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Novel 3-D simulation helps surgeons train more effectively
ScienceBlog
A novel interactive 3-D simulation platform offers surgical residents a unique opportunity to hone their diagnostic and patient management skills, and then have those skills accurately evaluated according to a new study appearing in the August issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. The findings may help establish a new tool for assessing and training surgical residents.
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AASPA NEWS


2013 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 3-6 at the Hilton Alexandria Old Town in Alexandria, Va., for our 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting in 2013.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 13th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Alexandria Old Town in the heart of historical Old Town Alexandria, Va.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

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Register for the 2013 FCCS - Fundamental Critical Care Support
AASPA
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two day course - 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the non-intensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Old Town Alexandria. Register today!

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Register for the 2013 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
AASPA
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two day course - 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the non-intensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Old Town Alexandria. Register today!

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MORE NEWS


First robotic implantation of an HVAD
The Daily Wildcat
Two surgeons at the University of Arizona Medical Center have performed the world’s first robotic implantation of a ventricular assist device. The Heartware Ventricular Assist Device is a small, mechanical device that is attached to the heart to help pump blood throughout the body. Unlike artificial hearts, which generally replace the heart altogether, VADs are intended to sustain the function of the heart while leaving the organ almost entirely intact.
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Researchers review surgical technology and OR safety failures
Infection Control Today
Surgical technology has led to significant improvements in patient outcomes. However, failures in equipment and technology are implicated in surgical errors and adverse events. Weerakkody, et al. (2013) aim to determine the proportion and characteristics of equipment-related error in the operating room (OR) to further improve quality of care.

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3-D printed splint for toddler's windpipe saves his life
Medical News Today
Researchers from the University of Illinois, the Institute of Genomic Biology (IGB), and the University of Michigan developed a 3-D printed splint, which was sewn around Kaiba's tracheotomy tube in order to expand his collapsed windpipe and provide support for tissue growth.

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Doctor performs 1st Google Glass-equipped surgery
PC Magazine
Dr. Rafael Grossmann, of the Eastern Maine Medical Center, recently performed his first Google surgery with Google Glass in tow. As far as we can tell, it's also the first such Google Glass-equipped surgery in the device's history — complete with a corresponding Google...

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CMS proposal to remove Bariatric Surgery Facility Certification may place Medicare patients at risk
News-Medical.net
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is considering a reversal of its 2006 decision requiring certification of facilities that perform bariatric surgery, a move the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the American College of Surgeons (ACS), and other medical societies say could endanger Medicare patients who undergo bariatric surgery.
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Late outcomes best with carotid artery stenting followed by open-heart surgery
Healio
Of the three most common treatment approaches for patients with severe carotid artery disease and severe CAD, patients who underwent carotid artery stenting followed by open-heart surgery had the best outcomes, according to results of a new study.
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Scientist build artificial ear using sheep and 3-D printer
The Daily Mail
An artificial - and very lifelike - ear has been built by scientists using a 3-D printer and cartilage from sheep. The organ was designed by plastic surgeons to make it look as lifelike as possible. Researchers from Massachusetts then grew the required number of cartilage cells to fit custom models under the skin of lab rats.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    3-D helmet for surgeons turns complex surgery into call of duty (Gizmodo)
Top 4 surgical advances our hospitals should know about (Healthcare Global)
C-sections take longer for obese women (Reuters)
Who should solve the doctor shortage? (DOTmed)
Most physician assistants plan to delay retirement (Cardiovascular Business)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Study: Best stem cells for bone marrow transplant at bone ends
The Vancouver Sun
Stem cells from bone marrow have been helping people with diseases like leukemia to rebuild a healthy blood system for half a century. But now Canadian researchers have determined that not all stem cells are created equal — and that might lead to better bone marrow transplants for more patients.
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Medical mystery continues to stump doctors
By Jessica Taylor
From the NICU to the National Institutes of Health, Ethan Hamilton has seen it all. The 4-year-old has been through countless hospital visits and procedures all to figure out what's going on inside his little body. Despite all of the medical advancements and technology on hand today, a case like Ethan's can still throw doctors and hospitals for a loop. In the last 50 years, research has come up with the answers to so many medical mysteries, but these rare cases still pop up, leaving those in the healthcare field baffled.
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Guidelines suggest a conservative approach, but painkillers, surgeries have increased as back pain treatments
Reuters via MedCity News
Despite guidelines to treat back pain conservatively, the proportion of people prescribed powerful painkillers or referred for surgery and other specialty care has increased in recent years, according to a new study. "This is kind of concerning," said Dr. Steven Cohen, an anesthesiologist and critical care doctor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore who didn't participate in the research.
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AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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