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Why healthcare is slow to go mobile
Fierce Healthcare
With the quick advancement of remote access technologies showing no end in sight, it's time for healthcare organizations to get on board the mobile technology train or risk getting run over, iHealthBeat reported. Yet privacy concerns over sharing and accessing sensitive data from remote locations has made healthcare slower than other industries in securing the paths used to access that data.
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AASPA NEWS


Register for the 2013 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
AASPA
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two day course - 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the non-intensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Old Town Alexandria. Register today!

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Download the AASPA app today!
AASPA
AASPA is pleased to announce the release of its new app, available in the iTunes store for both iPhone and iPad users. With this app, members and nonmembers can keep up to date with what's going on in AASPA. Use the app to find:
  • Event Schedules
  • Surveys
  • Medical Wall
  • Social Media
  • Newsletter
  • Medical QR Scanner
  • Breaking News
  • Medical Notepad
  • Many more features!
Nonmembers can find out what it takes to be a surgical physicians assistant and determine which field would suit them best. Members will enjoy the peace of mind of knowing exactly what is going on in the association at any given time. AASPA is proud to go mobile and encourages current and potential members to download this app for more information.

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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Orthopedic surgeons top the list of physician incomes (Health Point Capital)
Robotic surgery: Safe but costly (MedPage Today)
Surgeon-driven quality effort slashes complications, costs (HealthLeaders Media)
Healthcare blame game: What hospitals charge vs. what they get paid (By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan)
Study: Robotic surgery learned best using 3 teaching methods (MultiBriefs)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


UI Hospital offers robotic surgery for head and neck cancer
Health Canal
Two experts in the use of robot-assisted surgery to treat head and neck cancers have joined the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System department of otolaryngology – head & neck surgery. Wenig and Jefferson are experts in the use of a surgical approach called transoral robotic surgery, or TORS, to reach throat, tongue, tonsil and larynx tumors by going in through the mouth instead of through an incision in the neck.
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Mesothelioma surgeons report new biopsy technique
Surviving Melanoma
A team of surgeons in MD have demonstrated how using a standard biopsy tool in a new way could improve the biopsy process for certain mesothelioma patients. An aggressive cancer of the pleural lining around the lungs, malignant pleural mesothelioma usually requires a tissue biopsy to make a definitive diagnosis.
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The invisible hearing aid
KSAT-TV
Another option for people with hearing loss is the Envoy Esteem. It is the world’s first FDA-approved totally implantable hearing device. It is implanted under the skin behind the ear and in the middle ear space. It is completely invisible, which allows the Esteem to overcome limitations of hearing aids; including the discomfort of feeling something in the ear, infection, wax buildup, and acoustic feedback.
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MORE NEWS


2 healthcare reform regulations move forward
Fierce Health Payer
Despite the ongoing attempts of Republicans to repeal President Obama's health reform law and link it to the current scandal at the Internal Revenue Service, the administration is going ahead with two major Affordable Care Act regulations that provide insurance to people with pre-existing conditions and set maximum profit margins for certain providers.
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The 4 'hanging chads' of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
Becker's Hospital Review
The United States is more than three years into the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, but there are still a great deal of questions left unanswered. Next year, 2014, is where many of the unanswered answers reside, especially in regard to health insurance exchanges, bundled payment demonstrations, accountable care organization results and consolidation after effects.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Surgeon-driven quality effort slashes complications, costs
HealthLeaders Media
The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project, a growing effort run by the American College of Surgeons since 2004, reports that 83 percent of program participants have been able to decrease their surgical complication rates by a statistically significant level.

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CoxHealth combines operating room, 'cath lab' in new hybrid facility
KSMU
The human heart and the body's blood vessels work seamlessly to keep blood flowing. But when something goes wrong, like trauma to the aorta, doctors need to examine both, and sometimes, that needs to be done quickly. A new facility at CoxHealth is making it easier for experts to do that.

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Study: Robotic surgery learned best using 3 teaching methods
News-Medical.net
By developing a new way to compare techniques for teaching robotic surgery, doctors at The Methodist Hospital and the University of Southern California report that surgeons training in robotic surgery learned best when three different teaching methods were used.

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An exciting new laser eye surgery option
Hive Health Media
Bladeless LASIK is a new type of eye surgery that can correct common vision problems such as long and shortsightedness. Unlike traditional laser eye surgery, bladeless LASIK does not use a blade to cut through the cornea at the front of the eye. Instead, an extremely precise laser makes a small flap in the cornea, so the surgeon can work inside the eye.
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3-D printer shows surgeons secrets of strange hearts
New Scientist
Andy Coghlan states "We've had 3-D-printed aeroplanes, guns and fossil skulls – but these are the first copies of real human hearts. Constructed from plastic, they are exact anatomical replicas of the hearts of patients with unusual complications"
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Infectious disease specialists: Solving mysteries, tackling new challenges
Medscape Today
A relatively small medical discipline merely 30 years ago, infectious diseases (ID) has emerged as one of the most vital medical specialties. In the early 1980s, there were fewer than 1000 of us, and now there are nearly 7500 board-certified ID specialists and 10,000 members of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), including more than 900 members in training and 1500 international members.
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AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Content Editor, 469.420.2661   
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