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Early surgery may benefit some with heart infection
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
People with an advanced form of a heart infection called endocarditis may do better if they undergo early surgery than if they are treated with antibiotics initially, a new study suggests. Infective or bacterial endocarditis occurs when bacteria settles in the heart lining or heart valve. In advanced cases, the abnormal bacterial growth, often called vegetation, can be large enough to break off and travel elsewhere in the body, such as to the brain, where it may cause a stroke. More



 AASPA News


Deadline for the 12th Annual AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update is Aug. 30
AASPA    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article

We hope you will join us at the Hilton Suites Chicago/Magnificent Mile in Chicago for our 12th Annual AASPA CME Meeting, Sept. 27-30.

Join fellow Surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, Pre-PA Students and surgical industry leaders at the 12th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

If you are looking for a qualified Surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with Surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

For more information, including on how to sponsor or exhibit at the meeting, go to www.aaspa.com.

Also, check out the new Chicago Like a Local blog! It's full of the latest and greatest in Chicago and updated daily!
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Fundamental Critical Care Support course
AASPA    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article

According to the Society of Critical Care, this Fundamental Critical Care Support Course is a two-day comprehensive course addressing fundamental management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. It will prepare you for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged. It is also designed to assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient and to prepare nurses and other critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.

Course Purpose
• To better prepare the non-intensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged
• To assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient
• To prepare house staff for ICU coverage
•To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.

Course Objectives
• Prioritize assessment needs for the critically ill patient
• Select appropriate diagnostic tests
• Identify and respond to significant changes in the unstable patient
• Recognize and initiate management of acute life-threatening conditions
• Determine the need for expert consultation and/or patient transfer and prepare the practitioner for optimally accomplishing transfer

For more information and to register, go to our website.
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Physician Assistant Job Opportunities
Explore a life-changing career as a Physician Assistant at Mayo Clinic. Experience the exceptional environment of one of the world’s cutting edge health care institutions. MORE
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To find out how to feature your company in the AASPA Newsline and other advertising opportunities, Contact James DeBois at 469-420-2618 MORE


 More News


Prostate surgery tied to need for bladder surgery
Reuters    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
One in 20 men who have their prostate gland removed may need a second surgery for severe loss of bladder control, new research from Canada suggests. Based on more than 25,000 men who had prostate surgery, the study also found that rates of subsequent surgery for urinary incontinence doubled between five and 15 years after the first operation. More

What clementines can teach surgeons
NPR    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
VideoBrief Clementines and pelvic anatomy are two things you probably wouldn't ever talk about in the same sentence, unless you're Pamela Andreatta. Andreatta, a medical educator at the University of Michigan Medical School, knows all about how people learn. And lately, she's been spending a lot of time scrutinizing how residents are taught to do minimally invasive surgery. More

Study: Hybrid surgical and catheter AF approach feasible, highly effective
TheHeart.org    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A hybrid procedure that combines transvenous catheter and minimally invasive thorascopic surgical ablation can be safely and effectively performed in patients with paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation, research shows. More



Toddler recovering after surgeons remove 33-pound tumor
The Associated Press via The Huffington Post    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
VideoBrief Mexican doctors say they have successfully removed a 33-pound benign tumor from the body of a 2-year-old child. Dr. Gustavo Hernandez says the tumor was heavier than the child who at the time of the June 14 surgery weighed 26 pounds. More

National trial will treat high blood pressure with kidney surgery
The Plain Dealer    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Doctors and surgeons are testing a radical surgical treatment for these patients that harks back to a crude but successful technique used in the 1950s. In the new procedure, called renal denervation, a cardiologist threads a specialized instrument through a tube in the arteries of the kidney and uses radio-frequency pulses to disrupt the nerve connections there, cutting communication between the brain and the kidneys. More

Bariatric surgery may stave off diabetic kidney problems
MedPage Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
More than half of obese patients with diabetic nephropathy had resolution of the condition following bariatric surgery, a small retrospective study showed. In the subgroup of diabetic patients without nephropathy, 25 percent developed albuminuria during more than 5 years of follow-up after weight-loss surgery. More

State spending for weight-loss surgery increases
The New York Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
As the numbers of obese in Texas have swelled, so has the comfort of state and federal lawmakers with spending taxpayer dollars on weight-loss surgery for the elderly and the poor. More
 

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Domini Davis, Content Editor, 469.420.2661   
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