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Register for the new Advanced Practice Providers: Administration, Leadership and Outcomes series
featuring one of AASPA's board members!

AASPA board member, Roy Constantine, Ph.D., PA-C, Faculty, will be speaking during one of the SCCM webcasts.

JOIN US and REGISTER NOW!

Developing Formal Orientation and Onboarding for Advanced Practice Providers
SAVE THE DATE: Sept. 30, 2014
11 a.m.- 12 p.m. Central Time
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AASPA NEWS

2014 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 23-26, 2014 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco, CA, for our 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 14th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Union Square in the heart of incredible San Francisco.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Click here to REGISTER NOW for best pricing!
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Register now for the 2014 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco.

Register today!
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MORE NEWS


Physician assistants more than double in a decade
Medscape (free login required)
The number of certified physician assistants (PAs) grew 219 percent from 2003 to 2013, almost 6 percent alone during the last year of that decade, according to the 2013 Statistical Profile of Certified Physician Assistants published online by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA). The number of certified PAs stood at 95,583 across the United States at the end of 2013, compared with 90,227 in 2012 and 43,500 in 2003. PAs practice in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, according to the NCCPA, the only certifying organization for PAs in the country.
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Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: Safe for children
Medscape (free login required)
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed in children is associated with short hospital stays, few complications, and good long-term results, the authors of a new study report. The prevalence of cholelithiasis is increasing with the rising incidence of obesity in children, although illnesses such as sickle-cell disease and other hematologic conditions remain the most common causes, lead author Moiz B. Zeidan, MBBS, from the Department of Surgery, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, and colleagues write in an article published in the June issue of Surgical Laparoscopy Endoscopy & Percutaneous Techniques.
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Physician stresses simulation to avert harm to real patients
General Surgery News
As a young combat pilot in the Israeli Air Force, Amitai Ziv practiced on a simulator for every nightmare scenario his trainers could come up with: ejecting from airplanes, landing planes overcome with flames, managing all sorts of equipment malfunctions. When he started medical school after leaving the air force, he was astonished that medical trainees honed their skills not on simulators, but on real patients.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Physician assistants more than double in a decade
Medscape (free login required)
The number of certified physician assistants (PAs) grew 219 percent from 2003 to 2013, almost 6 percent alone during the last year of that decade, according to the 2013 Statistical Profile of Certified Physician Assistants published online by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA).

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More than 200 teeth removed from teen with rare condition
KWTX-TV
Dental surgeons in Mumbai, India said they were surprised by the number of teeth they had to remove from the mouth of a teenage boy with a rare condition. In all the surgeons removed 232 teeth. The 17-year-old boy has odontoma, in which a tumor grows under a gum and creates smaller tooth-like growths called denticles.

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Patients remain in danger from preventable errors
FierceHealthcare
Patients today are no safer from harm caused by preventable errors than they were 15 years ago, a leading healthcare expert testified before the Senate Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging Thursday. In terms of error reduction and quality improvement, "[w]e have not moved the needle in any meaningful. demonstrable way overall," testified Ashish Jha, M.D., a professor at Harvard School of Public Health.

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Report: Surgeons get highest annual salary of $233,150 in US
NDTV
Surgeons get an average annual salary of $233,150 in the U.S., making surgery the highest paid career in the country, followed by physicians and psychiatrists, according to a report. A common requirement among the ten highest paying jobs in US is an extensive and specialized education and in some cases, it might stretch up to decades of preparation, according to a study by CareerCast.
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Where are my instruments and sterile supplies?
Infection Control Today
As sterile processing department (SPD) professionals, the questions often heard asked by surgeons, nurses and scrub techs are: “Where are my instruments?” or “Where are my supplies?” These two questions are usually asked when patients are already in the operating room (OR) suite prepped for a lifesaving procedure, when at this point any significant delay could result in infection or death. Occasionally the answer is “I don’t know,” which escalates the situation, resulting in high levels of anxiety for all parties involved. Unfortunately for SPD providers, during a busy day the answer is true, they simply do not know. When the search begins it can be hampered by numerous conversations and phone calls followed by panic for reasons which the OR has little understanding.
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US panel of surgeons says 'no' to noncompliant hernia patients
General Surgery News
Expert hernia surgeons are asking patients to adhere to strict preoperative regimens that include weight loss, smoking cessation and nutritional supplementation before surgery. If patients fail to comply, surgeons say they will not operate or will postpone surgery, contending that the risks for infection or failure are too high.
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3-D navigation for scoliosis correction screw placement: 5 findings
Becker's Spine Review
A study published in Spine Deformity — the journal of the Scoliosis Research Society — examines the effectiveness of preoperative three dimensional CT scans in adolescent scoliosis patients. The authors examined 62 patients with an average age of 15.1 years old. The average deformity was 76 degrees with a range of 52 degrees to 80 degrees. Average follow up was 35 months and 710 pedicle screws were placed.
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This sponge-like polymer could fix facial deformities
Wired
Millions of people suffer from facial deformities because an injury, surgery, or birth defect left a gap in their bone structure. These bone gaps are too wide for the body’s normal healing process to fix, and surgical solutions like grafts and putties usually fall short of restoring a person’s looks. But a new sponge-like polymer could provide a scaffold that lets bone cells regrow themselves. This “bone foam” is made out of a polycaprolactone, a polymer known as PCL that is already used in biomedical applications like sutures and barriers that keep healing tissues separate.
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Postoperative pain management in anorectal surgery
Pain Medicine News
Surveys from 1993, 2003 and 2012 have demonstrated that postsurgical pain is common and that a similar distribution of the quality of perceived pain has remained unchanged. Patient pain scores are now being used as metrics in measuring the adequacy of care. Surveys from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems during 2008 and 2009 confirmed the need for improving postoperative pain management.
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Drug-induced sleep apnea is a safe and effective means to bring about sleep quickly with few side-effects
Medical Xpress
Researchers from Penn Medicine have developed a safe and effective technique for inducing sleep in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea. The new procedure, known as drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE), uses progressive doses of anesthesia to pharmacologically induce sleep to the point of the obstruction-causing apnea in a short time frame without a dip in blood oxygen level and with few side effects.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Audit: Face-down positioning for macular hole repair unnecessary (Healio)
Patients seeking cheaper care are soliciting bids from doctors online (Kaiser Health News via The Washington Post)
Cataract surgery may cut cognitive decline in dementia (Medscape)
Contained morcellation for benign gynecologic surgeries feasible, minimize surgical risk (2 minute medicine)
Is this the next big leap for organ transplants? (The Boston Globe)

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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