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3-D facial imaging camera could help customize surgery
Tech World
Researchers at Cardiff University and American firm 3dMD have developed a 3-D modelling system that collects 3-D data on a patient's face to gain a more detailed analysis than is possible by direct observation or video recordings. The technology converts pictures from three cameras into a moving 3-D model of a patient's head.
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AASPA NEWS

2013 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 3-6 at the Hilton Alexandria Old Town in Alexandria, Va., for our 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting in 2013.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 13th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Alexandria Old Town in the heart of historical Old Town Alexandria, Va.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!
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Register for the 2013 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two day course - 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the non-intensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Old Town Alexandria. Register today!
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MORE NEWS


New effort could dramatically improve surgical outcomes in children, say surgeons
News-Medical.net
A group of pediatric surgeons at hospitals around the country have designed a system to collect and analyze data on surgical outcomes in children - the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) is the first national database able to reliably compare outcomes among different hospitals where children's surgery is performed. The effort could dramatically improve surgical outcomes in children, say the initiative's leaders, who published their findings online Aug. 5, 2013 in the journal, Pediatrics.
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6-year-old has arm reattached after surgeons amputated it for cancer treatment
Medical Daily
Bethan Evan, a 6-year-old British girl who recently recovered from a rare form of bone and tissue cancer, knows what it's like to be in two places at once. The Daily Mail reports that in order to treat the young girl for the life-threatening disease, surgeons had to amputate her arm, treat it at a location three miles away, and then reattach it.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Single-port surgery for early gastric cancer appears safe, feasible
General Surgery News
Reduced-port laparoscopic distal gastrectomy to treat early gastric cancer is a feasible and safe procedure that provides improved cosmesis and fewer port-related complications, according to a study presented at the recent International Congress of the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) in Vienna, Austria.

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3-D printed splint for toddler's windpipe saves his life
Medical News Today
Researchers from the University of Illinois, the Institute of Genomic Biology (IGB), and the University of Michigan developed a 3-D printed splint, which was sewn around Kaiba's tracheotomy tube in order to expand his collapsed windpipe and provide support for tissue growth.

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Doctor performs 1st Google Glass-equipped surgery
PC Magazine
Dr. Rafael Grossmann, of the Eastern Maine Medical Center, recently performed his first Google surgery with Google Glass in tow. As far as we can tell, it's also the first such Google Glass-equipped surgery in the device's history — complete with a corresponding Google...

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New test allows surgeons to detect spread of breast cancer tumours immediately
The Independent
Thousands of breast cancer patients could be spared agonizing waits to find out whether they need follow-up surgery thanks to a new test that can detect whether a cancer has spread during the initial operation to remove a tumor. Currently patients have to wait for up to three weeks for tests from their initial surgery to confirm whether or not a cancer has spread, but the new test allows surgeons to detect spread in the operating theater itself and intervene immediately - removing the need for a second operation.
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Insurance premium expectations: 10 trends for surgeons to know about 2014
Becker's ASC Review
According to a Medscape report, there are 10 things surgeons should know about the coverage changes from the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act coming in the next few years.
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Horrific war injuries spawn radical plastic surgery techniques
Medical Xpress
Surgeons helped revolutionise plastic surgery and the treatment of facial trauma, working on soldiers, fighter pilots and civilians disfigured by bombs, shrapnel and burns. Gillies et al., did not work alone, but were supported by a vast surgical enterprise that included general surgeons, dentists, anaesthetists, artists and photographers, nurses and orderlies. "The First World War presented surgeons with a new challenge," says the author.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Novel 3-D simulation helps surgeons train more effectively (ScienceBlog)
Late outcomes best with carotid artery stenting followed by open-heart surgery (Healio)
Guidelines suggest a conservative approach, but painkillers, surgeries have increased as back pain treatments (Reuters via MedCity News)
Scientist build artificial ear using sheep and 3-D printer (The Daily Mail)
Medical mystery continues to stump doctors (By Jessica Taylor)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Blue Belt Technologies chases its goals in robotic surgical system business
Tribune Live
Inside the Strip District offices of Blue Belt Technologies Inc. hangs a checklist of milestones for the 9-year-old maker of robotic surgical systems. Many items have been checked off in the last year. Food and Drug Administration approval — December. First system sold — January. First human knee surgery — February. Remaining goals include expanding to hip surgeries and having a recently approved line of replacement knees implanted in a person.
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New antibiotic envelope helps prevent infection after pacemaker surgery
Fox News
When 57-year-old Michael Prince underwent a simple pacemaker procedure in January 2011, he never could have imagined how the next year of his life would play out. Prince was diagnosed with congestive heart failure after several bouts with pneumonia and a chronic cough landed him in the hospital.
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Robot treats brain clots with steerable needles
Medical Xpress
Surgery to relieve the damaging pressure caused by hemorrhaging in the brain is a perfect job for a robot. That is the basic premise of a new image-guided surgical system under development at Vanderbilt University. It employs steerable needles about the size of those used for biopsies to penetrate the brain with minimal damage and suction away the blood clot that has formed.
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AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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