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3-D printing help surgeons hone skills for real-life surgery
Digital Journal
Mark Ginsberg, an Iowa jewelry store owner and manufacturer, has partnered with physicians to help surgeons practice for the real thing before they ever go into the operating room, using 3-D printing. Ginsberg is the owner of M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art whose manufacturing facility is above his jewelry shop where two 3-D printers are housed.
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Frankenstein-style head transplants could soon be a reality
Daily Mail
It has until now been the work of science fiction and horror films, but scientists could soon be carrying out complete human head transplants, a leading surgeon has said. The procedure has previously been performed on monkeys but recent technological breakthroughs that make it possible to reconnect spinal cords could see the operation carried out on humans.
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AASPA NEWS


2013 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 3-6 at the Hilton Alexandria Old Town in Alexandria, Va., for our 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting in 2013.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 13th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Alexandria Old Town in the heart of historical Old Town Alexandria, Va.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

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MORE NEWS


70 percent of US plastic surgeons use fat grafting techniques for breast reconstruction
News-Medical.net
Seventy percent of U.S. plastic surgeons have used fat grafting techniques for breast operations, but they are more likely to use it for breast reconstruction rather than cosmetic breast surgery, reports a survey study in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). Once discouraged, fat grafting to the breast is an increasingly common plastic surgery technique, according to the new report. But more data is needed to optimize the technique and outcomes of fat grafting for breast reconstruction, according to a published report from a team led by ASPS Member Surgeon Dr. J. Peter Rubin of University of Pittsburgh and Russell Kling.
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Surgeon's experience a key factor in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery outcomes
Ocular Surgery News
Once past the learning curve, surgeons previously inexperienced with femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery achieved complication rates similar to those achieved by more experienced surgeons, according to a study. Surgeons initially involved in a “learning curve” study were assessed in a follow-up study that examined surgical outcomes once the learning period was concluded. Both studies appeared in Ophthalmology.
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Study finds half of plastic surgeons use social media
PR Web
Half of the plastic surgeons responding to a recent survey reported using social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to connect with patients. The finding doesn't surprise Dr. Louis C. Cutolo, Jr., whose Staten Island cosmetic surgery practice serves Brooklyn and other areas of New York City.

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Doctor performs 1st Google Glass-equipped surgery
PC Magazine
Dr. Rafael Grossmann, of the Eastern Maine Medical Center, recently performed his first Google surgery with Google Glass in tow. As far as we can tell, it's also the first such Google Glass-equipped surgery in the device's history — complete with a corresponding Google...

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Doctors saved lives, if not legs, in Boston
The New York Times
So many patients arrived at once, with variations of the same gruesome leg injuries. Shattered bones, shredded tissue, nails burrowed deep beneath the flesh. The decision had to be made, over and over, with little time to deliberate. "As an orthopedic surgeon, we see patients...

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New tissue engineering breakthrough encourages nerve repair
Nanowerk
A new combination of tissue engineering techniques could reduce the need for nerve grafts, according to new research by The Open University. Regeneration of nerves is challenging when the damaged area is extensive, and surgeons currently have to take a nerve graft from elsewhere in the body, leaving a second site of damage. Nerve grafts contain aligned tissue structures and Schwann cells that support and guide neuron growth through the damaged area, encouraging function to be restored.
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More than meets the eye: Death rates not effective measurement of surgical performance
Medical Daily
Surgeries are often used to prevent chronic diseases from getting worse or unbearable. The doctors who perform them are usually trained very well in their specialty and can be trusted to do a good job. However, everyone makes mistakes, and surgeries can go awry. A new study reveals that reporting death rates after surgery is unlikely to reveal whether a surgeon's performance was poor.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How Medtronic uses iPad games to train surgeons (Mobile Health News)
Robotic surgery firm faulted in FDA report (Medscape Today)
New guidelines broaden eligibility for bariatric surgery (General Surgery News)
Is doc-specific data next? (Modern Healthcare)
Postoperative pain management in anorectal surgery (General Surgery News)
Surgical migraine 'cure' triggers doubts (Medpage Today)
Patient-side robotic surgical platform (Today's Medical Developments)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


New approaches to understanding infection may uncover novel therapies against influenza
Infection Control Today
The influenza virus’ ability to mutate quickly has produced new, emerging strains that make drug discovery more critical than ever. For the first time, researchers at Seattle BioMed, along with collaborators at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the University of Washington, have mapped how critical molecules regulate both the induction and resolution of inflammation during flu infection. The results are published this month in the journal Cell.
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Low statistical power leads to false reassurance when examining surgical outcomes
2minutemedicine.com
In this study it was shown that the complication and morality statistics have become increasingly important in an era of pay-for-performance medicine. Outcomes data not only drive reimbursements by insurance companies but also care-related recommendations published by specialized governing bodies and medical decisions made by patients and their physicians.
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Customize your knee replacement joint for optimal results
Tri-Town News
Total knee replacement is a common and safe surgery used to relieve severe pain and disability caused by osteoarthritis or traumatic injury, resulting in the breakdown of knee cartilage. More than 700,000 of these surgeries were completed in 2012 and nine out of 10 patients reported dramatic pain relief.Total knee replacement operations more than doubled between 1999 and 2008 in the United States.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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