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Register for the new Advanced Practice Providers: Administration, Leadership and Outcomes series
featuring one of AASPA's board members!

AASPA board member, Roy Constantine, Ph.D., PA-C, Faculty, will be speaking during one of the SCCM webcasts.

JOIN US and REGISTER NOW!

Developing Formal Orientation and Onboarding for Advanced Practice Providers
SAVE THE DATE: Sept. 30, 2014
11 a.m.- 12 p.m. Central Time
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AASPA NEWS

2014 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
AASPA ROOM BLOCK RATE EXPIRES IN 10 DAYS!!!
Don’t wait!!! Register through the AASPA website.
Outside our block rates are at well over $375/night!!!


We hope you will join us Oct. 23-26, 2014 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco, CA, for our 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 14th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Union Square in the heart of incredible San Francisco.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Click here to REGISTER NOW for best pricing!
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Register now for the 2014 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco.

Register today!
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MORE NEWS


Orthopedic surgeons are seeing teens with adult injuries
KVUE-TV
If you think today's middle school and high school athletes are bigger faster and stronger than we were back in the day, you're correct. Orthopedic specialists also say it's why they're seeing more severe, adult-type injuries in kids. High school football in Texas produces plenty of hard hits, and more teens are suffering sports injuries more common in adults.
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10 technologies changing the future of healthcare
TechRepublic
The healthcare industry will see a 21 percent increase in IT jobs by 2020, according to research by the University of Chicago. Across all healthcare sectors, there is a demand for creative, thoughtful uses of health informatics, mobile technology, cloud systems and digital diagnostics. From digital networks to wearables, the healthcare industry is undergoing massive technological changes. Many of these new inventions have yet to be approved by the FDA, a process that can take up to 10 years. But that's not stopping the research and development of new technologies. Here are 10 types of tech that are changing the course of healthcare.
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PARS technique enables surgeons to better repair torn Achilles tendon
News-Medical
In most surgeries, damaged tissue is cleaned out before surgeons make the necessary repairs. However, a new minimally-invasive surgery to repair a torn Achilles tendon actually uses the damaged tissue to help repair the tear. The percutaneous Achilles repair system, or PARS technique, enables surgeons to better repair a torn Achilles tendon through a smaller incision. This procedure was recently performed at Houston Methodist Hospital to treat an NFL cornerback, getting him back on field for this season.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Facial plastic surgery can safely address the major aspects of aging in one operation
Medical Xpress
A total facial rejuvenation that combines three procedures to address the multiple signs of an aging face and neck can be performed safely at one time, a new study shows. Total facial rejuvenation, which combines an extensive facelift to tighten skin and muscle; specialized...

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Do experienced surgeons have better outcomes with scoliosis surgery?
Becker's Spine Review
An article recently published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery examined whether surgeon experience had an impact on outcomes for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis correction. The researchers examined posterior-only surgical procedures for AIS from 2007 to 2008 and followed patients for a minimum of two years.

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Patients remain in danger from preventable errors
FierceHealthcare
Patients today are no safer from harm caused by preventable errors than they were 15 years ago, a leading healthcare expert testified before the Senate Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging Thursday. In terms of error reduction and quality improvement, "[w]e have not moved the needle in any meaningful. demonstrable way overall," testified Ashish Jha, M.D., a professor at Harvard School of Public Health.

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Surgery as a means to weight loss is anything but an easy way out
The Globe and Mail
Given the alarming worldwide rise in severe obesity, it is not surprising that there is an increasing demand for bariatric surgery. As a non-surgeon, I have always preferred to steer my patients to non-surgical solutions, wherever possible. Unfortunately, when it comes to obesity that significantly affects your health and quality of life, non-surgical solutions are rarely effective in the long term.
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Hospitals increasingly robotic surgical systems
AZCentral
A growing number of hospitals are buying robotic surgical systems or purchasing newer models. General surgeons Conrad Ballecer and Brian Prebil, who are on staff at Abrazo Health's Arrowhead Hospital, explain how the surgery is still performed by a human being, even though use of the robot makes it possible to conduct minimally invasive surgery.
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Facial plastic surgery can safely address the major aspects of aging in one operation
Medical Xpress
A total facial rejuvenation that combines three procedures to address the multiple signs of an aging face and neck can be performed safely at one time, a new study shows. Total facial rejuvenation, which combines an extensive facelift to tighten skin and muscle; specialized, midface implants to restore fullness; and laser resurfacing to reduce skin's irregular texture and discoloration, can be safely performed at one time, reports Dr. Achih H. Chen, facial plastic surgeon.
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New treatment leaves skin cancer patients cancer free without surgery
KTRK-TV
For skin cancer patients, there's a new non-invasive answer that can leave them cancer free with no surgery in as little as 12 minutes. While there are no needles, cutting, or pain, the new radiation treatment is a viable option for millions of Americans. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. Nearly 3.5 million non-melanoma cases are diagnosed in the United States annually.
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Networking on the job
Advance for NPs & PAs
You already have a job, like it, and plan to stay put for a while. No need to network, right? Oh so wrong! Letting your networking effort lapse is a major mistake. Building a network while on-the-job is smart, strategic and effective. "Networking should always be ongoing," advised Kelly Mattice, vice president of health services at The Execu/Search Group in New York City. "You may already have a job, but then what do you do? How do you advance, shine, stand out? Healthcare is a very competitive market," she said. "You are always competing for a job — sometimes to remain in the job you already have, the connections you make can keep your career moving forward."
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Study explores safety of breast cancer surgery in women aged 80 years and above
News-Medical
A study conducted by National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) has shown that age per se is not a contraindication to breast cancer surgery, and such surgeries may be safely performed for women aged 80 years and above. Led by Dr. Ong Kong Wee, Senior Consultant in the Division of Surgical Oncology, the team consists of Dr. Veronique Tan, Consultant, and Dr. Lee Chee Meng, Resident Doctor. The study explores the safety of breast cancer surgery in women aged 80 years and above.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Surgeons use boy's rib to repair his esophagus after he swallowed remote control battery (Medical Daily)
From nose to knee: Engineered cartilage regenerates joints (Health Canal)
Do experienced surgeons have better outcomes with scoliosis surgery? (Becker's Spine Review)
How do surgeons approach enhancements in refractive surgery patients? (Healio)
Carving the fat from patient surgical care (Healthcare Professionals Network)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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