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Study links herbal supplement use prior to surgery with postoperative complications
News-Medical.net
Patients electing cosmetic facial procedures such as rhinoplasty at St. Louis Cosmetic Surgery may be less likely to suffer complications, thanks to the way doctors at the practice have responded to a new study. The study, performed by researchers Case Western Reserve University and published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, links herbal supplement use prior to surgery with postoperative complications.
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Fitbit can track recovery from heart surgery
TIME
Wireless activity trackers may do more than log how many steps you take. Doctors are turning to them to understand which factors help patients recover faster from surgery. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota equipped nearly 150 heart-surgery patients over age 50 with Fitbit activity trackers on their ankles on the first day of their recovery.
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AASPA NEWS

2013 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 3-6 at the Hilton Alexandria Old Town in Alexandria, Va., for our 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting in 2013.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 13th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Alexandria Old Town in the heart of historical Old Town Alexandria, Va.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!
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Register for the 2013 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two day course - 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the non-intensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Old Town Alexandria. Register today!
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Neck surgery suggested as cure for blood pressure
Hartlepool Mail
"Blood pressure lowered by nerve surgery," reports The Daily Telegraph based on the results of a study in rats. Although similar surgery has been performed to treat shortness of breath, we will have to wait for the results of clinical trials before we know whether the operation lowers blood pressure in people. Researchers investigated how interrupting nerve signals to the carotid body...

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iPad app helps surgeons in the operating room, gives digital overlays of key blood vessels
MedCity News
As augmented reality technology improves, you're going to see it in use everywhere — including the operating room. German research institute Fraunhofer MEVIS has created an app that lets surgeons use the iPad as a...

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Surgeons develop app to practice surgery
BBC News
Trainee surgeons are using tablet computers as a way to practise surgery outside the operating theatre. The surgery app was designed by four surgeons in London and can be downloaded on a variety of devices. Dr Advait Gandhe, one of its developers said they wanted to take surgical education to "another level". The app has been downloaded worldwide more than 80,000 times in less than six months.

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MORE NEWS


Is the healthcare market competitive?
By Mike Wokasch
Consumers benefit from competition that provides incentives for continuous product improvements and encourages a higher level of service performance. More importantly, competition can help keep prices in check. Competitive markets exist when consumers have multiple purchasing options and choices with transparent pricing. The healthcare market has constrained competition, providing a platform for mediocre quality of care and unsustainable, rising healthcare costs.
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Debate over cost, impact of new healthcare exchanges
WITI-TV
Gov. Scott Walker’s administration says health insurance costs could skyrocket when the Affordable Care Act takes effect. But consumer advocates and Democrats say the governor is "cooking the books" to make a political point. American healthcare is about to undergo the biggest change in a generation. On October 1, the Affordable Care Act insurance exchanges will open online. The exchanges will offer private health plans to families and individuals who aren’t covered by an employer.
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Study shows that people who undergo cataract surgery to correct visual impairment live longer
Medical Xpress
People with cataract-related vision loss who have had cataract surgery to improve their sight are living longer than those with visual impairment who chose not to have the procedure, according to an Australian cohort study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. After comparing the two groups, the researchers found a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk in those who had the surgery.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Irregularities in air quality promote surgical infections (Medscape)
Morbidly obese 2-year-old world's youngest to have bariatric surgery (Fox News)
Surgeons must balance research and medical training with outstanding patient care (News-Medical.net)
Study: Surgical readmission rates reflect initial care (U.S. News & World Report via HealthDay News)
Will spine surgeons need non-surgical partners in the future? 6 things to know (Becker's Spine Review)
Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


MRI right before or after surgery does not benefit women with early breast cancer
Medical Xpress
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center study shows that the use of MRI before or immediately after surgery in women with DCIS was not associated with reduced local recurrence or contralateral breast cancer rates. While no clinical practice guidelines exist for the use of MRI around the time of surgery, some surgeons use the screening tool to obtain a clearer picture of the cancer before surgery is performed or immediately after surgery to check for any residual disease.
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Smarter development of healthcare tech needed to curb costs, deliver care more effectively
MedCity News
In every industry but one, technology makes things better and cheaper. Why is it that innovation increases the cost of healthcare? As an economist who studies healthcare, I find it hard to know whether to welcome or fear new technology. Surgeons can replace a heart valve with a plastic and metal one that unfolds once threaded through arteries — repairs that used to be made by cracking open the chest.
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Robotic surgery is growing, but complications might be underreported
Gigaom
Robots can make better surgeons than humans, especially when it comes to accessing hard-to-reach parts of the body and minimizing trauma. But like any machine, they can malfunction. A recent study by John Hopkins University researchers found that robot surgeons likely malfunction more than previously thought, raising questions about reporting systems.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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