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Researchers find knee surgeries unnecessary
Counsel&Heal
Researchers found that repairing meniscal cartilage in the knee is not effective anymore than a placebo. They suspected that about 500,000 U.S. surgeries might be proved useless. Researchers believe that the most common diagnosis of the knee that requires treatment is a tear in the meniscus.
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Surgeon-led mortality review can improve patient outcomes
FierceHealthcare
Surgeon-led mortality reviews resulted in improved observed-to-expected ratios and University HealthSystem Consortium postsurgical relative rankings, according to a study. Researchers from the Department of Surgery at the University of Alabama examined data from December 2012 through August 2013 after surgeons from 12 services documented and reviewed mortality rates, patient safety indicators and hospital acquired conditions from 11,899 patients, according to the study abstract.
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New MRI technique illuminates wrist in motion
Science Daily
UC Davis radiologists, medical physicists and orthopaedic surgeons have found a way to create "movies" of the wrist in motion using a series of brief magnetic resonance imaging scans. Called "Active MRI," the technique could be useful in diagnosing subtle changes in physiology that indicate the onset of conditions such as wrist instability.
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Minimally invasive spinal procedures can speed healing times
The Daily Progress
Traditionally performed utilizing major incisions, some common spine procedures now may be done with a minimally invasive approach. The primary goal of most spine surgeries is to relieve pressure on the spinal cord or spinal nerves and/or to stabilize areas of spinal instability. With modern techniques and advanced instrumentation, highly trained surgeons can achieve the same results as open surgery while minimizing trauma to surrounding tissue.
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10 biggest stories for spine surgeons in 2013
Becker's Spine Review
This past year brought many changes for the spine field and healthcare in general. Becker's Spine Review provided a list of the 10 biggest stories for spine surgeons in 2013.

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New technology sheds light on medical procedures
The Herald Bulletin
The dark ages of drawing blood and starting IVs, where veins are missed and needle pricks are repeated, may be a thing of the past. Nowadays, medical professionals can see veins below the skin surface with ease. And they can determine the size and depth with a VeinViewer. Community Hospital Anderson has been providing this illuminating technology to patients since October.

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Surgeons describe new knee ligament
Medical News Today
At the Belgian University Hospitals Leuven, two knee surgeons have for the first time given a full anatomical description of a new ligament that they term the anterolateral ligament (ALL). The new ligament is thought to play an important role in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears.

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Early motion shows results comparable to immobilization after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair
Healio
In a 30-month follow-up of young patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, researchers found no significant differences in shoulder function between those who had early passive range of motion and patients who were immobilized. “There is no apparent advantage or disadvantage of early passive range of motion compared with immobilization with regard to healing or functional outcome,” Jay D. Keener, M.D., and colleagues from Washington University wrote in their abstract.
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Surgeons develop iPad app to capture trauma patient data in low medical resource environment
News-Medical
Electronic health records have become standard practice throughout hospitals in North America, but in countries with fewer resources many front-line clinicians are still collecting data on paper, if they are collecting it at all. But now, surgeons from Vancouver, British Columbia, have developed a way for their peers at a Level I trauma center in South Africa to accurately collect and analyze trauma care data via an iPad app.
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Labia surgeries may be driven by unnatural images
Reuters
Women who were initially exposed to images of surgically modified female genitalia were more likely to consider them 'normal' and 'ideal' when later comparing them to unaltered genitalia, Australian researchers report. Labiaplasty is an increasingly popular cosmetic surgery to reduce the size of a woman's labia minora and make them more symmetrical so they don't protrude beyond the labia majora.
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Heart surgeons find they can rely on less blood stock
Medical News Today
Heart surgeons who performed aortic valve replacement operations for over 750 patients have found from analyzing data on complications that strategies to reduce the need for donor blood stocks are safe and improve outcomes. They analyzed patient morbidity, mortality and blood product utilization, and found positive results.
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Active lifestyles increase knee replacement surgeries in younger adults
Drug Watch
The number of total knee replacement surgeries doubled in the U.S during the last decade, a recent study shows. A 2013 report published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery showed that more Americans are getting knee replacements at younger ages, which could put them at risk for future complications that could require subsequent replacement surgeries.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Medicare identifies best and worst hospitals for hip and knee replacements (NBCNews)
A 3-year-old boy receives 5 major organ transplants (The New York Daily News)
Can a 'frailty score' predict surgical outcomes? (Medscape (free subscription))
Surgeons describe new knee ligament (Medical News Today)
Reducing post-op pain in kids after high-risk surgery (Science 2.0)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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