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Register for the new Advanced Practice Providers: Administration, Leadership and Outcomes series
featuring one of AASPA's board members!

AASPA board member, Roy Constantine, Ph.D., PA-C, Faculty, will be speaking during one of the SCCM webcasts.

JOIN US and REGISTER NOW!

Developing Formal Orientation and Onboarding for Advanced Practice Providers
SAVE THE DATE: Sept. 30, 2014
11 a.m.- 12 p.m. Central Time
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AASPA NEWS

2014 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 23-26, 2014 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco, CA, for our 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 14th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Union Square in the heart of incredible San Francisco.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Click here to REGISTER NOW for best pricing!
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Register now for the 2014 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco.

Register today!
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MORE NEWS


Cutting the liver piece by piece
Health Canal
Instead of cutting open the abdomen, the surgeon makes four small holes. He can then use trocars, which are stiff tubes, to insert his instruments and a camera. One hole is for the video camera. Through the other holes, the surgeon can introduce a forceps, an instrument, a scalpel or other implements needed to cut the liver loose.
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New hydrogel drug delivery helps prevents transplant rejection
By Lynn Hetzler
Clinicians currently use systemic immunosuppression in vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA). While VCA can be a superior method of restoring the function and aesthetics of transplants, it can also cause significant side effects and negatively affect the quality of life for transplant patients. Scientists have now developed a means to administer immunosuppressant drugs locally. Furthermore, the researchers found a way to package the immunosuppressant drugs to release medication only when prompted by inflammation.
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Did a missing sponge cause this patient's death?
Medscape (free login required)
Along with towels, surgical sponges are left behind in patients more often than any other item. Surgeons use an average of 20 sponges per procedure, so their sheer number makes them difficult to track. Adding to the problem is that during surgical procedures, sponges absorb blood, causing them to blend into the background such that they seem to disappear.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Cutting the liver piece by piece
Health Canal
Instead of cutting open the abdomen, the surgeon makes four small holes. He can then use trocars, which are stiff tubes, to insert his instruments and a camera. One hole is for the video camera. Through the other holes, the surgeon can introduce a forceps, an instrument, a scalpel or other implements needed to cut the liver loose.

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read more
More than 200 teeth removed from teen with rare condition
KWTX-TV
Dental surgeons in Mumbai, India said they were surprised by the number of teeth they had to remove from the mouth of a teenage boy with a rare condition. In all the surgeons removed 232 teeth. The 17-year-old boy has odontoma, in which a tumor grows under a gum and creates smaller tooth-like growths called denticles.

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Patients remain in danger from preventable errors
FierceHealthcare
Patients today are no safer from harm caused by preventable errors than they were 15 years ago, a leading healthcare expert testified before the Senate Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging Thursday. In terms of error reduction and quality improvement, "[w]e have not moved the needle in any meaningful. demonstrable way overall," testified Ashish Jha, M.D., a professor at Harvard School of Public Health.

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Improving safety and predictability of complex musculoskeletal surgery
Medical Xpress
As the average lifespan increases, the percentage of aged individuals in populations across developed countries is also growing. This means healthcare systems are presented with a higher incidence of complex musculoskeletal pathologies, such as joint deformation and misalignment or bone and soft-tissue cancer, thus the demand for reconstructive orthopaedic operations is correspondingly rising.
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Breast cancer imaging surgery world-first
Health Canal
Two imaging devices, developed by Lightpoint Medical, are being tested to see if they will help surgeons remove breast tumours and cancerous lymph nodes without unnecessarily cutting out healthy tissue. “We hope this is a major development in cancer surgery – we’re taking two steps forward, not just one,” says Professor Arnie Purushotham, a surgeon and cancer researcher at Guy’s and St Thomas’ and King’s College London, who is leading the study.
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Cosmetic eye procedure may ease migraines, small study says
HealthDay News
Cosmetic eyelid surgery involving specific nerves may do more than improve your looks — the procedure may also provide migraine relief for some, according to new research. The technique involves making incisions in the upper eyelid to deactivate so-called "trigger" nerves. This process also lifts the lid, a technique known as blepharoplasty.
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Stem cell treatment presents challenges in neurology
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
In most neurologic conditions, injury to neural cells is followed by an immune response to the damage and consequential neurodegeneration. However, due to different genetic backgrounds, the disease manifestation could be different in each individual. Therefore, it would be ideal to design individualized therapy for each patient suffering the relevant signs and symptoms. Repairing the central nervous system (CNS) and the reconstruction of the damaged neural network require the removal of etiological factors in the first place, followed by inflammatory response modulation, protection of neural cells from degeneration, and rebuilding the network connections.
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Performing surgery with the brain inside an MR machine
Medical Xpress
As brain surgeons test new procedures and drugs to treat conditions ranging from psychiatric disorders to brain cancer, accuracy is becoming an ever-greater issue. In treating the brain, the state of the art today starts with images from a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, usually made a few days before surgery. Then, in the operating room, multiple cameras track instruments as they are inserted through a hole in the skull, creating images that can be superimposed on the original MR scans.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Audit: Face-down positioning for macular hole repair unnecessary (Healio)
Patients seeking cheaper care are soliciting bids from doctors online (Kaiser Health News via The Washington Post)
Cataract surgery may cut cognitive decline in dementia (Medscape)
Contained morcellation for benign gynecologic surgeries feasible, minimize surgical risk (2 minute medicine)
Is this the next big leap for organ transplants? (The Boston Globe)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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