This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




  Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit July 01, 2014

Home   About   Membership   Education & Resources   Publications   AASPA APP   Contact Us


 


AASPA NEWS

2014 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 23-26, 2014 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco, CA, for our 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 14th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Union Square in the heart of incredible San Francisco.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Click here to REGISTER NOW for best pricing!
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article



Register now for the 2014 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco.

Register today!
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


MORE NEWS


Blocking key enzyme minimizes stroke injury
redOrbit
A drug that blocks the action of the enzyme Cdk5 could substantially reduce brain damage if administered shortly after a stroke, UT Southwestern Medical Center research suggests. The findings, reported in the June 11 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, determined in rodent models that aberrant Cdk5 activity causes nerve cell death during stroke.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


5 ways regulators, surgeons and patients use the CBS spinal fusion report
Becker's Hospital Review
An April CBS report examined spinal fusion surgery, using Medicare-released data to discuss trends in fusion use and investigate potentially unnecessary procedures; now CBS is reporting on reaction to their original investigation.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
How many metastases rule out ablation?
Medscape (free login required)
David Kerr, Professor of Cancer Medicine at the University of Oxford, in the United Kingdom, with a long-standing interest in gastrointestinal cancer. He discusses the recently published results of the CELIM trials. This study randomly assigned 111 patients to combination chemotherapy with FOLFIRI plus cetuximab vs FOLFOX plus cetuximab. an excellent

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Keratoprosthesis restores vision in patients blinded by corneal disease
News-Medical
A new review article in the June issue of Focal Points, a monthly publication of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, calls keratoprosthesis a viable alternative to standard corneal transplantation to help people suffering from corneal blindness.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
New brain implant conquers vertigo
Scientific American (subscription required)
Surgeons have implanted a new prosthesis in four patients to correct disabling dizziness. The device may someday restore balance to hundreds of thousands more.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Top 5 tests to avoid in neurosurgery: Choosing wisely
Medscape (free login required)
As part of the Choosing Wisely initiative, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) have released a list of the 5 tests or procedures that are commonly ordered, but not always necessary, in neurosurgery. Medscape shows discusses the 5 "evidence-based recommendations" can support physicians in working with their patients to make wise choices about their care.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Surgical biopsies can be safely performed on selected patients with late-stage lung cancer
News-Medical
Researchers at UC Davis have determined that surgical biopsies can be safely performed on select patients with late-stage non-small cell lung cancer, which should enhance their access to drugs that target specific genetic mutations such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The findings, to be published in the July issue of The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, address a common problem in treatment for advanced lung cancer: insufficient tumor tissue available for molecular analysis, which is required before prescribing targeted therapy.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


ICD-9-CM codes often fail to match surgeons' lumbar fusion indications
Pain Medicine News
Although several studies have used administrative databases to investigate the recent rise in lumbar spinal fusion surgery, a new study has found that reliance on such databases can lead to error. Specifically, primary International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes submitted to the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) often do not match the surgeon’s indications for lumbar fusion.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Heads-up display for surgeons moves closer to launch
MedCity News
Some startups you hear from in the beginning, when everything is new and exciting, but then they go radio silent. Either things aren’t going well and the entrepreneurs in charge don’t want to talk about it, or things are going so well that there’s no time for press interviews. Parallax doesn’t have either problem.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Endockscope: Bringing mHealth into the OR
medGadget
While consumers are finding it easier than ever to play an active role in their healthcare by leveraging smartphones and tablets, clinicians are also finding new opportunities to take advantage of mobile devices at the point of care. We had a chance to sit down with Dr. Hak Lee, a Urologic Oncology Fellow at the University of California San Diego, and Dr. William Sohn, a Clinical Instructor at Vanderbilt University, to learn about the Endockscope, a new device that allows a smartphone to capture images during endoscopy procedures.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Early surgical follow-up with primary care physicians can cut hospital readmissions
redOrbit
Patients who have post-operative complications following high-risk surgery have a significantly lower risk of being readmitted to the hospital within 30 days if they go see their primary care physician soon following discharge, a new study in JAMA Surgery.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


A new use for touchless technology in operating rooms
Science Codex
Pioneering work using touchless technology for vascular surgery is now being extended to neurosurgery. Following the successful pilot of the technology in vascular surgery procedures, the team from Lancaster and Microsoft have now partnered with neurosurgeons at Addenbrookes NHS Foundation Trust and Cambridge University to apply the technology to the manipulation of 3-D volumetric models of the brain for neurosurgery. The new system is currently being piloted in the operating theatres.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Will robots render surgeons obsolete? (Bloomberg)
Bone cement tied to rare severe hip surgery outcomes (Medscape (Free login required))

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
Contribute news

This edition of AASPA Newsline was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
June 24, 2014
June 17, 2014
June 10, 2014
June 3, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063