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AASPA NEWS

2015 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 1 – 4, 2015 at the Hilton Suites Chicago/Magnificent Mile, Chicago, Illinois, for our 15th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 15th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Suites Chicago in the heart of incredible Chicago.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Register now for the 2015 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.
    Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 15th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Suites Chicago/Magnificent Mile.

Register today!


INDUSTRY NEWS


Future knee implants will be made by silkworms
Health24
If you think silk is soft and delicate, think again. Researchers have now created specialised knee implants made from silk worm fibres to help with joint damage and osteoarthritis. Around the world knee replacement surgeries are on the rise. In the U.S alone, total knee replacement surgeries tripled from 2003 and 2009, a press release by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons explains.
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CMS announces flexibility when enforcing proper ICD-10 submissions on claim forms
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
On Monday, July 6, in a joint press release with the American Medical Association, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced that it is giving health professionals more flexibility when enforcing proper ICD-10 submissions on claim forms: "In response to requests from the provider community, CMS is releasing additional guidance that will allow for flexibility in the claims auditing and quality reporting process as the medical community gains experience using the new ICD-10 code set."
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Beyond tech: The human side of remote monitoring and health call centers
By Karen R. Thomas
What comes to mind when you think about remote patient monitoring? The first thing most people think of are the various technologies that make this transfer of health data possible. They envision the remote monitoring devices that collect data such as weight, pulse, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, blood glucose readings and so on, and transmit that data back to a technology hub.
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Study: When new doctors 'train' during surgery risks don't rise
HealthDay News
People undergoing brain or spine surgery are at no greater risk if doctors-in-training — called residents — assist during the operation, a new study suggests. Researchers found that residents are supervised and their assistance doesn't increase the risk for complications or death.
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Bone-tendon-bone grafts not necessarily a better choice for ACL reconstruction
Medical Xpress
Surgeons making reconstruction choices for an injured ACL can consider both bone-tendon-bone grafts and hamstring autografts as equally viable options in regards to healing, as reported in research today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida.
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The pleiotropic art of medicine
Medscape (free login required)
The practice of medicine is complex. It's an art. Art can benefit from the adoption of new technology, growing in its robustness and expression. Technology can spread access to both art and healthcare. But neither can grow in the face of inadequate standards or perverse incentives.
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Study shows organ rejection can be overcome
Medical News Today
The body's "immune memory" of a rejected transplant may not be a permanent state, meaning a subsequent transplant can be successful, suggests a study of organs in mice. Published in Nature Communications, the study used transplanted hearts in mice and induced tolerance and then rejection before doing a second transplantation a week after rejection of the initial graft.
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Major health providers place limits on low-volume 'cowboy' surgeons to stop patient deaths
Fierce Healthcare
Health providers are cracking down on surgeons who put patients at risk by conducting surgical procedures that they don't usually perform. Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire, Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore and University of Michigan hospitals now place limits on 10 complicated procedures that are exponentially more dangerous when performed by surgeons whose skills are rusty, according to U.S. News & World Report.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Anesthesiologist found guilty after verbally abusing patient (Joan Spitrey)
7 of the most innovative hospitals around the world (Empowher)
Case study: protection of healthcare staff from surgical smoke in operating theatres (Personnel Today)
My patient. Your patient, Our patient: Making medicine better for everyone (Huffington Post)
Never do unto others what you wouldn't do to yourself (Medscape (Subscription required))

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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