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2014 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 23-26, 2014 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco, CA, for our 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 14th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Union Square in the heart of incredible San Francisco.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Click here to REGISTER NOW for best pricing!
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Register now for the 2014 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco.

Register today!
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MORE NEWS


A better imager for identifying tumors
Phys.Org
Before they excise a tumor, surgeons need to determine exactly where the cancerous cells lie. Now, research published today in The Optical Society's (OSA) journal Optics Letters details a new technique that could give surgeons cheaper and more lightweight tools, such as goggles or hand-held devices, to identify tumors in real time in the operating room. The new technology, developed by a team at the University of Arizona and Washington University in St. Louis, is a dual-mode imager that combines two systems — near-infrared fluorescent imaging to detect marked cancer cells and visible light reflectance imaging to see the contours of the tissue itself — into one small, lightweight package approximately the size of a quarter in diameter, just 25 millimeters across.
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Will robots render surgeons obsolete?
Bloomberg
New York University Langone Robotic Surgery Center’s Dr. Michael Stifelman discusses robotic surgery on Bloomberg Television’s “Bloomberg West.”

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Bone cement tied to rare severe hip surgery outcomes
Medscape (Free login required)
Bone cement use in hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur may be associated with rare instances of perioperative death or severe harm, according to an article published online June 12 in BMJ Open. Paul D. Rutter, Ph.D., from the Institute of Global Health Innovation, Imperial College London, United Kingdom, and colleagues analyzed data on cases of bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) reported to the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) between 2005 and 2012 for England and Wales.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Keratoprosthesis restores vision in patients blinded by corneal disease
News-Medical
A new review article in the June issue of Focal Points, a monthly publication of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, calls keratoprosthesis a viable alternative to standard corneal transplantation to help people suffering from corneal blindness.

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New brain implant conquers vertigo
Scientific American (subscription required)
Surgeons have implanted a new prosthesis in four patients to correct disabling dizziness. The device may someday restore balance to hundreds of thousands more.

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Hospitals avoid morcellator for hysterectomies after FDA warning
Tampa Bay Times
Most Tampa Bay hospitals have halted a surgical technique used in many hysterectomies after a warning from the federal government that the procedure spreads an aggressive cancer in some women. Tampa General Hospital, BayCare Health System and the Florida Hospital system have joined institutions across the country in suspending use of a motorized blade called the power morcellator.

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Tiny robotic arm could operate on babies in the womb
CNN
Some birth defects in newborns could one day be a thing of the past due to new robotics technologies being developed to perform surgery on babies in the womb. Spina bifida is one such disease, affecting approximately 1 in 2,500 newborns worldwide, where a lesion on the back leaves the spinal cord exposed in the womb, leading to severe disabilities, learning difficulties and sometimes death.
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Anonymous peer feedback through social networking helped residents improve their skills
redOrbit
Surgical residents who received anonymous feedback from their peers through a social networking site on their robotic surgery skills improved more than those who did not receive any peer feedback on their procedures, UCLA researchers found. The study is the first to examine the use of social networking to facilitate peer review of surgical procedure videos, said senior author Dr. Jim Hu, UCLA’s Henry E. Singleton Professor of Urology and director of robotic and minimally invasive surgery in the urology department at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.
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Surgeon's radiation exposure higher with 'freehand' technique
HealthDay News via Healthcare Professionals Network
During pedicle screw placement with the freehand technique, radiation exposure for the surgeon is nearly 10 times higher than with the use of navigation, according to a study published in the June 1 issue of Spine. Jimmy Villard, M.D., from Technische Universitat Munchen in Germany, and colleagues measured radiation exposure experienced by surgeons. Measurements were taken using digital dosimeters placed at the level of the eye, chest and dominant forearm.
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NIH 3-D print exchange may help 3-D models shape the future of science
Medical Daily
If a picture’s worth a thousand words, what’s the value of a 3-D model? The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has decided they are hugely important and so created the 3-D Print Exchange to help you tap this technology. This interactive website allows citizen scientists, researchers, students, and educators to search, browse, download and share biomedical 3-D print files, modeling tutorials and other materials.
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Orthopedic surgeons face challenges treating bone metastasis in long bones spine
Healio — Orthopedics Today
Depending on their practice and specialization area, some orthopedists need to be “sometimes” oncologists when they are responsible for bone metastasis management. For these specialists, it pays to be familiar with recent advances in bone metastasis treatment and to know when their patients’ metastasis is the initial presentation of an unknown cancer.
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Surgeons, patients less likely to accept premium IOLs with high copayments
Healio — Ocular Surgery News
Patients were less likely to accept advanced technology IOLs with higher copayments, according to a study. In addition, surgeons were less likely to suggest premium IOLs as copayments rose. Patients and surgeons participated in online interviews and were shown unbranded profiles of toric, multifocal and toric multifocal IOLs. The interviews were designed to gauge patients’ willingness to accept the lenses and surgeons’ willingness to suggest the implants.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Is routine cholangiography during cholecystectomy a good idea? (Medscape (Free login required))
Are new surgeons unprepared to practice surgery? (General Surgery News)
Glass to get HIPAA compliance, surgery ready! (Android Headlines)
Study: Needle biopsies may be underused for breast cancer patients (New York Daily News)
IV acetaminophen reduces pain in postoperative craniotomy patients (Pain Medicine News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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