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A heart simulator meant to help the real thing
The New York Times
Imagine, as a surgeon or medical student, being able to walk around inside an immersive 3-D simulation of a beating heart. You could insert a stent into a valve and simulate what will happen as blood tries to flow through — is the stent too big, tearing the tissue around it, or too small, causing blood to leak around its edges? You could simulate the effects of a heart attack or a medical procedure. Or you could use the simulation technology to create a unique, 3-D model of an individual patient's heart, using data from a CT scan or MRI. Those are some of the goals of a research project and simulation software created by a company better known for creating 3-D models of cars and jets.
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Hard-to-treat epilepsy? Surgical advances may help you
Health Hub from Cleveland Clinic
If you have treatment-resistant epilepsy, you may benefit from recent advances in surgical procedures. The newest is a treatment called responsive neurostimulation therapy, which the FDA approved late last year. The treatment can alleviate epilepsy for some patients with partial onset seizures that have not been controlled by two or more medications and are not candidates for surgical resection. The treatment is an alternative for patients who have no other surgical options.
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End to global payments a 'nightmare,' surgeons say
Health Leaders Media
A new Medicare rule that unbundles global surgeons' fees for thousands of procedures not only bucks a national trend toward episode-based pay, it will confuse millions of beneficiaries who will receive a dozen or more bills instead of one, each requiring a 20 percent co-payment. That's the concern of the American College of Surgeons, whose medical director, Frank Opelka, M.D., says the policy, announced last month, will be "an administrative burden for surgeons ... a nightmare to track," and ultimately, "penny-wise and pound-foolish."
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Research: American doctors are 'drowning in paperwork'
By Scott E. Rupp
According to a new study, U.S. doctors spend nearly 17 percent of their working lives on nonpatient-related paperwork — time that might otherwise be spent caring for patients. The findings also suggest that the more time doctors spend on such tasks, the unhappier they are about having chosen medicine as a career.
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A heart simulator meant to help the real thing
The New York Times
Imagine, as a surgeon or medical student, being able to walk around inside an immersive 3-D simulation of a beating heart. You could insert a stent into a valve and simulate what will happen as blood tries to flow through — is the stent too big, tearing the tissue around it, or too small, causing blood to leak around its edges?

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Mental practice improves surgery outcomes
Medscape (free login required)
Surgeons performing advanced laparoscopic surgery can improve their skills by mentally practicing procedures, according to a study presented here at the American College of Surgeons 2014 Clinical Congress.

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Child's appendix more likely to rupture in regions short of surgeons
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Children and teens with poor access to general surgeons are at increased risk of suffering a ruptured appendix, and the risk is particularly high among young children, a new study finds.

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Hand-hygiene compliance drops at the end of shifts
FierceHealthcare
Hospital workers are less likely to wash their hands toward the end of their shifts, according to new research that suggests the lack of compliance is due to fatigue from the demands of the job. Researchers, led by Hengchen Dai, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Pennsylvania, analyzed three years of hand-washing data from more than 4,000 caregivers in 35 hospitals across the U.S. They discovered hand-washing compliance rates dropped an average of 8.7 percentage points from the beginning to the end of a typical 12-hour shift, according to the study, published by the American Psychological Association.
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New app predicts complications, costs of ventral hernia repair
Pain Medicine News
It’s one of the oldest rituals between a surgeon and his or her patient: a preoperative discussion about a patient’s upcoming surgery. Now, there’s an app for that. Hernia surgeons at Carolinas Medical Center have created an app that calculates a patient’s risk for postoperative wound complications and the associated costs from a ventral hernia repair.
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Pediatric surgeons using app to keep parents calm during surgery
KFOR-TV
When your child is in the hospital, parents are always worried. However, doctors at one Florida hospital decided to use technology to keep parents’ nerves calm. Surgeons at Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children in Orlando are using a secure app to send photos and text updates to parents during their children’s operation.
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2nd surgeries after breast cancer lumpectomy
HealthDay News via WebMD
In a study of more than 240,000 women who had breast conservation surgery for breast cancer, nearly 25 percent needed a second operation, a new study finds. "There are very few operations where you would expect to have a second surgery," said lead researcher Dr. Lee Wilke, director of the section of surgical oncology at the Breast Cancer Center at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison.
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New EHR vendors and technology needed for continued innovation
By Scott E. Rupp
In the span of the last five years, use and implementation of electronic health records in the U.S. has dramatically accelerated because of federal mandates and financial incentives directly related the meaningful use program. Because of these efforts, as well as time and resources invested by healthcare providers, electronic health records are more popular than at any point in the past and are now "the heart of health IT," according to research firm Frost & Sullivan.
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Focusing on success in retinal surgery
Outpatient Surgery
There's a revolution underway in retinal surgery. In a very short period of time, a 20-gauge surgery that required sutures and often general anesthesia has become a 25- or 27-gauge surgery that's suture-less and usually done under local anesthesia. Our new techniques are far superior. We've improved efficiency, we've improved safety and we've improved outcomes. And these huge leaps forward are just the beginning. The field is going to be advancing even faster over the next few years.
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Coaching: Breaking it down for healthcare leaders
By Christina Thielst
Great leaders are sometimes measured by how deeply they have impacted the lives of others, and the ability to coach those around them is a common characteristic. What is coaching? It is really just a tool for effective communication between a leader and those they lead. It helps build a mutual understanding of goals, alignment of expectations, the sharing of knowledge as it is needed and more adaptive and reactive teams.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    A balloon for obesity: An option between medication and surgery? (Medical Xpress)
Surgery by non-surgeons: An impending future (The Huffington Post)
Mental practice improves surgery outcomes (Medscape (free login required))
Effective treatment for phantom limb pain continues to be elusive (News-Medical)
New guidelines for multimodality treatment of esophageal cancer (EndoNurse)

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