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Register for the new Advanced Practice Providers: Administration, Leadership and Outcomes series
featuring one of AASPA's board members!

AASPA board member, Roy Constantine, Ph.D., PA-C, Faculty, will be speaking during one of the SCCM webcasts.

JOIN US and REGISTER NOW!

Developing Formal Orientation and Onboarding for Advanced Practice Providers
SAVE THE DATE: Sept. 30, 2014
11 a.m.- 12 p.m. Central Time
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AASPA NEWS

2014 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
AASPA ROOM BLOCK RATE EXPIRES IN 10 DAYS!!!
Don’t wait!!! Register through the AASPA website.
Outside our block rates are at well over $375/night!!!


We hope you will join us Oct. 23-26, 2014 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco, CA, for our 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 14th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Union Square in the heart of incredible San Francisco.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Click here to REGISTER NOW for best pricing!
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Register now for the 2014 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco.

Register today!
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
How 3-D printing improves surgical outcomes
By Renee Eaton
Recently, an acquaintance underwent what was expected to be a routine ablation procedure — nearly 10 hours later, the surgery finally finished. Despite CT scans, X-rays and EKGs, the surgeons encountered "structural issues" that complicated the operation. If they'd had a 3-D print of his heart, they might have anticipated and planned contingencies based on what they saw.

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What is the future of limb transplant surgery?
By Alan Kelsky
The ethics of transplanting life-saving organs such as the heart, lungs and liver from people who died in a trauma accident is well established. So are the life-saving gifts of a kidney or part of a liver from live donors. Without these extraordinary medical advances people die.

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3-D-printed replica brains used to guide life-changing pediatric surgery
Product Design Engineering News
It seems the applications for 3-D printing are endless. Now, to add to the ever-growing collection of awesome 3-D-printed goodies, medics have used the famous additive manufacturing technology to produce replicas of infants’ brains in order to practice life-saving but risky surgical procedures.

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MORE NEWS


Surgical training can be fun and games
MedPage Today
Make simulation training like a game and surgical residents will want to play, researchers reported in a letter in JAMA Surgery. Perhaps unsurprisingly: It works even better if it's competitive and gives prizes. Using game mechanics may lead to better technical skills and increase cost-effectiveness of simulation training, wrote Dr. B. Price Kerfoot, EdM, a urologist at the VA Boston Healthcare System and Dr. Nicole Kissane, EdM, a general surgeon at Boston Medical Center.
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Study: Age, medications play role in post-transplant cancer rate
By Karen Zabel
Organ transplant recipients regularly receive immunosuppressive drugs to help minimize the risk of rejection, but those drugs come with significant risks of their own, including leaving patients open to predatory infections and even certain types of cancer. Now, a new study suggests the type of immunosuppressant drug used as well as other factors may help predict those risks and possibly reduce them. The study was presented at the 2014 World Transplant Congress in San Francisco.
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10 key trends in the orthopedic power tools market — will robotics make it?
Becker's Spine Review
MarketOptimizer released a new report on the orthopedic power tools market, with some question as to whether robotic technologies and computer assistance will make a big enough impact to stick around. "Although the surgical protocol of robotic-assisted procedures is well-established, the technology has been slow to gain acceptance," said a company analyst. "As with computer-assisted devices, the lingering issue is the cost of robotic systems, as orthopedic surgeons often question whether the clinical benefits offered by the equipment can outweigh the extra expenditure."
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Surgery may yield better long-term results for some lung cancer patients
Medical News Today
Patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer who are otherwise healthy fare better over time if they undergo conventional surgery versus less-invasive radiosurgery to remove their cancer, according to a Yale study. The findings are scheduled to be presented at the 56th annual conference of the American Society for Radiation Oncology in San Francisco.
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How 3-D printing improves surgical outcomes
By Renee Eaton
Recently, an acquaintance underwent what was expected to be a routine ablation procedure — nearly 10 hours later, the surgery finally finished. Despite CT scans, X-rays and EKGs, the surgeons encountered "structural issues" that complicated the operation. If they'd had a 3-D print of his heart, they might have anticipated and planned contingencies based on what they saw. For this reason, more surgeons have begun using patient-specific models to plan surgeries. This enables surgeons to reduce the time spent in the operating room — and more importantly — increases the surgeon's accuracy.
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Surgical sleep solutions cures sleep apnea sufferers
KULR-TV
According to the National Sleep Foundation, about 18 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea. One Missoula, Montana, doctor and his team hope to change that with a new way to breathe easy. "Sleep apnea is an obstruction of the airway during sleep, and the individual would stop breathing for variable periods of time," said Dr. Clark Taylor, director of Surgical Arts Centre.
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Study: Ovarian cancer fears prompt unnecessary surgeries
The Houston Chronicle
More women are finding out they have small ovarian tumors because of an increased use of medical imaging. But a new Kaiser Permanente study has found very few of those masses turn out to be cancerous, suggesting that many surgeries to remove tumors may be unnecessary. The fear of ovarian cancer drives many patients and their doctors into immediate surgery when it might be advisable to wait several weeks or a few months to see if the mass shrinks or goes away on its own, Kaiser researchers said.
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Stanford Study: Google Glass makes doctors better surgeons
VentureBeat
One of the ripest markets for Google Glass and Glass-based apps may be healthcare. While patient care has become increasingly data-driven, doctors need a way to receive the data while remaining hands-on with patients. Can wearables in the OR improve clinical outcomes? Although it makes sense, there's little empirical evidence for or against wearables. But a new study may help answer that question.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What is the future of limb transplant surgery? (By Alan Kelsky)
Parents choose less expensive surgery when given privy information upfront (Medical News Today)
The growing role of remote live surgery (Healthcare Technology)
Coronary angioplasty safe and effective at facilities without on-site cardiothoracic surgery (2 minute medicine)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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