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E-learning matches traditional training for doctors, nurses
Reuters
Millions more students worldwide could train as doctors and nurses using electronic learning, which is just as effective as traditional medical training, a review commissioned by the World Health Organization has found. Researchers at Imperial College London who conducted the review said that wider use of e-learning might help make up for a global shortfall of 7.2 million health workers identified in a recent WHO report.
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Study: Quicker surgery is better
By Jonathan Kaplan, MD
In a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers found that longer surgery duration is associated with increased risk of blood clots forming in the leg and leading to a pulmonary embolism. What does this mean? Doctors found one factor that can lead to an increased risk of forming blood clots that travel to the heart and lungs is prolonged times in the operating room. You might think that if you have a surgical procedure, it's best if the surgeon is slow and methodical to avoid mistakes. Unfortunately, that is not the case.
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3-D printer helps doctors prep for complex surgeries
The Boston Globe
Dr. Joseph Madsen entered the operating room at Boston Children’s Hospital on New Year’s Eve and stood over Myalynn Ranson, a teenager with plans to become a marine biologist and travel the world — if only her violent seizures would stop. Madsen’s challenge was to remove a chunk of abnormal tissue from the left side of Myalynn’s brain, the likely culprit in the seizures, without damaging her memory or slicing a blood vessel.
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Telehealth hits the mark on Triple Aim requirements
By Karen R. Thomas
In today's rapidly-evolving healthcare environment, care providers are looking for new ways to meet the needs of those for whom they provide care, while simultaneously reducing overall care costs. Hence, the development of Triple Aim. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) developed the Triple Aim as an approach for the healthcare system to use new innovations to simultaneously improve three things: the patient care experience, the health of all populations and the per capita cost of healthcare.
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New, smarter meds help doctors move away from unneeded surgeries for colorectal cancer
Healthline News
The changing treatments offered to patients with stage 4 colorectal cancer — the third most common type of cancer in the United States — paint a picture of how advances in cancer medicine affect patients with deadly cancers. People with stage 4 colorectal cancer have a primary tumor in their colon or rectum as well as metastatic cancer growths elsewhere, most often on the liver. Previously, the standard treatment was to remove the primary tumor before administering chemotherapy.
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Eye surgeon uses stem cells to repair damaged corneas
Medical Xpress
In Hyderabad, India, Sayan Basu is using stem cells in a pilot project to restore the eyesight of patients with damaged corneas. If proven successful, the procedure could mean that Indian citizens can avoid long waiting lists for cornea transplants and avoid eye surgery altogether. But perhaps even more notable, Basu, an eye surgeon, is using a stem-cell procedure first described only last month in the journal Science Translational Medicine, based on research he helped complete at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. It is rare for research on mice is quickly applied to treat people.
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Should surgeons report blood-borne illnesses?
The Star Phoenix
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan will start grappling with an issue requiring a balance of privacy and patient safety: should doctors have to disclose a blood-borne illness such as HIV or hepatitis C?
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Researchers propose new regulations for off-label uses of drugs and devices
Medical Xpress
Off-label use of drugs and medical devices has long been a part of medicine. The practice provides public health benefits but also presents some risks. To address that issue, researchers from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have proposed a system combining reporting, testing and enforcement regulations, and allowing interim periods of off-label drug prescription. Their recommendations, published in the Duke Law Journal, would give patients more treatment options while providing regulators with evidence of the drugs' safety and efficacy.
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Flex-IT Act reintroduced to shorten meaningful use, again
By Scott E. Rupp
The Flexibility in Health IT Reporting (Flex-IT) Act of 2015, a reiteration of a bill introduced in Congress in 2014, has been introduced by Rep. Renee Ellmers (R-N.C.) and Rep. Ron Kind (D-Wis.). According to the statement released by the members of Congress who drafted the bill, H.R. 270 would ensure that healthcare providers receive the flexibility "they need to successfully comply with HHS's meaningful use program."
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Post-traumatic rhinoplasty requires a structural, anatomical mindset
Healio
Performing rhinoplasty to correct the results of a traumatic injury to the nose is more than just a cosmetic procedure, requiring the surgeon to take a different approach to the surgery, according to a speaker. During the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery Annual Scientific Meeting, Amit B. Patel, M.D., said he prefers to address the trauma from a structural and anatomical mindset rather than a cosmetic one, determining how many architectural “insults” are present and the degree of damage to be repaired.
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