate referrals to specialists occur frequently, and 75 percent of specialists reported at least one “completely inappropriate” referral in the past year, according to a survey conducted by Kryuus. The Boston-based health care solutions company conducted a 15-minute online survey in February that included 100 specialists across 11 specialties. They included cardiology (n=11), orthopedic surgery (n=10), gastroenterology (n=10), dermatology (n=10), ophthalmology (n=9), colorectal surgery (n=7), vascular surgery (n=5) and others. Participants were asked about referral methods and their assessment of the suitability of their referrals.
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A close look at blinking after facial transplantation
Medical Xpress
Recovery of blinking function is a critical but easily overlooked outcome after facial transplantation, according to a report in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). In their study, ASPS member surgeon Eduardo DeJesus Rodriguez, M.D., DDS, and colleagues highlight the need for careful surgical planning and technique to achieve optimal voluntary and reflex blinking — essential to protect long-term visual outcomes — in facial transplant recipients.
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