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Register for the new Advanced Practice Providers: Administration, Leadership and Outcomes series
featuring one of AASPA's board members!

AASPA board member, Roy Constantine, Ph.D., PA-C, Faculty, will be speaking during one of the SCCM webcasts.

JOIN US and REGISTER NOW!

Developing Formal Orientation and Onboarding for Advanced Practice Providers
SAVE THE DATE: Sept. 30, 2014
11 a.m.- 12 p.m. Central Time
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AASPA NEWS

2014 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
AASPA ROOM BLOCK RATE EXPIRES IN 10 DAYS!!!
Don’t wait!!! Register through the AASPA website.
Outside our block rates are at well over $375/night!!!


We hope you will join us Oct. 23-26, 2014 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco, CA, for our 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 14th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Union Square in the heart of incredible San Francisco.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Click here to REGISTER NOW for best pricing!
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Register now for the 2014 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco.

Register today!
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
What is the future of limb transplant surgery?
By Alan Kelsky
The ethics of transplanting life-saving organs such as the heart, lungs and liver from people who died in a trauma accident is well established. So are the life-saving gifts of a kidney or part of a liver from live donors. Without these extraordinary medical advances people die.

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Facial plastic surgery can safely address the major aspects of aging in one operation
Medical Xpress
A total facial rejuvenation that combines three procedures to address the multiple signs of an aging face and neck can be performed safely at one time, a new study shows. Total facial rejuvenation, which combines an extensive facelift to tighten skin and muscle; specialized...

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Do experienced surgeons have better outcomes with scoliosis surgery?
Becker's Spine Review
An article recently published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery examined whether surgeon experience had an impact on outcomes for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis correction. The researchers examined posterior-only surgical procedures for AIS from 2007 to 2008 and followed patients for a minimum of two years.

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MORE NEWS


Small study finds off-pump surgery reduces cabg pain
Anesthesiology News
Given the proposed association between inflammation and chronic persistent pain, off-pump surgery may hold certain benefits for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). This hypothesis seems to have been borne out in an unpublished pilot study by a Japanese research team, which concluded that postoperative chest and forearm pain were significantly greater in patients undergoing on-pump surgery than their off-pump counterparts.
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The growing role of remote live surgery
Healthcare Technology
There is a global shortage of surgeons around the world, but according to the World Journal of Surgery, the workforce is in crisis in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Conditions that can be treated elsewhere because of the available workforce, in many instances results in patients losing their lives.
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Solidarity vs. solitary: Why collaboration means better healthcare
By Karen R. Thomas
Historically, healthcare has been adept at achieving highly focused and specialized solutions. Focus and specialization literally permeated the culture and structure of healthcare for many years. However, some critics consider the segmented way that healthcare establishments have operated in the past far too solitary for today's wider and more inclusive care goals. Collaboration within the healthcare community used to be an often-discussed but seldom-practiced idea.
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Parents choose less expensive surgery when given privy information upfront
Medical News Today
Consumer price comparison is almost nonexistent in the U.S. health care system, but a new study shows that when given the choice between a less costly "open" operation or a pricier laparoscopy for their children's appendicitis, parents were almost twice as likely to choose the less expensive procedure - when they were aware of the cost difference. The study, published in the September issue of Annals of Surgery online, shows that providing pricing information upfront can influence patient choice of surgical procedures and potentially lead to cost savings in health care, a sector of the economy that accounts for more than 17 percent of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product, says Eric R. Scaife, M.D., senior author, associate professor of surgery and chief of pediatric surgery at the University of Utah (U of U) School of Medicine.
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What is the future of limb transplant surgery?
By Alan Kelsky
The ethics of transplanting life-saving organs such as the heart, lungs and liver from people who died in a trauma accident is well established. So are the life-saving gifts of a kidney or part of a liver from live donors. Without these extraordinary medical advances people die. But how do you feel about the harvesting of limbs, hands and feet for those who lost theirs in war, from accidents or illness? Most do well with prosthetics, and prosthetics are advancing to perform more like original body parts.
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Engaging patients in healthcare aids outcomes, cuts costs
MedPage Today
Patient engagement can improve health outcomes and reduce costs, according to an article published online in the journal Health Affairs. "With the right support, people can not only help themselves but also each other," Susan Edgman-Levitan, PA, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and a co-author of the article, said at a briefing here Monday sponsored by the journal. "In my experience, patients are incredibly effective at helping us figure out what to get rid of in the way that we design care."
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3-D-printed replica brains used to guide life-changing pediatric surgery
Product Design Engineering News
It seems the applications for 3-D printing are endless. Now, to add to the ever-growing collection of awesome 3-D-printed goodies, medics have used the famous additive manufacturing technology to produce replicas of infants’ brains in order to practice life-saving but risky surgical procedures. At just 5 months old, he started experiencing violent epileptic seizures that were having a detrimental effect on his brain.
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Coronary angioplasty safe and effective at facilities without on-site cardiothoracic surgery
2 minute medicine
Rates of procedural complications, one-year mortality, and myocardial infarction were equivalent between individuals undergoing coronary angioplasty at facilities with and without on-site cardiothoracic surgery. Patients undergoing coronary angioplasty at facilities without on-site cardiothoracic surgery were at a higher risk for subsequent unplanned revascularization within one year of.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Orthopedic surgeons are seeing teens with adult injuries (KVUE-TV)
Surgery as a means to weight loss is anything but an easy way out (The Globe and Mail)
Facial plastic surgery can safely address the major aspects of aging in one operation (Medical Xpress)
PARS technique enables surgeons to better repair torn Achilles tendon (News-Medical)
10 technologies changing the future of healthcare (TechRepublic)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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