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Child's appendix more likely to rupture in regions short of surgeons
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Children and teens with poor access to general surgeons are at increased risk of suffering a ruptured appendix, and the risk is particularly high among young children, a new study finds. If an infected appendix isn't removed quickly enough, it can burst or rupture, leading to a serious, sometimes fatal infection, according to background information from the study.
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To quarantine or not? A question of trust
By Joan Spitrey
As the debate rages on regarding quarantines ordered by state governors, Kaci Hickox — the nurse who was ordered home quarantine — refuses to comply. So the national conversation continues. As a nurse, Hickox needs to set an example. It appears she wants to make a point that she is not infectious, but her message is not being heard through its delivery of selfishness. Although all do not agree upon the current course of action, there are a few things we all agree on.
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Thoracic surgeons release new guidelines for treatment of esophageal cancer
Healio
New evidence-based clinical practice recommendations released by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons outline the importance of multimodality treatment for patients with cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. These peer-reviewed guidelines are part of a series released and to-be-released by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) addressing esophageal cancer treatment. They include nine recommendations, the most important of which is “that the care for these patients be done in a multidisciplinary setting,” Alex G. Little, M.D., of the University of Arizona, Tucson, and chair of the guideline task force, told Healio Gastroenterology.
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Can digital health tools lower the risk of malpractice lawsuits?
Forbes
Based on evidence that a breakdown in communication between doctor and patient plays a role in malpractice suits, a small Oakland, California-based medical liability insurer is embarking on an intriguing experiment. In what appears to be the first project of its kind, MIEC plans to encourage orthopedic surgeons to use a communication tool made by HealthLoop that allows physicians to check in with their patients on a daily basis following surgery.
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Child's appendix more likely to rupture in regions short of surgeons
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Children and teens with poor access to general surgeons are at increased risk of suffering a ruptured appendix, and the risk is particularly high among young children, a new study finds.

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The link between weight loss surgery and headaches
TIME
Weight loss surgery may be a risk factor for a specific kind of headache, according to a new study published in the journal Neurology. Researchers looked at 338 patients with a history of spontaneous intracranial hypotension and found that 11 of those patients had undergone a form of bariatric surgery.

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Cardiac surgery: Aftercare
The Pharmaceutical Journal
More than 34,000 cardiac operations are performed in the U.K. each year. Following heart surgery, patients typically stay in hospital for up to a week and require ongoing support from a cardiac rehabilitation team following discharge.

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3-D printed rib cages help train pediatric surgeons
Health Data Management
Northwestern University researchers have collaborated on a new three-dimensional modeling approach to training pediatric surgeons that makes practice surgeries far more realistic and safer. Katherine Barsness, M.D., an associate professor of surgery and medical education at Northwestern's Feinberg School of Medicine, teamed up with colleagues at Feinberg's Innovations Lab and the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Sciences to create life-sized, reusable models of a newborn’s ribcage.
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Weight loss surgery reduces the risk of Type 2 diabetes
Health Canal
Being overweight or obese is the main modifiable risk factor for Type 2 diabetes. More than 80 per cent of adults with Type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. In England, just over a quarter of adults (26 per cent) were classified as obese in 2010 (body mass index [BMI] 30kg/m2 or over). Up to 3 percent of people with severe obesity (BMI 40kg/m2 or more) develop diabetes each year.
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Surgeons fine-tune imaging techniques to enhance visualization of breast tumors, persistent wounds
News-Medical
Surgeons are tweaking existing computer technologies to enhance their visualization of cancerous tumors and persistent wounds according to two studies presented this week at the 2014 American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress. One research team tested the visualization of simulated breast tumors using three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound imaging and specially designed, augmented-reality software that allows the surgeon to pinpoint the tumor and measure its volume, including its depth.
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Surgeon type doesn't affect spinal surgery complications
HealthDay News via Healthcare Professionals Network
Complication rates are similar for single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusions, whether the procedure is performed by a neurosurgeon or orthopedic surgeon, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of Spine. Shobhit V. Minhas, from the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, and colleagues utilized the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database to identify 1,994 patients who underwent single-level ACDF (2006 to 2012). Propensity matching was used to make comparisons between neurological and orthopedic surgeons.
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Regenerative cells: Hope for people disabled by spinal cord injury
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Stem cells have several unique properties that separate them from other cells. They can proliferate so that they are capable of replenishing themselves for long periods of time by dividing, and they are unspecialized cells that can differentiate into specialized cells such as nerve or heart cells. In addition to treating cancers such as leukemia, stem cells are used to treat other diseases such as Parkinson's, stroke, Alzheimer's, retinal diseases and spinal cord injuries
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The link between weight loss surgery and headaches (TIME)
Different routes of central venous catheterization and their relative risks (By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani)
World's smallest liver-kidney transplant saves toddler's life (By Lynn Hetzler)
Surgeons implant 'dead' heart for first time (New York Daily News)
Cardiac surgery: Aftercare (The Pharmaceutical Journal)

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