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Potentially fatal complication found in heart valve put in children
Forbes
Pediatric cardiac surgeons at Boston Children’s Hospital are warning the medical community about a potentially fatal problem in children and young adults who received a bioprosthetic valve manufactured by Sorin. The surgeons initially became concerned when a young asymptomatic patient died suddenly after her valve underwent rapid calcification, only 7 months after a routine followup echocardiogram found no signs of blockage.
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Why the US hasn't approved balloons for weight loss
Medical Daily
For people who are considered overweight or obese, with a body mass index (BMI) of 27 or above, and who wish to lose their weight, a new type of treatment is being offered in the U.K. It’s called the Obalon balloon, and it’s essentially a balloon that sits in the stomach with the purpose of reducing appetite by taking up space. Although, trials in the UK showed some success, it might be a long time before the U.S. sees this type of treatment, even as the gastric balloons also gain popularity in other parts of the world.
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Endoscopic techniques enhance vitreoretinal surgeon's view
Healio
Endoscopic vitrectomy may be the next generation in vitreoretinal surgery, according to a speaker here. “To my thinking, in many ways, the vitreoretinal surgery playing field is flat. …The tools and hardware that we have are evenly distributed, and we can get great care all across the country. Our next levels of improvement for vitreoretinal surgery certainly involve drugs,” Allen C. Ho, M.D., of Wills Eye Institute, said at Retina 2014. “But also more simply involve viewing.”
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New 'Icy' technique improves robotic kidney transplants
The Economic Times
Surgeons in India and U.S. have successfully transplanted kidneys into 50 patients using an innovative robot-assisted procedure. A collaboration of surgeons at Medanta Hospital in India and Michigan-based Henry Ford Hospital, conducted the procedure in which the organ is cooled with sterile ice during the operation.
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Can big data and mobile make healthcare more effective?
Forbes
Mobile and big data are good medicine for health care. Providers are leveraging big data to more effectively inform decisions while taking advantage of the immediacy and convenience that mobile device technology has to offer. For example, aetnahealth’s Epocrates Bugs + Drugs, which was downloaded 100,000 times in its first month of release, puts critical information about bacteria types and resistance patterns in communities throughout the United States into clinicians’ hands.

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CMS decision allows CED for percutaneous image guided lumbar decompression
Healio
A recent decision by CMS permits Coverage with Evidence Development status for percutaneous image guided lumbar decompression in the treatment of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis who are enrolled in such studies. “We are very pleased with the decision of CMS to allow [Coverage with Evidence Development] CED for this very promising technology,” Earl R. Fender stated.

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Improving training in minimally invasive Ob/Gyn surgeries
Medscape (free subscription)
Looking over the horizon to 2014 and beyond, an issue that looms for those who perform gynecologic surgery involves what may appear to be conflicting goals: assuring quality of gynecologic surgical services while maintaining and improving access. A recent editorial and article in the ACOG (American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) "Green Journal" highlighted a number of factors that affect quality and access.

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New York doctors' 3-D-printed windpipe may one day let patients breathe easier
New York Daily News
Dr. Faiz Bhora of St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospitals and his research team hope to be the first in the world to successfully implant 3-D-printed tracheas in people. The tracheas are printed from biologic materials on a 3-D printer and primed with stem cells for growth.
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Surgeons develop strategy to save lives after mass casualty events
General Surgery News
What Dr. Jacobs saw the morning of the Sandy Hook tragedy has spurred a large-scale initiative that, organizers hope, will change the way surgeons, health care workers, law enforcement officers, first responders and even ordinary citizens work together to save lives in future shootings and mass casualty events. In the aftermath of previous gun rampages like those in Aurora or Columbine, both in Colorado, much of the national conversation focused on how to prevent future tragedies. That hasn’t stopped these tragedies from happening. “They’re now a reality of modern American life,” Dr. Jacobs said.
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Minimally invasive robotic surgery: A safe alternative to traditional open surgery
News-Medical
A collaboration of surgeons at Henry Ford Hospital and Medanta Hospital in India successfully transplanted kidneys into 50 recipients using an innovative robot-assisted procedure in which the organ is cooled with sterile ice during the operation. "Minimally invasive surgery reduces post-operative pain and minimizes complications in comparison to conventional surgery," says Dr. Mani Menon.
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Aggressive management of gunshot wounds to brain significantly increases survival
Medical Xpress
About nine out of 10 people with gunshot wounds to the brain will die. University of Arizona trauma surgeons, using a new aggressive resuscitation protocol for patients with gunshot head injuries, have increased survival to nearly five out of 10 victims, according to a recent study published by in The American Journal of Surgery. Gunshot wounds to the brain are the most lethal of firearm injuries, with survival rates of 10 percent to 15 percent. Because of the high mortality rate, aggressive management often is not given to the most severely injured patients, said Dr. Bellal Joseph, UA assistant professor of surgery and the study's lead author.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Diverticulitis surgery often avoidable, new standard needed (Medscape (free subscription))
Surgeon takes pains to preserve tattoos when he fixes spines (Chicago Sun-Times)
Womb transplants raise ethical concerns (USA Today)
Patient kept awake during brain surgery (WMAQ-TV)
A handheld 3-D printer lets surgeons draw new cells (Fast Company)

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