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AASPA NEWS

2015 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 1 – 4, 2015 at the Hilton Suites Chicago/Magnificent Mile, Chicago, Illinois, for our 15th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 15th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Suites Chicago in the heart of incredible Chicago.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Register now for the 2015 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.
    Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 15th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Suites Chicago/Magnificent Mile.

Register today!


INDUSTRY NEWS


Hysterectomy at younger age tied to heart disease risks
HealthDay News
Hysterectomy is associated with an increased likelihood of cardiovascular risk factors and disease, especially among younger women, a new study suggests. Mayo Clinic researchers looked at data from more than 7,600 women. Half of the group had a hysterectomy, while the other half (the "control" group) didn't have the procedure. Women who had a hysterectomy before age 35 were much more likely to have a stroke than age-matched women in the control group, the investigators found.
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Medical scopes and superbugs: Infection risk greater than previously thought
FierceHealthcare
A duodenoscope linked to a recent outbreak of a lethal antibiotic-resistant superbug isn't the only medical scope that may be the source of deadly infections. In fact, the risk of a serious infection from contaminated medical scopes is much broader than previously thought. Although infection experts have warned over the years that many endoscopes can remain dirty even after following the manufacturer's cleaning guidelines, some of those concerns were ignored.
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Hackers could go after medical devices next
Fortune
Nothing, it seems, is safe from hackers — not Yahoo's ad network, the federal government or even electronic skateboards. Another item to add to the list: medical devices. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Department of Homeland Security have both issued advisories warning hospitals not to use the Hospira infusion system Symbiq because of cyber vulnerabilities. No known attack has occurred, but by accessing a hospital's network, hackers could theoretically fiddle with the intravenous infusion pump.
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Targeted intraoperative imaging lights up lung cancer
MedPage Today
Optical fluorescent molecular real-time imaging during surgery can be used to differentiate lung adenocarcinomas from surrounding normal lung parenchyma, a pilot study now showed. In the study, 50 patients with a biopsy-proven lung adenocarcinoma received 0.1 mg/kg of FRalpha-targeted molecular contrast agent by intravenous infusion, four hours before surgery. During surgery, tumors were imaged in situ and ex vivo, after the lung parenchyma was dissected to directly expose the tumor to the imaging system, explained researchers.
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Medtronic recalls loading system for heart device
Reuters
Medtronic Plc has recalled 6,912 units of loading system of a recently approved heart device after reports of the presence of particulates. The medical device maker said it received 8 reports related to the issue out of 7,347 potentially affected units through July 6, but no reports of "adverse patient effects." The U.S. Food and Drug Administration classified the recall as "Class 1," implying there is a reasonable probability that the use of or exposure to the product could cause serious side-effects or death.
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New laser surgery ends 30 years of severe seizures
Medical Xpress
The seizures caused Nick Pauly to laugh mirthlessly, clap his hands and shout. At times, he would swear loudly. The seizures would come on without warning, caused by a tumor-like lesion that interfered with his hypothalamus. Medication could not control the seizures, and for the vast majority of his 30 years, there was no safe way to treat the lesion embedded in his brain. But last year, surgeons used new technology to deliver laser light directly into the lesion, destroying the problematic tissue without damaging the area around it. Pauly's most severe seizures have stopped.
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Experts: US needs to take immediate steps to fight super bugs
USA Today
The U.S. could save 37,000 lives over the next five years by taking immediate action to improve the way it fights healthcare-associated infections, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Infections with super bugs — bacteria that can't be killed even with standard antibiotics — cause more than 2 million illnesses and at least 23,000 deaths a year, according to the CDC. Super bugs often spread in the hospital, especially among patients with weakened immune systems.
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Robotic surgery feasible for inferior vena cava thrombectomy
HealthDay News
Completely intracorporeal robotic level III inferior vena cava tumor thrombectomy is feasible, according to a report published recently in The Journal of Urology. Researchers present the initial series of completely intracorporeal robotic level III inferior vena cava tumor thrombectomy cases. Nine and seven patients underwent robotic level III inferior vena cava thrombectomy and level II thrombectomy, respectively. The entire operation was performed robotically. An "inferior vena cava-first, kidney-last" robotic technique was developed to minimize the chances of intraoperative inferior vena cava thrombus embolization.
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The impact of health IT on workflow
By Scott Rupp
A new report by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality examines the enhanced understanding of the causal relationship between health information technology implementation and various ambulatory care workflow aspects. The report was conducted across six ambulatory care practices from across the United States, and reviewed health systems that had implemented different health IT products or systems.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    This brain surgeon simulator is not a game (OrthoSpineNews)
Wound closure more effective when surgeons listen to their preferred music (Medical News Today)
CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child (News-Medical)
CMS answers ICD-10 FAQs for healthcare providers (RevCycle Intelligence)
Cutting junior doctors' hours may not lower risk of surgical deaths (Reuters)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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