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Broken bones could be mended with robot-assisted surgery
Health Canal
Broken bones that involve joints cause considerable disability and substantial NHS costs. To work properly and avoid painful arthritis, the pieces of the joint must be put back together perfectly. Surgeons do this by making a large incision to open up the area around the joint and see the broken bits. These wounds cause pain, scarring and infection risk and long hospital stays. To avoid these problems, minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is sometimes used, where joint pieces are manipulated indirectly through tiny wounds.
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Preoperative blood typing may not be needed for some pediatric surgeries
RedOrbit
Certain pediatric surgeries carry such low risk of serious blood loss that clinicians can safely forgo expensive blood typing and blood stocking before such procedures, suggest the results of a small study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. The finding, published ahead of print in the journal Pediatric Anesthesia, was accompanied by a list of 10 operations with "zero" transfusion risk, according to the investigators who reviewed the records of thousands of pediatric surgeries performed at The Johns Hopkins Hospital over 13 months.
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New eyelid surgery: Instead of stitches, why not glue your way to more open eyes?
Medical Daily
An increasingly popular "facial rejuvenation" procedure especially among older and Asian women, eyelid surgery has recently been updated. Instead of closing the wounds with surgical stitches, one doctor has begun to use fibrin glue, which he believes improves healing time.
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Reason for seeking treatment influences preoperative expectations of arthroscopic shoulder surgery
Healio
Researchers from the Steadman Philippon Research Institute analyzed patient expectations before arthroscopic shoulder surgery and found that while the main expectation of all patients was return to sport, secondary expectations varied in importance depending on the reason why patients sought treatment.

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iPad app helps surgeons in the operating room, gives digital overlays of key blood vessels
MedCity News
As augmented reality technology improves, you're going to see it in use everywhere — including the operating room. German research institute Fraunhofer MEVIS has created an app that lets surgeons use the iPad as a...

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Surgeons develop app to practice surgery
BBC News
Trainee surgeons are using tablet computers as a way to practise surgery outside the operating theatre. The surgery app was designed by four surgeons in London and can be downloaded on a variety of devices. Dr Advait Gandhe, one of its developers said they wanted to take surgical education to "another level". The app has been downloaded worldwide more than 80,000 times in less than six months.

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Medicare drops certification requirement for bariatric surgery
Clinical Endocrinology News
Medicare is dropping its requirement that bariatric surgery facilities be certified. In a controversial move, officials at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced Sept. 24 that the evidence is sufficient to conclude that certification does not improve health outcomes for Medicare beneficiaries. As a result, the agency will no longer make certification a condition of Medicare coverage.
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Smart technology improves control of robotic leg
Medscape
A new report establishes the feasibility of using a state-of-the-art pattern recognition system to improve control of a robotic leg. With the new system, which uses electromyographic (EMG) signals from re-innervated residual thigh muscles, a patient who had undergone an above-the-knee amputation could seamlessly maneuver his robotic leg, move with a near-normal gait, and climb stairs with relative ease, researchers write.
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FDA approval expands access to artificial heart valve for inoperable patients
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved revised labeling for the Sapien Transcatheter Heart Valve (THV), making the device available to an expanded group of patients who have inoperable aortic valve stenosis, a disease of the heart valves that causes narrowing of the aortic valve, restricting blood flow from the heart. People with severe aortic valve stenosis must have a heart valve replacement to restore normal blood flow.
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New study looks at shared medical decision making
RedOrbit
Shared decision making refers to a set of principles that can be employed by patients and their physicians to explicitly incorporate patient preferences and values into clinical decision making. Past research shows that patients, who have an enhanced knowledge of their medical conditions and treatment alternatives, demonstrate a reduced anxiety when it comes to medical decision making.
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Anesthesiologists sometimes fall short of team needs
Anesthesiology News
Anesthesiologists believe they know what qualities are most important for them to cultivate: competency and calmness under pressure, for instance. But a new study has found that practitioners with whom anesthesiologists frequently work often have much different opinions about what they should deliver — suggesting anesthesiologists may not always be meeting the needs of their team.
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New surgical approach may improve cognitive function in patients with brain cancer
Medical Xpress
A new approach to treating cancer that has spread to the brain is able to preserve and, in some cases, improve cognitive function in patients, while achieving local control of tumor progression. A study led by researchers with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that 98 percent of patients who deferred whole brain radiation therapy and had chemotherapeutic wafers placed around the areas where metastatic tumors in the brain had been surgically removed showed preserved cognitive function in one or more of three domains; 65 percent showed preservation in all areas tested: memory, executive function, and fine motor skills.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Irregularities in air quality promote surgical infections (Medscape)
Morbidly obese 2-year-old world's youngest to have bariatric surgery (Fox News)
Surgeons must balance research and medical training with outstanding patient care (News-Medical.net)
Study: Surgical readmission rates reflect initial care (U.S. News & World Report via HealthDay News)
Will spine surgeons need non-surgical partners in the future? 6 things to know (Becker's Spine Review)
Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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