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App's map of the human body also charts next generation of surgical training
New York Daily News
Thanks to 3-D mapping technology you can peek at Central Park, walk the Great Wall of China or even zoom in on the Big Dipper without leaving your sofa. Now a new map lets you explore locations much, much closer to home — like your bones, muscles, brain and heart.
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Bio-inspired adhesive may help surgeons treat congenital heart defects, other heart problems
News-Medical
When a child is born with a heart defect such as a hole in the heart, the highly invasive therapies are challenging due to an inability to quickly and safely secure devices inside the heart. Sutures take too much time to stitch and can cause stress on fragile heart tissue, and currently available clinical adhesives are either too toxic or tend to lose their sticking power in the presence of blood or under dynamic conditions, such as in a beating heart.
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Floating organ holograms dazzle surgeons
SLATE
The technology gives surgeons a unique look into a patient's anatomy.

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Improving training in minimally invasive Ob/Gyn surgeries
Medscape (free subscription)
Looking over the horizon to 2014 and beyond, an issue that looms for those who perform gynecologic surgery involves what may appear to be conflicting goals: assuring quality of gynecologic surgical services while maintaining and improving access. A recent editorial and article in the ACOG (American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) "Green Journal" highlighted a number of factors that affect quality and access.

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10 biggest stories for spine surgeons in 2013
Becker's Spine Review
This past year brought many changes for the spine field and healthcare in general. Becker's Spine Review provided a list of the 10 biggest stories for spine surgeons in 2013.

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New technology sheds light on medical procedures
The Herald Bulletin
The dark ages of drawing blood and starting IVs, where veins are missed and needle pricks are repeated, may be a thing of the past. Nowadays, medical professionals can see veins below the skin surface with ease. And they can determine the size and depth with a VeinViewer. Community Hospital Anderson has been providing this illuminating technology to patients since October.

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Study: Shorter hospital stay, fewer complications for robotic-assisted prostate surgery versus open surgery
The Wall Street Journal
New findings from a large, population-based study show that robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (removal of the prostate and surrounding tissue) results in a shorter average hospital stay and lower overall complication rate compared to open surgery. Even in surgeons' initial robotic-assisted prostatectomy cases, robotic-assisted prostatectomies resulted in fewer complications and shorter hospital stays than open surgery. Researchers further documented that key proficiency measures, such as surgery time, complication rates and length of hospital stay, continued to improve as a surgeon's robotic-assisted case volume increased. Mean operating time remained longer for the robotic-assisted group.
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Preperitoneal mesh placement a valid option for ventral hernia repair
2 minute medicine
Authors analyzed preperitoneal ventral hernia repair outcomes of complex patients with multiple comorbidities and prior abdominal surgeries. Their preperitoneal mesh placement technique allowed tremendous overlap between the mesh and tissues surrounding the hernia, allowing for mesh-to-defect ratios of 4:1 and reaching as far as the psoas muscles bilaterally.
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Study: Children's ear tube surgery might be unnecessary in the long-term
WUNC-AM
Researchers at the University of North Carolina and RTI International have found that children who have tubes implanted in their ears to remove fluid pressure fare just as well in the long run as kids who wait out the symptoms under a doctor's care. The small tubes are surgically implanted in a child’s eardrums to relieve the condition, called otitis media with effusion.
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Pediatric surgeons get a lesson from experts in Mumbai
dna India
It was study time for paediatric surgeons in Mumbai as the pioneers of genital abnormality surgeries — Dr Alberto Peña and Dr Andrea Bischoff — conducted a live operative workshop on paediatric colorectal surgeries at KEM Hospital in Parel which concluded on Saturday. Dr Peña is presently the founding director of the Colorectal Centre for Children at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Centre, Cincinnati in Ohio, USA.
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Less invasive hip surgery has patients back on their feet faster
Herald-Review
Linda Harrison’s left hip had been hurting for several years. She had some injections and visited a few doctors before finally in January 2013 one told her the cartilage was wearing away and she needed a hip replacement. But Harrison wasn’t ready for surgery. That was until she saw a seminar in Decatur by Springfield orthopedic surgeon Dr. Jacob D. Sams.
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Surgeons use 3-D printers, seaweed to repair damaged bones
Special Broadcasting Service
It's hoped the hand held 'Bio Pen' will help improve precision during surgery and speed up recovery times for patients. The handheld device is designed to help surgeons draw human tissue onto damaged bones. Researchers say it represents a big innovation in orthopaedic surgery. It works like a 3-D printer, building up layers of the patient's own stem cells to create a 'living implant' constructed during surgery.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Researchers find knee surgeries unnecessary (Counsel&Heal)
Labia surgeries may be driven by unnatural images (Reuters)
New MRI technique illuminates wrist in motion (Science Daily)
Surgeons develop iPad app to capture trauma patient data in low medical resource environment (News-Medical)
Active lifestyles increase knee replacement surgeries in younger adults (Drug Watch)

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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