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2014 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 23-26, 2014 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco, CA, for our 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 14th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Union Square in the heart of incredible San Francisco.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Click here to REGISTER NOW for best pricing!
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Register now for the 2014 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco.

Register today!
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MORE NEWS


How 3-D systems' medical modeling is changing the operating room for the better
3-D Print
During the recent 3-D Systems’ 2014 Investor & Analyst Day, one of the key issues addressed was the new frontiers in medical technology. At 3-D Systems, healthcare appears to be the fastest growing market. The med-1management team stated its plans to build up its leadership in this field. The company plans to invest and expand its virtual surgical planning capabilities, broaden its range of implants and surgical tool manufacturing and develop new personalized medical devices, such as the recently introduced bespoke scoliosis brace.
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4 considerations before asking aging surgeons to give up the scalpel
FierceHealthcare
Are your aging surgeons' skill levels still up to par? The topic is often a minefield as it involves issues of surgeon dignity and autonomy, physician-nurse relationships, patient care quality and evolving care standards, according to Medscape.
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Blades inside the cabin: The next step in air medical services
By Mark Huber
Earlier this year I wrote about the growing trend of performing airborne blood transfusions on trauma patients. What's the next logical step? Airborne surgery. Performing life-saving medical procedures in the air is not a new phenomenon — the U.S. Air Force has been doing it for years. Over the last decade, the practice has spread to the civil sector, mainly in specially-equipped airliners turned into air ambulances. But you don't need the massive cabin of a converted airliner to perform life-saving procedures.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
More than 200 teeth removed from teen with rare condition
KWTX-TV
Dental surgeons in Mumbai, India said they were surprised by the number of teeth they had to remove from the mouth of a teenage boy with a rare condition. In all the surgeons removed 232 teeth. The 17-year-old boy has odontoma, in which a tumor grows under a gum and creates smaller tooth-like growths called denticles.

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Patients remain in danger from preventable errors
FierceHealthcare
Patients today are no safer from harm caused by preventable errors than they were 15 years ago, a leading healthcare expert testified before the Senate Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging Thursday. In terms of error reduction and quality improvement, "[w]e have not moved the needle in any meaningful. demonstrable way overall," testified Ashish Jha, M.D., a professor at Harvard School of Public Health.

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Cataract surgery may cut cognitive decline in dementia
Medscape
Cataract surgery may reduce the rate of cognitive decline and improve vision, cognition, and quality of life in dementia patients, new research suggests. Preliminary results from an ongoing prospective study conducted by investigators at Case Western University in Cleveland, Ohio, showed that in a cohort of patients with dementia and clinically significant cataracts, immediate cataract surgery improved visual acuity, visual quality of life, and behavioral symptoms. It also appeared to slow the rate of cognitive decline, decrease neuropsychiatric symptoms, and reduce caregiver stress.

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Study: Robotic surgery no better than traditional surgery for bladder cancer
CBS News
In hospital operating rooms it's becoming more common in the operating room for surgeons to use a robot to do the cutting. It's more precise and less invasive. But is it better for the patient? Robotic surgery has become a selling point for many medical centers across the country. Last year, robots were used in 422,000 surgeries. That's up 15 percent from the year before.
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Robotic, computer-assisted devices struggling to win over orthopedic surgeons
OrthoSpineNews
While computer-assisted and robotic surgery is expected to continue growing, research and consulting firm GlobalData states that the rising utilization of robotic surgeries will have a minimal impact on the orthopedic power tools market. The cost-effectiveness of robotic devices for high-volume surgeries, such as large joint reconstruction and spinal fusion, hasn’t been justified yet.
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New knee implant saves the ligaments
Medical Xpress
A new total knee replacement that saves all of the ligaments can make a person's knee feel and move just like the original. During a traditional total knee replacement, the surgeon must remove the "island" of bone to which the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) are attached. The new knee features a shape that protects that island of bone and saves the ligaments.
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Medical device enables deaf child to hear
Controlled Environments
A Los Angeles team of scientists and surgeons from Keck Medicine of USC, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) reported that sound registered in the brain of a deaf Canadian boy for the first time after doctors activated a hearing device that had been surgically implanted in his brainstem.
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Surgeons in bid to regenerate knee cartilage
Rheumatology Update
U.K. surgeons have pioneered a new knee operation that uses stem cells to coat damaged cartilage with the aim of preventing the development of arthritis. The aim is to regenerate the remaining tissue and create a permanent "like-for-like" replacement.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Mortality rates decrease for hip and knee replacement surgeries in older patients (News-Medical)
Dermatologists preferred for cutaneous, surgical cosmetic procedures (Healio)
Surgical treatment improving for pancreatic cancer patients (WCJB-TV)
Saltier saline can reduce surgical complications (newsworks)
Minimally invasive surgery use varies widely (Medscape)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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