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2014 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 23-26, 2014 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco, CA, for our 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 14th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Union Square in the heart of incredible San Francisco.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Click here to REGISTER NOW for best pricing!
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Register now for the 2014 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco.

Register today!
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MORE NEWS


3-D printing used to improve surgeries for bone fractures
HNGN
Surgeons at the University of Verona Hospital in Italy are using 3-D printing to improve the effectiveness of severe orthopedic trauma surgeries when they are first done. The goal is being met by using a Stratasys 3-D printer to print replicas of bone fractures, which is enabling the surgeons to practice surgeries in advance, according to OrthoSpineNews.
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Minimally invasive surgery use varies widely
Medscape
Minimally invasive surgical procedures can halve the risk for postoperative complications compared with open procedures, but they are still being used infrequently in many U.S. hospitals, results of a retrospective study suggest. The use of minimally invasive procedures varies widely among U.S. hospitals, with urban hospitals being more than 4 times as likely as rural hospitals to perform laparoscopic appendectomies and colectomies and 15 times more likely to perform minimally invasive hysterectomies, report Michol A. Cooper, M.D., a surgical resident at John Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, and colleagues.
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Dermatologists preferred for cutaneous, surgical cosmetic procedures
Healio
In a study to assess the opinion of the general public, dermatologists were chosen as the preferred provider type to address certain cutaneous surgery and cosmetic procedures. Researchers administered an internet-based survey to 354 adults in the lay public. Participants were asked to choose the type of healthcare provider — dermatologist, plastic surgeon, primary care physician, general surgeon or nurse practitioner/physician’s assistant — they would prefer to perform various cutaneous cosmetic and surgical procedures.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Patients remain in danger from preventable errors
FierceHealthcare
Patients today are no safer from harm caused by preventable errors than they were 15 years ago, a leading healthcare expert testified before the Senate Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging Thursday. In terms of error reduction and quality improvement, "[w]e have not moved the needle in any meaningful. demonstrable way overall," testified Ashish Jha, M.D., a professor at Harvard School of Public Health.

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Cataract surgery may cut cognitive decline in dementia
Medscape
Cataract surgery may reduce the rate of cognitive decline and improve vision, cognition, and quality of life in dementia patients, new research suggests. Preliminary results from an ongoing prospective study conducted by investigators at Case Western University in Cleveland, Ohio, showed that in a cohort of patients with dementia and clinically significant cataracts, immediate cataract surgery improved visual acuity, visual quality of life, and behavioral symptoms. It also appeared to slow the rate of cognitive decline, decrease neuropsychiatric symptoms, and reduce caregiver stress.

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How many metastases rule out ablation?
Medscape (free login required)
David Kerr, Professor of Cancer Medicine at the University of Oxford, in the United Kingdom, with a long-standing interest in gastrointestinal cancer. He discusses the recently published results of the CELIM trials. This study randomly assigned 111 patients to combination chemotherapy with FOLFIRI plus cetuximab vs FOLFOX plus cetuximab. an excellent

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Anticoagulant drugs not necessary for all children undergoing spine surgery
Medical Daily
Blood clots are one of the risks associated with spine corrective surgery. To reduce this risk, patients are generally administered potent drugs, which while effective, come with their own set of side effects. Now, new research shows that most children undergoing spine operations may never develop blood clots and hence need not be administered these risky and expensive anticoagulant drugs.
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Saltier saline can reduce surgical complications
newsworks
Medical innovations don't have to come in the form of cutting-edge surgical robots. Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University have found success just by tinkering with the basic IV drip. Professor of surgery Harish Lavu said a common problem for patients undergoing extended surgeries is an accumulation of the saline that's given to keep them hydrated, with normal blood pressure and proper organ function.
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Surgical treatment improving for pancreatic cancer patients
WCJB-TV
Pancreatic cancer has long been viewed as a death sentence - and with good reason - it's currently the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., but it's expected to become the second within the next two decades. The outlook is still grim, but research and improvements in care at one Gainesville, Florida, hospital aim to help current and future patients. Barbara Adams of Ocala is in her second week of chemo and radiation. She noticed something was wrong when she experienced jaundice, dark urine and weight loss.
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Subjective estimation of ILM peeling surface without dye improves with experience
Healio
Junior and senior surgeons’ ability to subjectively estimate the internal limiting membrane peeling surface without the use of dye was fair; however, surface areas were larger for more-experienced surgeons, researchers found. In a prospective study, 30 eyes of 30 patients underwent epiretinal membrane surgery; half of the patients had surgery performed by a senior surgeon, and the other half had surgery performed by two junior surgeons.
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Stroke within past 9 months linked with adverse surgical outcomes
2 minute medicine
Stroke is a major risk factor for adverse outcomes in non-cardiac surgeries. However, it is unknown whether there is an association between time elapsed after ischemic stroke and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE, which includes ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death) or all-cause mortality after surgery.
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Mortality rates decrease for hip and knee replacement surgeries in older patients
News-Medical
Over the past decade, a greater number of patients, age 80 and older, are having elective orthopaedic surgery. A new study appearing in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS) found that these surgeries are generally safe with mortality rates decreasing for total hip (THR) and total knee (TKR) replacement and spinal fusion surgeries, and complication rates decreasing for total knee replacement and spinal fusion in patients with few or no comorbidities (other conditions or diseases).
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    3-D-printed anatomy may replace cadavers for medical training (redOrbit.)
Cataract surgery may cut cognitive decline in dementia (Medscape)
Bleeding-control polymer gel for brain surgery, polymer implants attack brain cancer (Plastemart.com)
Study: Emergency weekend surgeries riskier for kids (The News Journal)
Study: UK patients denied vital surgeries (PressTV)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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