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A handheld 3-D printer lets surgeons draw new cells
Fast Company
A handheld surgical "pen" that works a little like a mini-3-D printer may soon be used to help repair damaged bones. Surgeons could use the BioPen, developed by Australian researchers, to draw layers of stem cells directly at the site of an injury. After filling the damaged bone with the cells — mixed with a biodegradable seaweed extract to hold everything together — an ultraviolet light on the pen sets the gel in place.
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Womb transplants raise ethical concerns
USA Today
Nine women in Sweden have successfully received transplanted wombs donated from relatives in an experimental procedure that has raised some ethical concerns. The women will soon try to become pregnant with their new wombs, the doctor in charge of the pioneering project has revealed.
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Surgeon takes pains to preserve tattoos when he fixes spines
Chicago Sun-Times
Occasionally mixed among the family photos on Dr. Tyler Koski’s cellphone are pictures of back tattoos. Koski, a surgeon, takes pains to preserve patients’ tattoos when he fixes their spines. He’ll slice the inked skin, spend hours tinkering with a spine, and then study the picture the way someone working on a jigsaw puzzle looks at the box.
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Patient kept awake during brain surgery
WMAQ-TV
Many patients are put to sleep for something as complex as brain surgery, but not Josh Wickey. Doctors used only topical anesthesia for the 35-year-old's recent surgery, keeping him fully awake for the six hour procedure so that he could communicate with Northwestern Medicine neurosurgeon Matthew Tate.
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CMS decision allows CED for percutaneous image guided lumbar decompression
Healio
A recent decision by CMS permits Coverage with Evidence Development status for percutaneous image guided lumbar decompression in the treatment of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis who are enrolled in such studies. “We are very pleased with the decision of CMS to allow [Coverage with Evidence Development] CED for this very promising technology,” Earl R. Fender stated.

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Improving training in minimally invasive Ob/Gyn surgeries
Medscape (free subscription)
Looking over the horizon to 2014 and beyond, an issue that looms for those who perform gynecologic surgery involves what may appear to be conflicting goals: assuring quality of gynecologic surgical services while maintaining and improving access. A recent editorial and article in the ACOG (American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) "Green Journal" highlighted a number of factors that affect quality and access.

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10 biggest stories for spine surgeons in 2013
Becker's Spine Review
This past year brought many changes for the spine field and healthcare in general. Becker's Spine Review provided a list of the 10 biggest stories for spine surgeons in 2013.

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Surgeon general report links more diseases, health problems to smoking tobacco
The Washington Post
Fifty years after the U.S. surgeon general first linked cigarette smoking to deadly diseases such as lung cancer and heart disease, his successors continue to add to the list of health problems associated with tobacco use. Smoking is a cause of liver cancer and colorectal cancer, the fourth-most-diagnosed form of the disease in the United States, Acting Surgeon General Boris D. Lushniak found in a report released.
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New treatment more effective at reducing blood clots in brain-injured patients
YottaFire
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found that a new protocol that uses preventive blood-thinning medication in the treatment of patients with traumatic brain injuries reduces the risk of patients developing life-threatening blood clots without increasing the risk of bleeding inside the brain. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries occur each year.
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Hip fractures increase with chronic intestinal damage in CD
Medscape (free subscription)
Chronic damage in the small intestine is a risk factor for hip fracture in patients with celiac disease (CD), according to a cohort study published online January 16 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. "[CD] is associated with an increased fracture risk, an increase that persists after diagnosis," write Benjamin Lebwohl, M.D.
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Diverticulitis surgery often avoidable, new standard needed
Medscape (free subscription)
Complicated recurrence of diverticulitis is rare even after 2 acute episodes, and chronic symptoms often remain after colectomy, according to a systematic review published online January 15 in JAMA Surgery. The findings suggest nonsurgical approaches should be the standard of care. "The prior standard for proceeding with elective colectomy following 2 episodes of diverticulitis is no longer accepted," Scott E. Regenbogen, M.D., MPH said.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    App's map of the human body also charts next generation of surgical training (New York Daily News)
Pediatric surgeons get a lesson from experts in Mumbai (dna India)
Bio-inspired adhesive may help surgeons treat congenital heart defects, other heart problems (News-Medical)
Floating organ holograms dazzle surgeons (SLATE)
Less invasive hip surgery has patients back on their feet faster (Herald-Review)

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