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2014 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update
We hope you will join us Oct. 23-26, 2014 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco, CA, for our 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 14th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Union Square in the heart of incredible San Francisco.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Click here to REGISTER NOW for best pricing!
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Register now for the 2014 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco.

Register today!
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MORE NEWS


No more questions of cancer removal with new technology
Fort Bend Sun
For breast surgeons, there are critical questions with every lumpectomy performed: Did I remove the right amount of tissue? Are the margins clean? Will I be able to tell my patient we’ve removed all of the cancer? At Memorial Hermann Katy Hospital, these questions just got easier to answer thanks to the deployment of the MarginProbe System, a new FDA-approved intraoperative tissue-assessment tool for breast cancer surgery. Prior to the development of MarginProbe, surgeons would have to send off the excised tissue to a pathology lab to see if any cancer cells remained along the edges. This could take a week or more. Now, using MarginProbe, breast surgeons can test the margins in real time.
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Use of proton pump inhibitors after antireflux surgery
Medscape (free login required)
Although both medical and surgical therapies are effective for management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), there is controversy about the cost-effectiveness of the antireflux surgery for long-term management of GERD. Compounding the difficulty in measuring cost-effectiveness is the fact that there is limited data on the ability of antireflux surgery to eliminate the need for antireflux medications after surgery.
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5 tips for a safer surgery
The Business Journals
You are your own strongest - and best - advocate when it comes to prepping for a safer surgery. Surgical procedures are safer than ever before, but there are still risks, like infection, in all of them. Read on for five tips you should know if you're having surgery, or know someone who is. Hair removal at the surgical site is common.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Lessons healthcare workers can learn from Ebola crisis in Dallas
By Joan Spitrey
According to reports, the patient is currently in isolation and listed in serious condition. As the story unfolded, it was discovered that the patient had presented to the hospital a few days prior with nondescript complaints. However, regrettably, the "information was not communicated to the full team," according to Dr.

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What is the future of limb transplant surgery?
By Alan Kelsky
The ethics of transplanting life-saving organs such as the heart, lungs and liver from people who died in a trauma accident is well established. So are the life-saving gifts of a kidney or part of a liver from live donors. Without these extraordinary medical advances people die.

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3-D-printed replica brains used to guide life-changing pediatric surgery
Product Design Engineering News
It seems the applications for 3-D printing are endless. Now, to add to the ever-growing collection of awesome 3-D-printed goodies, medics have used the famous additive manufacturing technology to produce replicas of infants’ brains in order to practice life-saving but risky surgical procedures.

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Study: Preoperative platelet dysfunction predicts blood product transfusion in children undergoing cardiac surgery.
National Institute of Health
Preoperative platelet dysfunction predicts blood product transfusion in children undergoing cardiac surgery. While cardiopulmonary bypass-associated platelet dysfunction is an important inducer of coagulopathy, preoperative platelet dysfunction can also contribute to this bleeding. The time taken to form a platelet plug is known as closure time and prolonged closure time (CT) indicates platelet dysfunction.
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More breast cancer patients choosing to have reconstructive surgery
Science World Report
Recent findings published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons show that many breast cancer patients are choosing to have breast reconstruction surgery immediately following a mastectomy. For the study, researchers examined data from more than one million breast cancer patients who had a mastectomy between 1998 and 2011. "Implants provide a very simple and straightforward method of reconstruction compared with using one's own abdominal tissues," said lead study author Dr. Evan Matros, assistant professor of surgery and health outcomes research in the department of surgery, division of plastic and reconstructive surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, in a news release.
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Lessons healthcare workers can learn from Ebola crisis in Dallas
By Joan Spitrey
According to reports, the patient is currently in isolation and listed in serious condition. As the story unfolded, it was discovered that the patient had presented to the hospital a few days prior with nondescript complaints. However, regrettably, the "information was not communicated to the full team," according to Dr. However, in healthcare, lessons often come at a cost - human lives - but hopefully not in this case.
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Hospital charges for adolescent scoliosis surgery up
HealthDay News via Medical Xpress
Christopher T. Martin, M.D., from University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, and colleagues used data from the National Inpatient Service to identify 29,594 AIS fusion cases (2001 to 2011). In addition, a single institution's billing system was used to identify average charges from 40 cases over four years. The researchers found that utilization rates for AIS fusions have remained constant, while utilization of adult spinal fusions increased by 64 percent. From 2001 to 2011, mean hospital charges for AIS spinal fusions increased from $72,780 to $155,278 (113 percent increase), averaging 11.3 percent annually, with charges for adult spinal procedures increasing at a similar rate (13.4 percent annually).
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Surgeons say 'no' to noncompliant hernia patients (Anesthesiology News)
Finding keys to recovery after colorectal surgery (General Surgery News)
Massive weight loss increases risk of complications in body-shaping surgery (Science Codex)
New tool assesses skill development in robotic microsurgery, reports Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (Medical Xpress)
The surge in US healthcare jobs: Looking ahead to 2022 (By Dorothy L. Tengler)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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