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2014 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 23-26, 2014 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco, CA, for our 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 14th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Union Square in the heart of incredible San Francisco.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Click here to REGISTER NOW for best pricing!
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Register now for the 2014 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco.

Register today!
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MORE NEWS


Cataract surgery may cut cognitive decline in dementia
Medscape
Cataract surgery may reduce the rate of cognitive decline and improve vision, cognition, and quality of life in dementia patients, new research suggests. Preliminary results from an ongoing prospective study conducted by investigators at Case Western University in Cleveland, Ohio, showed that in a cohort of patients with dementia and clinically significant cataracts, immediate cataract surgery improved visual acuity, visual quality of life, and behavioral symptoms. It also appeared to slow the rate of cognitive decline, decrease neuropsychiatric symptoms, and reduce caregiver stress.
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Bleeding-control polymer gel for brain surgery, polymer implants attack brain cancer
Plastemart.com
A spray-on gel to staunch bleeding during brain surgery has been developed by New Jersey Institute of Technology. Surgeons can spray the gel onto a surgical site, and the natural bio-polymer solutions in the gel will cohere and control bleeding in the patient within 30 seconds. The gel can shorten an intracranial surgery by 30-45 minutes. It will translate into less time for the patient's skull to be open and less anesthesia, reducing both the possibility of infection and morbidity.
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3-D-printed anatomy may replace cadavers for medical training
redOrbit.
Three-dimensional printing may soon replace human cadavers in the study of gross human anatomy in the world's medical schools. The practice of learning on medical cadavers is a rite of passage in the medical education community that is instrumental in informing students on the complex inner workings of the muscular, skeletal and circulatory systems of the human body. Medical schools rely on good-natured individuals who bequeath their bodies for the advancement of science for their supply of study cadavers.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Cataract surgery may cut cognitive decline in dementia
Medscape
Cataract surgery may reduce the rate of cognitive decline and improve vision, cognition, and quality of life in dementia patients, new research suggests. Preliminary results from an ongoing prospective study conducted by investigators at Case Western University in Cleveland, Ohio, showed that in a cohort of patients with dementia and clinically significant cataracts, immediate cataract surgery improved visual acuity, visual quality of life, and behavioral symptoms. It also appeared to slow the rate of cognitive decline, decrease neuropsychiatric symptoms, and reduce caregiver stress.

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How many metastases rule out ablation?
Medscape (free login required)
David Kerr, Professor of Cancer Medicine at the University of Oxford, in the United Kingdom, with a long-standing interest in gastrointestinal cancer. He discusses the recently published results of the CELIM trials. This study randomly assigned 111 patients to combination chemotherapy with FOLFIRI plus cetuximab vs FOLFOX plus cetuximab. an excellent

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Are a third of knee replacements 'inappropriate?'
Medscape (free login required)
One third of total knee replacement surgeries in the United States may be "inappropriate," according to an article published online June 30 in Arthritis & Rheumatism. The findings point to the need for the development of consensus patient selection criteria for the surgery, the authors write.

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No anti-clotting treatment needed for most kids undergoing spine surgeries
Medical Xpress
Blood clots occur so rarely in children undergoing spine operations that most patients require nothing more than vigilant monitoring after surgery and should be spared risky and costly anti-clotting medications, according to a new Johns Hopkins Children's Center study.
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Study: Emergency weekend surgeries riskier for kids
The News Journal
Children who have emergency surgery on weekends are at greater risk for complications and potentially even death than those who have weekday surgeries, according to a new study. However, the Johns Hopkins researchers noted that the risk of death was "miniscule." The researchers analyzed data on nearly 440,000 simple emergency surgeries that children across the United States underwent over a 22-year period.
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Does interoperability have to be hard?
FCW
The ideal of interoperable electronic health records isn't hard to understand. Data that moves freely across a patient record from multiple points of care means that tests that might have been duplicated in the past get performed only once, it means that doctors get an accurate read on medical history, and patient data can be aggregated for research and analytics, leading to faster advances in diagnostics and treatments.
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Americans prefer surgeries, drugs for weight loss
International Business Times
Americans prefer to consume weight loss medications drugs and weight loss surgery, in comparison to self-modification, which includes a healthy diet and exercise, reveals a study published in the Science Daily. The findings were shared at the annual International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society meeting, held in Chicago recently.
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Study: UK patients denied vital surgeries
PressTV
British patients are being denied vital surgeries by National Health Service bodies, which are ignoring guidelines and choosing to ration some operations, a study shows.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Are a third of knee replacements 'inappropriate?' (Medscape (free login required))
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AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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