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Distractions in operating room make errors more likely
MedPage Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Surgery residents committed eight times as many errors during simulated procedures when realistic distractions and interruptions were introduced than when they completed procedures without interruption, investigators reported. The residents made major surgical errors during 8 of 18 simulated procedures with distractions versus only 1 of 18 operations that occurred without intrusions. More



Study: Surgery not best option for early-stage prostate cancers
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
When a man learns he has localized prostate cancer, he has to make the difficult choice of surgery, and its possible side effects or watchful waiting. Now, a large, long-term study suggests that surgery to remove the prostate is no better than careful monitoring: Among men with low-grade, early-stage cancers, a radical prostatectomy did not reduce the risk of death from prostate cancer or from any other cause. More

 AASPA News


Fundamental Critical Care Support course
AASPA    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article

According to the Society of Critical Care, this Fundamental Critical Care Support Course is a two-day comprehensive course addressing fundamental management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. It will prepare you for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged. It is also designed to assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient and to prepare nurses and other critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.

Course Purpose
• To better prepare the non-intensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged
• To assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient
• To prepare house staff for ICU coverage
•To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.

Course Objectives
• Prioritize assessment needs for the critically ill patient
• Select appropriate diagnostic tests
• Identify and respond to significant changes in the unstable patient
• Recognize and initiate management of acute life-threatening conditions
• Determine the need for expert consultation and/or patient transfer and prepare the practitioner for optimally accomplishing transfer

For more information and to register, go to our website.


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Medical costs may remain high after weight-loss surgery
The New York Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A new study suggests that older men who undergo bariatric surgery to lose weight may not see any reductions in medical costs in the years that follow, a finding that runs counter to the widely touted claim that the significant weight loss that typically follows bariatric operations leads to vast reductions in medical expenses. More

Retinal detachment risk from cataract surgery falls
Reuters    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The risk of a person's retina detaching after having a cataract removed is dropping, says a new study. Australian researchers found that the number of people who needed their retina reattached after their cataract was removed fell from about 1 in 100 between 1989 and 1993 to 1 in 400 between 1999 and 2001. More

For tiniest patients, fetal surgery delivers big results
MyHealthNewsDaily.com via NBC News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
On Nov. 7, 2006, Mary Kelly went for a routine pregnancy ultrasound. Three days later, she and her unborn daughter had become pioneers. Kelly and her daughter, Addison, now 5 years old, were the second mother and child to undergo a fetal surgery procedure where doctors removed a tumor between the heart and lungs that was causing heart failure and fetal hydrops — a condition where Addison was taking on so much fluid that she would not likely survive. More



Complications following two-level axial lumbar interbody fusion
MedicalXpress    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Surgeons from the Instituto de Patologia da Coluna in Sao Paulo, Brazil, have found that an innovative minimally invasive surgical procedure performed to achieve two-level axial lumbar interbody fusion produced immediate successful results, but within two years complications set in, making the procedure far less desirable. More

Study: Hospitals hype robot surgery for women
Reuters    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Consumers shouldn't expect straight talk about robot surgery from hospital websites, but rather vague claims and marketing mantras, according to a new U.S. study. Researchers sifted through online information from 432 hospitals across the country and found nearly half marketed robotic surgery for gynecologic conditions such as endometriosis or cervical cancer. More

Overthinking laparoscopic surgery training
General Surgery News (blog)    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Are we overthinking the training of residents in minimally invasive surgery? Two recent papers in prominent surgical journals suggest the answer is "Yes." More
 

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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