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3-D printed splint for toddler's windpipe saves his life
Medical News Today
Researchers from the University of Illinois, the Institute of Genomic Biology (IGB), and the University of Michigan developed a 3-D printed splint, which was sewn around Kaiba's tracheotomy tube in order to expand his collapsed windpipe and provide support for tissue growth.
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Less practice for surgeons-in-training after restrictions
Fox News
Surgeons-in-training had fewer opportunities to take part in operations after restrictions on their working hours were put in place in July 2011, according to a new analysis. Researchers tracking a group of first-year surgical residents during 2011 and 2012 found the trainee surgeons took part in an average of 26 percent fewer operations than their counterparts in the previous four years.
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AASPA NEWS


2013 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 3-6 at the Hilton Alexandria Old Town in Alexandria, Va., for our 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting in 2013.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 13th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Alexandria Old Town in the heart of historical Old Town Alexandria, Va.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

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Duke surgeons implant bioengineered vein
Science Daily
In a first-of-its-kind operation in the United States, a team of doctors at Duke University Hospital helped create a bioengineered blood vessel and implanted it into the arm of a patient with end-stage kidney disease. The procedure, the first U.S. clinical trial to test the safety and effectiveness of the bioengineered blood vessel, is a milestone in the field of tissue engineering. The new vein is an off-the-shelf, human cell-based product with no biological properties that would cause organ rejection.
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3 popular facial plastic surgeries for the elderly
Health News Digest
According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 29 percent of all cosmetic surgeries are on people between the ages of 51 and 64. Those 65 or older make up another 8 percent. Senior citizens are embracing the chance to boost self-confidence by correcting some of the bothersome signs of aging. A visit to Virginia Beach nose surgeon and facial plastic surgeon Dr. Kyle S. Choe can help you to keep looking and feeling younger in your golden years.
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Report finds telehealth services are cost effective, clinically successful
Modern Healthcare
Studies of healthcare systems in the U.S. and abroad show providers have achieved financial and clinical success with implementing telehealth services, according to a report by the healthcare research arm of Computer Sciences Corp.

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Doctor performs 1st Google Glass-equipped surgery
PC Magazine
Dr. Rafael Grossmann, of the Eastern Maine Medical Center, recently performed his first Google surgery with Google Glass in tow. As far as we can tell, it's also the first such Google Glass-equipped surgery in the device's history — complete with a corresponding Google...

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Doctors saved lives, if not legs, in Boston
The New York Times
So many patients arrived at once, with variations of the same gruesome leg injuries. Shattered bones, shredded tissue, nails burrowed deep beneath the flesh. The decision had to be made, over and over, with little time to deliberate. "As an orthopedic surgeon, we see patients...

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Contaminated reusable surface disinfectant dispensers pose potential for infection
Infection Control Today
Reusable surface disinfectant (SD) tissue dispensers are used in hospitals in many countries because they allow immediate access to soaked tissues for targeted surface decontamination. Kampf et al. (2013) determined the frequency of contaminated SD solutions in reusable dispensers and the ability of isolates to multiply in different formulations. Dispensers with different SD were randomly collected from healthcare facilities. Solutions were investigated for bacterial contamination using standard microbiological methods.
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Computational modeling enables surgeons to fit joint replacements with longer, optimized lifespans
News-Medical.net
Researchers at the University of Southampton have completed a project that will enable surgeons to fit joint replacements with longer, optimised lifespans. The MXL project uses computational modelling to define the mechanics of an artificial joint -- a complex interaction of individual anatomy, prosthesis design, sizing and placement -- to ensure successful surgery and longer lifespans of the prosthetic joints.
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Transfusions with heart surgery and infection risk
The News International
Patients who receive a red blood cell transfusion during or after heart surgery may be at greater risk for infection, according to a new study. However, the use of platelets during transfusions does not appear to carry a similar risk. Limiting red blood cell use could result in fewer major postoperative infections, the researchers suggested. The study is published in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Frankenstein-style head transplants could soon be a reality (Daily Mail)
3-D printing help surgeons hone skills for real-life surgery (Digital Journal)
70 percent of US plastic surgeons use fat grafting techniques for breast reconstruction (News-Medical.net)
Customize your knee replacement joint for optimal results (Tri-Town News)
More than meets the eye: Death rates not effective measurement of surgical performance (Medical Daily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Physician assistants in rural America
By Maria Frisch
There is a shortage of doctors in rural America, and this is not a new problem. In 1977, the U.S. Congress enacted the Rural Health Clinics Act (Public Law [PL] 95-210) to address this issue. This act supported the work of physician assistants (PAs) in rural areas by entitling PAs to receive reimbursement from Medicare and Medicaid on a cost basis, thereby improving care access and reducing care costs in underserved areas. Since 2009, federally qualified rural clinics have received significant federal support, designed to improve access to cost-efficient care. Physician assistant programs also receive government funding to boost the primary care work force, in hopes of bolstering the numbers of providers who branch out to rural care.
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Industry Pulse: What is the most appealing aspect of working in a rural practice?
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Rare cancer treated with surgery, internal chemotherapy technique
Health Canal
Carla Hamilton, 56, of West Chester, NY, knew something wasn’t right in the spring of 2011. A junior high health and physical education teacher, Hamilton was busy coaching track and put off her annual gynecologic checkup for a few months. Her exam confirmed what Hamilton knew to be true—her ovaries were enlarged to the size of a grapefruit and orange, respectively. She was referred to a gynecologic oncologist and had surgery to remove her ovaries for suspected ovarian cancer.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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