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AASPA NEWS

2 more days until the
2014 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update!

We hope you will join us Oct. 23-26, 2014 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco, CA, for our 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 14th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Union Square in the heart of incredible San Francisco.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you!

Click here to REGISTER NOW for best pricing!
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Register now for the 2014 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support
Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course Purpose
  • To better prepare the nonintensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
  • To assist the nonintensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
  • To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
  • To prepare critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.
Course will be held before the 14th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco.

Register today!
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MORE NEWS


Devices integrate MRIs into surgeries
The Boston Globe
Doctors like to see what they are doing, and so they love magnetic resonance imaging scanners. MRI machines let them look inside the human body to see damaged tissues or dangerous tumors. But MRI machines are designed in such a way that doctors cannot work on a patient while he is inside, to take tissue samples, for example, or even perform surgery. Now, researchers are developing tools to let doctors work on their patients while they are inside the MRI cocoon, a concept called “image-guided intervention.”
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Age and deep brain stimulation: Advancing age as a concern
Healthcare Professionals Network
Deep brain simulation (DBS) has been available since 1997 for essential tremor and approved for Parkinson’s disease (PD) since 2002. DBS is now widely accepted as a reliable intervention for advanced PD. PD patients who undergo DBS and take medication tend to have better movement control than those who rely on medication alone. However, the potential for side effects and complications exist. Until now, researchers have not addressed the relationship between patient age and primary surgical complication rates in PD patients.
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Surgeons weigh pros, cons of fixated, anterior chamber IOLs
Healio
The benefits of fixated IOLs outweigh the benefits of anterior chamber IOLs due to the increased risk for glaucoma, intraocular inflammation and corneal decompensation seen with anterior chamber IOLs, a surgeon postulated here in a debate of the issue. “We are comfortable with anterior chamber IOLs, and the surgery is simple and effective in our hands,” Jonathan L. Prenner, M.D., said during a presentation at the Refractive Surgery Subspecialty Day preceding the American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting.
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Cardiac surgery: Aftercare
The Pharmaceutical Journal
More than 34,000 cardiac operations are performed in the U.K. each year. Following heart surgery, patients typically stay in hospital for up to a week and require ongoing support from a cardiac rehabilitation team following discharge. Patients are at risk of developing a range of complications and require a range of medicines in both the short and long term to ensure their operation is a success. This article focuses on aftercare following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or valve surgery.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Cardiac surgery: Aftercare
The Pharmaceutical Journal
More than 34,000 cardiac operations are performed in the U.K. each year. Following heart surgery, patients typically stay in hospital for up to a week and require ongoing support from a cardiac rehabilitation team following discharge.

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Study: Anesthesia complications drop by half
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Anesthesia-related complications in the United States have fallen by more than half, while the overall death rate has remained the same, a new study indicates.

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What is the future of limb transplant surgery?
By Alan Kelsky
The ethics of transplanting life-saving organs such as the heart, lungs and liver from people who died in a trauma accident is well established. So are the life-saving gifts of a kidney or part of a liver from live donors. Without these extraordinary medical advances people die.

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After 40 years of painful pancreatitis, patient helped by unique procedure
Health Canal
"I had suffered all of my life but didn’t know until 2002 that I had a condition called pancreas divisum,” she says. "As I got older, the episodes got worse which meant multiple trips to the emergency room.” Pancreas divisum is a birth defect in which parts of the pancreas fail to join together. A majority of people born with pancreas divisum will not have symptoms; however, a small group of people, such as Corradi, develop symptoms which commonly include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and chronic pancreatitis.
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Open heart surgery with only a cellphone's light
Medical Daily
Dr. Kaldarbek Abdramanov, a cardiac surgeon in Kyrgyzstan, was performing open-heart surgery on patient Tagir Karabayev in a state-run clinic when the hospital lights went out. Not wanting to risk the surgery, Dr. Abdramanov’s team of surgeons took their phones out and focused the mobile light on the patient’s open chest.
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Laparoscopic splenectomy underutilized in the US
The Oncology Report
Laparoscopic splenectomy has become the preferred surgical approach in the literature, but the number of such procedures performed in the United States remains relatively low, according to Dr. John Afthinos. National data for 2005-2010 showed a total of 37,006 elective total splenectomies were performed. Only 4,938 of them, or 13.3 percent, began as laparoscopic procedures, of which 40 percent had to be converted to open splenectomies, he reported at the annual Minimally Invasive Surgery Week.
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Emory anesthesiologists offer insight on bracing for Ebola
Medscape (free login required)
Anesthesiologists can be counted on to properly staff and safely care for patients with Ebola, and they should be key players in planning for this possible, though unlikely, scenario at their hospitals, according to one anesthesiologist with experience with these challenges. With the latest transfer of an infected Dallas nurse, Emory University physicians and nurses have now cared for four patients infected with the Ebola virus.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study: Anesthesia complications drop by half (HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report)
CDC will offer more Ebola training to Healthcare workers (The New York Times)
Caldolor reports favorable inflammatory response results in laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery patients (Pharmaceutical Business Review)
Robotic adnexal surgeries may have more complications than laparoscopic (2 minute medicine)
Study: Robotic surgery brings higher costs, more complications (The Wall Street Journal)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
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