This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit May. 1, 2012

Home   About   Membership   Education & Resources   Publications   Contact Us

 

1 kidney, three bodies: After failed transplant, kidney gives new life
ABC News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
VideoBriefIn a medical first, a transplanted kidney rejected by one patient was successfully transplanted into another patient, according to doctors at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. This procedure challenges the idea that surgeons can only attempt to transplant an organ once, said Dr. Lorenzo Gollan, a transplant nephrologist and medical director of the kidney transplant program at the hospital. His findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. More



 AASPA News


Start planning now for the 12th Annual AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
AASPA    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article

We hope you will join us at the Hilton Suites Chicago/Magnificent Mile in Chicago for our 12th Annual AASPA CME Meeting in 2012, Sept. 27-30.

Join fellow Surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, Pre-PA Students and surgical industry leaders at the 12th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

If you are looking for a qualified Surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with Surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

For more information, including on how to sponsor or exhibit at the meeting, go to www.aaspa.com.


Fundamental Critical Care Support course
AASPA    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article

For 2012 the Society of Critical Care's Fundamental Critical Care Support Course. According to the SCC, this course is a two-day comprehensive course addressing fundamental management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. It will prepare you for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged. It is also designed to assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient and to prepare nurses and other critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.

Course Purpose
• To better prepare the non-intensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged
• To assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient
• To prepare house staff for ICU coverage
•To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.

Course Objectives
• Prioritize assessment needs for the critically ill patient
• Select appropriate diagnostic tests
• Identify and respond to significant changes in the unstable patient
• Recognize and initiate management of acute life-threatening conditions
• Determine the need for expert consultation and/or patient transfer and prepare the practitioner for optimally accomplishing transfer

For more information and to register, go to our website.


Physician assistants wanted for volunteer opportunity in Nigeria
Hospitals for Humanity    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Hospitals For Humanity is a registered non-profit organization with 501(c) 3 status in the United States. They provide health care for people living in the least developed countries of the world. HFH is looking for compassionate physicians and physician assistants to volunteer for our medical missions. If you are interested in learning more please go to www.hospitalsforhumanity.org or send an email to Ajohnson@hospitalsforhumanity.org.

Currently two Medical Mission Initiatives remain for this year: Okija, Anambra State in Nigeria from Oct. 12-19 and Ijumu Land, Kogi State in Nigeria from Dec. 1-12.




 More News


Heart surgery safe for compensated cirrhosis patients
HealthDay News via Physicians Briefing    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Patients with compensated cirrhosis have no significant increase in postoperative mortality and morbidity following cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, according to a study published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. More

Robotic surgery dominant in prostate cancer
MedPage Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Fueled in part by fewer complications, robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy has surpassed open surgery as the predominant surgical approach to localized prostate cancer, analysis of a national database showed. More

Surgery shows promise in lung metastases
MedPage Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Resection of lung metastases led to recurrence-free survival for a majority of patients during a median-follow-up of more than two years, a retrospective study showed. More

Outpatient surgery patients also at risk for blood clots
MedicalXpress    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A University of Michigan Health System study examined who's having outpatient surgery in the U.S. today and showed 1 in 84 highest-risk patients suffers a dangerous blood clot after surgery. More

Surgical robots worth the investment?
Hospitals & Health Networks    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Hospitals consider many factors in deciding whether to offer robotic surgery — patient benefit, hospital competition and hospital costs. The trend toward robotic surgery also brings up such issues as overall health care spending, the comparative effectiveness of treatment options and the pace of technology adoption. More

Surgeons slip on performance-enhancing shirts
The Orange County Register    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
In their battle against operating-room fatigue and chronic back and neck problems, a growing number of Orange County, California, surgeons are turning to something that long has been the bane of athletes and fitness enthusiasts, though not — until recently — doctors: Performance apparel. More

The confusion of hospital pricing
The New York Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Hospital charges are all over the map: according to the report published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, fees for a routine appendectomy in California can range from $1,500 to — in one extreme case — $182,955. Researchers found wide variations in charges even among appendectomy patients treated at the same hospital. More

Arthrex wants to build a surgery center
Outpatient Surgery Magazine    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Reinhold Schmieding, founder and president of orthopedic device manufacturer Arthrex, Inc., has unveiled a plan that he hopes will make the company's Florida home a magnet for orthopedic surgeons and patients from around the world. More

Simulator hits new medical training high
MedPage Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
VideoBriefA new $38-million education and simulation training center at the University of South Florida in Tampa is "the teaching center of the future," says Dr. Leslie W. Miller, the university's cardiology chair. "The goal is to improve patient safety and outcomes by emphasizing evidenced-based medicine, team-building and patient communication." More


 
AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Domini Davis, Content Editor, 469.420.2661   
Contribute news

This edition of AASPA Newsline was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
May 1, 2012
April 13, 2012
April 5, 2012



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063