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A new tool lets brain surgeons see what they're doing
Bloomberg Businessweek
Doing almost anything with your eyes closed is usually pretty hard. Now consider that until recently neurosurgeons performed operations without being able to see their patients’ brains. Most still do, but now a Memphis-based company called MRI Interventions (MRIC) is working to end the "poke and hope" practice. Its technology, ClearPoint, provides real-time brain imaging and step-by-step guidance and is already in use in 21 U.S. hospitals, including the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.
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Minor incision equals major advance
CNW
Surgeons at London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC) have made Canadian history by performing the first living-donor kidney removal for transplant purposes, using a single incision point. The robotic assisted single-site nephrectomy was performed recently by LHSC surgeons Dr. Patrick Luke and Dr. Alp Sener on kidney donor Kelley Kunkel of Walkerton, ON. The surgeons performed the procedure using the da Vinci robotic surgical system which allowed them to carefully extract the healthy kidney.
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AASPA NEWS

2013 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 3-6 at the Hilton Alexandria Old Town in Alexandria, Va., for our 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting in 2013.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 13th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Alexandria Old Town in the heart of historical Old Town Alexandria, Va.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!
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Register for the 2013 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two day course - 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the non-intensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Old Town Alexandria. Register today!
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MORE NEWS


Recovering after hydrocephalus surgery
CNN
Soon after Roona Begum was born in a remote village in northeastern India, Begum was diagnosed with an extreme form of hydrocephalus — a disorder causing cerebral fluid to build up in the brain. After five surgeries, Begum's head is now down to a circumference of 58 centimeters, still larger than the average 38 to 48 centimeters, but small enough to allow her to live a reasonably normal life.
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Healthcare execs call for action on climate change
Fierce Healthcare
The healthcare industry must take action against climate change, "a health issue that will affect everyone in the world," according to Healthcare Without Harm President Gary Cohen and Gundersen Health System CEO Jeffrey Thompson in an editorial for LiveScience. Cohen and Thompson cite the spread of mosquito-borne diseases such as Dengue fever to new regions and the increase in respiratory problems...

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3-D printed splint for toddler's windpipe saves his life
Medical News Today
Researchers from the University of Illinois, the Institute of Genomic Biology (IGB), and the University of Michigan developed a 3-D printed splint, which was sewn around Kaiba's tracheotomy tube in order to expand his collapsed windpipe and provide support for tissue growth.

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Doctor performs 1st Google Glass-equipped surgery
PC Magazine
Dr. Rafael Grossmann, of the Eastern Maine Medical Center, recently performed his first Google surgery with Google Glass in tow. As far as we can tell, it's also the first such Google Glass-equipped surgery in the device's history — complete with a corresponding Google...

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Noninvasive cancer vs. breast lesion. Which label leads to more surgeries?
Reuters via MedCity News
How doctors describe a noninvasive type of breast lesion may affect how women choose to have the abnormal cells treated, a new survey suggests. Ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS, accounts for about one in every five new breast cancer diagnoses in the United States when it's included in cancer statistics.
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System lets surgeons image the brain while they operate on it
MIT Technology Review
A new system for visualizing the brain during surgery is helping neurosurgeons more accurately diagnose and treat patients and is even allowing them to perform some procedures that until now have been extremely difficult or even impossible. Neurosurgeons can use the imaging technology during surgeries that require small objects — biopsy needles, implants, or tubes to deliver drugs — to be placed at precise locations in the brain.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Irregularities in air quality promote surgical infections (Medscape)
Morbidly obese 2-year-old world's youngest to have bariatric surgery (Fox News)
Surgeons must balance research and medical training with outstanding patient care (News-Medical.net)
Study: Surgical readmission rates reflect initial care (U.S. News & World Report via HealthDay News)
Will spine surgeons need non-surgical partners in the future? 6 things to know (Becker's Spine Review)
Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


New device helps surgeons spare healthy brain tissue
KVUE-TV
Brain tumors have always posed a challenge for neurosurgeons. They can reach tumors deep within the brain, but it's still difficult without damaging surrounding tissue. Now a new device called the Nico Brain Path provides minimally invasive surgery for patients who may have thought they were out of treatment options.
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Private healthcare services more expensive for patients due to lack of competition
Out-Law.com
In a report detailing its provisional findings from its review of the privately funded healthcare market, the Competition Commission said that it had concerns about aspects of the "supply and acquisition of privately funded healthcare services". Those features, either in isolation or in combination, "prevent, restrict or distort competition such that there are adverse effects on competition", it said.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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