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AASPA NEWS

2015 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 1 – 4, 2015 at the Hilton Suites Chicago/Magnificent Mile, Chicago, Illinois, for our 15th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 15th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Suites Chicago in the heart of incredible Chicago.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Register now for the 2015 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.
    Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 15th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Suites Chicago/Magnificent Mile.

Register today!


INDUSTRY NEWS


Local anesthesia may be best for infants during surgery
HealthDay News
New research suggests infants may recover better after some kinds of surgery if they receive local anesthesia — which only numbs part of the body — instead of being "knocked out" completely with general anesthesia. Young patients who had local anesthesia were less likely to suffer from disrupted breathing following hernia surgery, the study found.
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Work-life balance in healthcare: The fundamentals
By Catherine Iste
People in careers that revolve around helping others are often the worst at maintaining a healthy work-life balance. Healthcare workers are some of the most challenged employees when it comes to self-care, yet they spend every day helping others with health challenges. It seems to be a common personality trait among those driven to help others that they put others first. Yet time and again we have all seen that if we take care of ourselves, we can actually help others more.
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Octopus-inspired robotic arms can multitask during surgery
Live Science
A robotic arm inspired by octopus tentacles could make it easier for surgeons to access hard-to-reach parts of the body. A new robotic device uses a series of inflatable chambers to mimic how an octopus can twist, elongate and bend its limbs in any direction. The mechanical arm also imitates the way an octopus can change the stiffness of different sections of its tentacles, allowing the cephalopods to interact with objects. The device could help make it easier for surgeons to reach parts of the body that are usually tough to access.
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Surgeons want robotics training during general surgery residency
General Surgery News
The vast majority of residents and attendings believe that robotics should be included in general surgery training and that it should start in the first year, according to the results of a single-center study presented at the 2015 Southeastern Surgical Congress Annual Meeting. Despite this finding, there is not yet enough literature to begin formulating how standardized robotics education should be achieved, said investigator Heather R. Nolan, M.D., a general surgery resident at Mercer University School of Medicine/The Medical Center-Navicent Health, in Macon, Georgia.
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Study: Orthopedic surgeons largely contribute to opioid epidemic
Forbes
Understanding why physicians from various areas of expertise prescribe opioids helps the medical community as a whole combat opioid abuse, misuse and overdose. Even though emergency physicians are not likely to prescribe opioids to discharged patients, doctors from other medical fields are contributing to the opioid epidemic at a higher rate.
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Tiny robot uses da Vinci Surgical System on grape, illustrates the future of medicine
Medical Daily
VideoBrief In a video released by da Vinci Surgery, a grape with a flesh wound gets sewn up by a pair of tiny clawed hands at the end of two robotic arms. While a surgeon is still off-screen, manipulating the arms and performing the surgery, eventually da Vinci and other scientists emulating the technology hope to make the machines go fully autonomous.
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Insomniacs may be more sensitive to pain
HealthDay News
People with insomnia or poor sleep quality may be less tolerant of pain, new research suggests. The more frequent and severe the insomnia, the greater the sensitivity to pain, the Norwegian study showed. Additionally, the researchers noted that people with insomnia who also suffer from chronic pain have an even lower threshold for physical discomfort.
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Smoking linked to worse outcomes after urologic cancer surgery and other major surgeries
Medical Xpress
Patients who smoke, as well as those who once had the habit, are more likely to develop complications during and after major urologic cancer surgery, according to a new study that included researchers at Henry Ford Health System. The multi-institutional study, being presented on Friday, May 15 at the 2015 annual meeting of the American Urological Association in New Orleans, also found that quitting smoking for even a year "significantly" improves surgical outcomes.
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Quality of medical records, informed consent and expert reports influential on judicial decisions
Healio
In cases where malpractice claims were brought against plastic surgeons, researchers found the factors most influential on judicial decisions were the quality of the patient medical records, whether written informed consent was obtained and the conclusions provided by the expert report. The researchers obtained data for 98 malpractice claims from a state court of justice in Brazil that were filed between 2000 and 2008, with 39 closed cases selected for analysis within the study.
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Scaphal reduction with traditional otoplasty can help correct macrotia deformities
Healio
The use of scaphal reduction, which can modify the upper auricle contour and decrease the overall ear size, can be a useful supplement to traditional otoplasty and may be indicated in a larger number of cases than previously expected, according to study findings. Researchers retrospectively reviewed data from 84 otoplasty procedures performed at a single center from 2010 to 2013. The researchers analyzed patient demographics, preoperative assessments, the surgical technique used, reported complications and any reported need for revision.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Researchers solve mystery of deadly transplant infection (Medical Xpress)
How to avoid health system staff turnover and employee poaching (By Scott E. Rupp)
ASBS: Less invasive mastectomy technique holds promise (MedPage Today)
Plastic surgeons find association between carpal tunnel syndrome and migraine headache (News-Medical)
FDA approves raplixa for controlling bleeding during surgery (Anesthesiology News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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