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Irregularities in air quality promote surgical infections
Medscape
Air flow in operating rooms could be a risk factor for surgical-site infections, a new study has found. The problem appears to be in the differential pressure between air supply and exhaust. There is a strong association between risk for surgical-site infection and a variation in differential pressure of more than 100 cubic feet per minute during a procedure, warn researchers.
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Surgeons must balance research and medical training with outstanding patient care
News-Medical.net
Like a juggler keeping multiple plates in the air, a surgeon in academic medicine must balance research and medical training with outstanding patient care. Charles Bellows, M.D., FACS, relishes the challenge. Dr. Bellows, a University of New Mexico Professor of General Surgery, recently assumed the role of Chief of the Division of General Surgery in the Department of Surgery at the UNM School of Medicine.
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AASPA NEWS

2013 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 3-6 at the Hilton Alexandria Old Town in Alexandria, Va., for our 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting in 2013.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 13th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Alexandria Old Town in the heart of historical Old Town Alexandria, Va.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!
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Register for the 2013 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two day course - 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the non-intensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 13th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Old Town Alexandria. Register today!
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FEATURED ARTICLE
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Nerve blocks prevent pain after major surgery
Pain Medicine News
Administration of local or regional anesthesia before some major surgeries can prevent long-term pain for patients at five to six months postoperatively, according to a recent meta-analysis. "A large percentage of people have pain at six months, especially after thoracotomy, breast cancer surgery and cesarean section," said Dr. Michael H. Andreae.

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iPad app helps surgeons in the operating room, gives digital overlays of key blood vessels
MedCity News
As augmented reality technology improves, you're going to see it in use everywhere — including the operating room. German research institute Fraunhofer MEVIS has created an app that lets surgeons use the iPad as a...

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Surgeons develop app to practice surgery
BBC News
Trainee surgeons are using tablet computers as a way to practise surgery outside the operating theatre. The surgery app was designed by four surgeons in London and can be downloaded on a variety of devices. Dr Advait Gandhe, one of its developers said they wanted to take surgical education to "another level". The app has been downloaded worldwide more than 80,000 times in less than six months.

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Braces help avoid surgery in teens with scoliosis
Fox News
In the first large-scale test of whether wearing a brace helps to prevent an already-curved childhood spine from twisting further, bracing was nearly twice as effective as a watch-and-wait approach at preventing kids from needing corrective surgery. But the study also found that too many children with scoliosis are being given a brace when they don't need one.
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Study: Surgical readmission rates reflect initial care
U.S. News & World Report via HealthDay News
Quality of surgical care is directly related to the likelihood of hospital readmission for additional surgery, according to researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health. Their study, involving nearly 5,000 patients discharged after major surgery, shows that improving initial surgical care will reduce readmission rates and costs.
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New device offers less invasive treatment for enlarged prostate
Healthline News
A new medical device offers a less invasive way to treat symptoms caused by an enlarged prostate. This walnut-sized gland in men sits below the bladder and surrounds the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body.
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Morbidly obese 2-year-old world's youngest to have bariatric surgery
Fox News
A morbidly obese two-year-old has become the youngest person in the world to undergo bariatric surgery. The parents of the toddler from Saudi Arabia who weighed (73 pounds) and had a Body Mass Index of 41 sought help because he suffered sleep apnea that caused him to stop breathing while asleep.
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FDA approval for endovascular repair of aortic dissection
Today's Medical Developments
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Conformable GORE TAG Thoracic Endoprosthesis for endovascular repair of acute and chronic Type B dissections of the descending thoracic aorta. This durable endoprosthesis is the only device to receive FDA approval for this indication. The Conformable GORE TAG Thoracic Endoprosthesis is designed for multiple thoracic etiologies. Extensive clinical research has been conducted with the device and it is the one and only device to receive FDA indications for aneurysm, trauma, and dissection.
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Will spine surgeons need non-surgical partners in the future? 6 things to know
Becker's Spine Review
Spine surgeons and non-surgical spine and back pain specialists traditionally worked in silos, their care reflected through the lens of whichever physician they saw first. In some communities, surgeons and non-surgical specialists have competitive relationships and studies with varying responses fill the literature comparing surgical to non-surgical approaches for different conditions and indications.
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Statin use tied to cataract development
Fox News
The risk of developing cloudy lenses in the eyes may be linked to the use of cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins, according to a new study. While the researchers can't prove the drugs caused the eye condition, they found that people who took statins — such as Zocor and Lipitor — were about 27 percent more likely to develop cataracts, compared to people who didn't take the medication.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Irregularities in air quality promote surgical infections (Medscape)
Morbidly obese 2-year-old world's youngest to have bariatric surgery (Fox News)
Surgeons must balance research and medical training with outstanding patient care (News-Medical.net)
Study: Surgical readmission rates reflect initial care (U.S. News & World Report via HealthDay News)
Will spine surgeons need non-surgical partners in the future? 6 things to know (Becker's Spine Review)
Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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